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elcs

Chances? Foreign BA & MA, cGPA 3.48, LSAT 168~170

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Here're my stats:

  • cGPA: 3.48
  • L2: 3.6 (but I went on exchange during the first semester of junior year, so my last 2 years only have grades for 3 semesters, how are these situations considered? do they affect anything?)
  • B3: 3.55
  • LSAT: 168~170, this is not an actual score, I'll be taking the LSAT in June and I'm aiming for 168~170. I know it's a bit odd asking people to predict using an aiming score. But given how LSAT can predict law shcool GPA to a certain degree and how future employment depends largely on GPA, and that I'll be paying much more as a foreign student, I don't think I should go to law school unless I can be quite sure that I'll do well in law school. 
  • Average LoR, I'll get 2 LoR from my MA professors, nothing special there
  • Average ECs, I did some internships at multinational companies, but they are not law related at all. They'd look good if I'm applying for entry level positions at companies, but probably very dull for law school admins, if anything, they might even wonder if I'm serious about law school.

I know that my undergrad GPA is very weak for law school applications and would need a high LSAT score to compensate for that. I simply wasn't thinking about law school during undergrad at all and my GPA is actually quite decent at my uni (anything > 3.0 is considered solid, >3.5 is impressive, >3.7? my guess is fewer than 5 people have that, 3.9? 4.0? You're a unicorn and a faculty legend, lores will be told about you for generations to come). Another thing is, since my undergrad was not from a north america university, does GPA still matter as much? I heard that for US law schools, admins don't care about foreign GPAs at all because they will not be included for law school ranking purpose and rely primarily on LSAT instead. I'm wondering if this is also the case for Canadian law school, but then again, Canadian law schools don't seem to care about ranking as much... And does my MA help at all (my MA cGPA on the other hand though, is through the roof)?

Also, would I get a diversity factor of some sorts? Since I'll be an international student? Then again, Asians are no strangers to law schools. 

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IMHO, you're over thinking this. The GPA from your BA and your LSAT score are pretty much all that matter.

First, where did you do your BA? Is your 3.48 cGPA from BA + MA or just BA? Do you need to convert your grades to use them for admission? Also, you might be interested to know that some law schools only look at your best two years.

Secondly,  you need to write the LSAT for anyone to give you an idea of chances.

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On 11/29/2019 at 9:45 PM, conge said:

IMHO, you're over thinking this. The GPA from your BA and your LSAT score are pretty much all that matter.

First, where did you do your BA? Is your 3.48 cGPA from BA + MA or just BA? Do you need to convert your grades to use them for admission? Also, you might be interested to know that some law schools only look at your best two years.

Secondly,  you need to write the LSAT for anyone to give you an idea of chances.

I did my BA at the University of Hong Kong, it's a legit university so shouldn't be an issue there.  The 3.48 is the cGPA from BA, my MA is 3.97. I don't think I need to convert the grades since my uni calculated GPA same as OLSAS. 

I know some law schools only look at best 2 or best 3 or last two, but it doesn't matter much since the grades from my first three years were quite similar and only in my final year did I put in much more effort to get better grades. 

I know I need a real LSAT score, but it's still 6~7 months away till I write for one. I wanna know if I do that get score, what would my chances be like, given my low undergrad cGPA.

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"I did my BA at the University of Hong Kong, it's a legit university so shouldn't be an issue there.  The 3.48 is the cGPA from BA, my MA is 3.97. I don't think I need to convert the grades since my uni calculated GPA same as OLSAS. "

 

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-gpa-calculations/

Grades from countries other than Canada and the US are processed as non-convertible. The transcript will be forwarded to the institution(s) you applied to for evaluation.

 

 

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-transcript/#international

Transcripts from International Institutions (Excluding the US)

  • OLSAS requires a WES evaluation for all international transcripts.
  • WES evaluations must be sent directly to OLSAS by WES and must be received by the application deadline.
  • You are responsible for arranging the transfer of all other transcripts and documents to OLSAS.

Assessment of International Academic Credentials

Credentialing assessment means converting international academic credentials into their Canadian educational equivalents. If a WES evaluation includes a copy of your official transcript, you are not required to request a transcript from your registrar.

