Jump to content
member123456

Chances for Ottawa, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Calgary, TRU, Windsor

Recommended Posts

3.7 ish GPA, will likely finish with a 3.73-3.75 L2 - rough first year with strong upward trend. explained in personal statement. -3.4-3.5 cumulative roughly. 

Writing lsat in January. PTing around 160 (seems to vary, sometimes 157/158/159, other times as high as 163) 

Good references. 

Decent EC's. Involved in a campus club, did a big case compeition involving heavy research. Was a teaching assistant, worked throughout uni. 

Personal statement is good (in my opinion)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For UofA, you’re cutting it close, my friend. Based on last year’s admissions profile, only one applicant with a 3.7 GPA was admitted with a 157-158 LSAT (see link below). I wouldn’t count on your softs - only 26 spots went to holistic review/aboriginal applicants.

Keep up your studies (both academic and LSAT) and nail that LSAT; UofA is certainly within your grasp!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u9luOkViBOYVM2bWFMcmJNcUpOZVBZY0lsTVpyOGRIaGFR/view

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TimTheEnchanter said:

For UofA, you’re cutting it close, my friend. Based on last year’s admissions profile, only one applicant with a 3.7 GPA was admitted with a 157-158 LSAT (see link below). I wouldn’t count on your softs - only 26 spots went to holistic review/aboriginal applicants.

Keep up your studies (both academic and LSAT) and nail that LSAT; UofA is certainly within your grasp!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u9luOkViBOYVM2bWFMcmJNcUpOZVBZY0lsTVpyOGRIaGFR/view

Thanks for the helpful input! Any opinions on the other schools listed? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USask takes your best two years only when calculating your GPA, so you should be good if you keep your LSAT above 157. 

Edited by hjg17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, thesizzlingwok said:

You should be almost a forsure at UofS, especially if you have any Sask connection

I have a minor Sask connection. One of my close friends/family friends (we go back all the way to middle school) and her sisters go to school there. Not sure how they will look at that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, member123456 said:

I have a minor Sask connection. One of my close friends/family friends (we go back all the way to middle school) and her sisters go to school there. Not sure how they will look at that

I find the Sask connection thing a little vague on the website. They say they only give a 'slight preference' to people with a SK connection (that's the wording), but others on this site say they weigh it heavily. They don't publish a formula so it's hard to be sure.

Further, if you read the instructions in detail, they also say that some types of connection are appropriate to describe in your personal statement and that others are more appropriate to the distinct box on the application where you are invited to describe your connection. So I am not sure how much weight is given to the two distinct places where this information is requested.

Finally, they also invite you to tell them, by creating entries on your application, about any time you have spent living in any of the provinces or territories that don't have law schools, but notably don't ask you to comment on those experiences in any narrative form.

So, in my case, I explained that I have lived twice in SK for a total of 10 months, that I chose to get married there because I loved it there, that my wife is also applying to school there, and that I also lived in the Yukon briefly... and I have absolutely no idea whether I framed these connections in the way they want, nor how much weight they will have even if I did! You know, maybe I should also have mentioned that I visited the John Diefenbaker house in Prince Albert and read up on his early criminal defence work? ;)

OP, sorry to make such a long rant not directly related to your question. My main point is that it is hard to evaluate chances at any of the schools that have some 'soft' subjective elements, instead of rigid formulae... and all the schools you have mentioned, except I think U of A, are ones that use that type of 'holistic' evaluation.

-GM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GrumpyMountie said:

I find the Sask connection thing a little vague on the website. They say they only give a 'slight preference' to people with a SK connection (that's the wording), but others on this site say they weigh it heavily. They don't publish a formula so it's hard to be sure.

Further, if you read the instructions in detail, they also say that some types of connection are appropriate to describe in your personal statement and that others are more appropriate to the distinct box on the application where you are invited to describe your connection. So I am not sure how much weight is given to the two distinct places where this information is requested.

Finally, they also invite you to tell them, by creating entries on your application, about any time you have spent living in any of the provinces or territories that don't have law schools, but notably don't ask you to comment on those experiences in any narrative form.

