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fitzroy

Holistic vs. Numbers

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It's that time of year when we all start getting nervous about admissions and asking for chances! These discussions have me wondering which schools have the most holistic admissions and which rely heavily on numbers. I know a lot of schools mention a holistic admissions process, but it seems holistic admissions are not all created equal. In your experience, where do schools land on a numbers-to-softs scale?

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3 hours ago, fitzroy said:

It's that time of year when we all start getting nervous about admissions and asking for chances! These discussions have me wondering which schools have the most holistic admissions and which rely heavily on numbers. I know a lot of schools mention a holistic admissions process, but it seems holistic admissions are not all created equal. In your experience, where do schools land on a numbers-to-softs scale?

I am not sure of how we define "holistic admissions."

That said, I would say that Windsor law has the most holistic admission policies in Canada.

Law schools that maintain index scores have numbers-based admission policies. Those schools are: uVic law, UBC law, uAlberta law, and Manitoba law.

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Windsor is probably the most holistic. Although Osgoode is also holistic, stats are still very important, and the majority of the class get in with strong stats that would make them competitive at other law schools as well. 

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UAlberta is overwhelmingly numbers based, but had 36 “holistic review admits” last year in a class of 186 according to the viewbook. So they are not purely numbers based, but definitely most applicants are admitted on numbers.

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UBC changed their admission policy this year to 1/3 LSAT, 1/3 GPA, 1/3 PS. It will be interesting to see if this has an effect on the entrance stats.

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2 hours ago, Aschenbach said:

UBC changed their admission policy this year to 1/3 LSAT, 1/3 GPA, 1/3 PS. It will be interesting to see if this has an effect on the entrance stats.

As per the thread in the UBC section, it seems as if everyone who is being admitted in the first round still hits the 92 index score range. Perhaps the later rounds will differ more substantially, it’ll be interesting for sure. 

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On 11/29/2019 at 2:52 AM, PlatoandSocrates said:

As per the thread in the UBC section, it seems as if everyone who is being admitted in the first round still hits the 92 index score range. Perhaps the later rounds will differ more substantially, it’ll be interesting for sure. 

To my knowledge, no one has officially received an offer of admission yet.

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