  • If your undergraduate studies were taken outside Canada and the US, you must have your transcript assessed by WES.
  • If your graduate studies were taken outside Canada and the US, you are not required to have your transcript evaluated by WES, although such evaluation may be requested.
  • If you are a National Committee of Accreditation candidate, you are not required to have your transcripts provided to OLSAS by WES.
  • A WES evaluation is not required for courses taken as part of an exchange program, as long as transfer credits for these courses appear on the home university transcript.

Request that a course-by-course evaluation be reported for your international grades. The evaluation will not be valid without an overall grade point average (GPA). However, the admission committees of the law schools reserve the right to apply their own evaluation.

WES evaluations must be sent directly to OLSAS by WES and must be received by the application deadline.

Reminder: OLSAS will convert grades of courses taken at accredited universities in the US. These applicants do not require a WES evaluation.

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12 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

"I did my BA at the University of Hong Kong, it's a legit university so shouldn't be an issue there.  The 3.48 is the cGPA from BA, my MA is 3.97. I don't think I need to convert the grades since my uni calculated GPA same as OLSAS. "

 

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-gpa-calculations/

Grades from countries other than Canada and the US are processed as non-convertible. The transcript will be forwarded to the institution(s) you applied to for evaluation.

 

 

https://www.ouac.on.ca/guide/olsas-transcript/#international

Transcripts from International Institutions (Excluding the US)

  • OLSAS requires a WES evaluation for all international transcripts.
  • WES evaluations must be sent directly to OLSAS by WES and must be received by the application deadline.
  • You are responsible for arranging the transfer of all other transcripts and documents to OLSAS.

Assessment of International Academic Credentials

Credentialing assessment means converting international academic credentials into their Canadian educational equivalents. If a WES evaluation includes a copy of your official transcript, you are not required to request a transcript from your registrar.

  • If your undergraduate studies were taken outside Canada and the US, you must have your transcript assessed by WES.
  • If your graduate studies were taken outside Canada and the US, you are not required to have your transcript evaluated by WES, although such evaluation may be requested.
  • If you are a National Committee of Accreditation candidate, you are not required to have your transcripts provided to OLSAS by WES.
  • A WES evaluation is not required for courses taken as part of an exchange program, as long as transfer credits for these courses appear on the home university transcript.

Request that a course-by-course evaluation be reported for your international grades. The evaluation will not be valid without an overall grade point average (GPA). However, the admission committees of the law schools reserve the right to apply their own evaluation.

WES evaluations must be sent directly to OLSAS by WES and must be received by the application deadline.

Reminder: OLSAS will convert grades of courses taken at accredited universities in the US. These applicants do not require a WES evaluation.

Thank you so much for this! I've totally overlooked this before! Just did a free online GPA calculator, apparently mine is 3.7

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14 hours ago, elcs said:

Thank you so much for this! I've totally overlooked this before! Just did a free online GPA calculator, apparently mine is 3.7

That's just undergrad, right? MA GPA should not be included. Also, I would not rely on a online GPA calculator (unless it's official in some capacity); it sounds like you need it converted by a specific company for it to be used for admission.

On ‎12‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 4:10 AM, elcs said:

I know I need a real LSAT score, but it's still 6~7 months away till I write for one. I wanna know if I do that get score, what would my chances be like, given my low undergrad cGPA.

Your UG isn't low, and it sounds like you did well in your program, but you need a real LSAT score and converted GPA to get a realistic admissions opinion, and right now we don't have either.

If your GPA is converted to a 3.7, and if you actually score a 168-170 on the LSAT, then I'd say any school in Canada is within reach; right now the only honest answer is that no school is within reach, but that's simply because you don't have an LSAT score (or an official GPA conversion, though I'd be willing to bet your GPA conversion will spit out a competitive GPA, based on what I've read about it so far).

One option for getting a proxy of your LSAT score is to do a timed practice test under test like conditions (e.g., don't take breaks you wouldn't get during real thing, etc.) But be aware that ppl usually score higher on practice tests than the real thing, and (in my experience) nearly everyone overestimates their ability to get a high score.

(You may already know this, but a 168 translates to something like the 95th percentile, meaning you estimate that you will score better than 95% of all test takers. By definition, that is an unlikely result.)

Edited by conge

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3 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

Are you in HK now?

Yeah, I am. Are you too?

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4 hours ago, elcs said:

Yeah, I am. Are you too?

5 demands - Not one less 

i am in Canada. 

Edited by Luckycharm
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1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

5 demands - Not one less 

i am in Canada. 

Thanks! Appreciate the support!

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