So, in my case, I explained that I have lived twice in SK for a total of 10 months, that I chose to get married there because I loved it there, that my wife is also applying to school there, and that I also lived in the Yukon briefly... and I have absolutely no idea whether I framed these connections in the way they want, nor how much weight they will have even if I did! You know, maybe I should also have mentioned that I visited the John Diefenbaker house in Prince Albert and read up on his early criminal defence work? ;)

OP, sorry to make such a long rant not directly related to your question. My main point is that it is hard to evaluate chances at any of the schools that have some 'soft' subjective elements, instead of rigid formulae... and all the schools you have mentioned, except I think U of A, are ones that use that type of 'holistic' evaluation.

-GM

Hahaha. No need to apologize, I feel your pain. 

The holistic schools are both a blessing and a curse at the same time. It's so hard not to wonder what your chances are and feel a bit of anxiety (a lot in my case), but the fact that they look at softs also gives me hope. 

Alas, I guess we will have to wait and see. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@GrumpyMountie @member123456 I'm a UofS student so we can kinda talk on this if you guys' want or I can lend to you what seems to be the circumstances of our student landscape. 

So, generally speaking, a Sask connection is nice. If any family member is a uSask alumni (college of law or otherwise), mention it and ride that out. If you lived in Sask, no matter the period of time: mention it. I think they sincerely have an inclination to cater towards prairie people or people that are open to Saskatchewan and not just coming here because they maybe didn't get in at home (we do get less applicants on average so some of our entry stats are lower for sure). We're very Sask proud because we serve our province and - my understanding is - that one year (a handful of years ago) that a large amount of out-of-province students came to uSask for first year and transferred away come second year with no transferees to take their places so it left the college in a bad spot, and the college operates largely off of tuition. Not sure if this 1000% true but I've heard it. Logic behind it being that they want to try and add a filter to keep people in Sask for school as well as after school. Specific to your uSask application, I left my Sask connection to the specific box on the online application and made no mention of it in my personal statement. I think your personal statement should be your personal narrative and unless that includes a sincere allegiance to Saskatchewan I think you can just leave that for that box on your app.

As for the living in Sask or in a province without a law school. Part of the idea behind that is we want to treat students from outside of Saskatchewan that live in provinces/territories without law schools with the same love we treat homegrown Saskatchewanian's. Our Dean loves the maritimes and the reputation uSask grads out east uphold. We have reserved seats for Indigenous students from Newfoundland & Labrador, and we have our Nunavut Law Program. In short, we want to be the province and school that shows love to those students in places that don't have law schools. 

@member123456 it sounds like you got a tenuous Sask connection but I imagine you can substantiate the extent of that relationship and its importance in your app, and @GrumpyMountie it sounds like you got a solid one.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • "cGPA: 3.29 L2: 3.5 LSAT: 159 (2 writes)" @strugglingSFUgal In your shoes I would accept at UofC now. Based on your profile, even with some improvements admission at UVic is far from guaranteed next year (as you yourself acknowledge).
    • what are your stats? 
    • Hi Everyone! I am in my 5th year of uni and I've been accepted to U of C for 2020 and honestly, given my stats, I wasn't expecting any acceptances (especially this early) and had already started studying for my LSAT again to be more competitive for next cycle. I am super excited about this acceptance, but I'm a little stuck on what to doooo. My ultimate goal is UVic, but I didn't apply this cycle as my stats weren't competitive. However, if I was to apply next year, with the increase in credit drops after this semester, my GPA would be competitive and I would just have to work at getting a couple points higher on the LSAT (obviously, working to get a higher LSAT is never a guarantee). As a BC resident, I'd eventually like to make my way back here, although I'm okay living somewhere else for a couple years before that. My question is, do you think I should take the acceptance with U of C and say bye-bye to the LSAT, or should I decline U of C, try for a higher LSAT, and gun for UVic?  Any advice is appreciated  
    • I submitted the day of the deadline (Jan 15th) and got accepted today, so just over a month later. So to answer your question, no - it doesn't seem that they go by order submitted. I know some other strong applicants who have not heard back having applied earlier. 
    • I got in very quickly with a lower GPA, mine was 3.37. However, I did have a somewhat high LSAT at 170.

×
×
  • Create New...