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pele24

Lots of clerical work normal?

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I have a question regarding type of work. I switched firms and in my new firm, which is a Commercial Real Estate firm, have to do lots of clerical things such as doing accounts, cheques, envelopes etc. These things take crazy amount of my time. I feel like instead of focusing on legal work, I constantly calculate accounts and doing cheques.

In my previous firm, which was a bit smaller and with small clients I never touched those things. 

Huge amount of work, very high expectations to do everything very fast, very big clients, not enough staff, and no proper division of work between young lawyers and law clerks 

I would appreciate any thoughts on this topic. 
 

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When I started at my firm, we were 3 lawyers with 1 assistant. Her role was largely reception. I was serving, filing, preparing closing letters, billing, etc. I'm a 5 year call and I still do my own paperwork, billing and most of my correspondence. I've had an assistant for nearly 2 years now. It might be something that you'll get more admin support once "you've paid dues" so to speak. You could tactfully speak with a more senior person to see what the situation is. Are you billing enough to make a case to hire your own admin support?

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23 hours ago, artsydork said:

When I started at my firm, we were 3 lawyers with 1 assistant. Her role was largely reception. I was serving, filing, preparing closing letters, billing, etc. I'm a 5 year call and I still do my own paperwork, billing and most of my correspondence. I've had an assistant for nearly 2 years now. It might be something that you'll get more admin support once "you've paid dues" so to speak. You could tactfully speak with a more senior person to see what the situation is. Are you billing enough to make a case to hire your own admin support?

How you bill for admin work that you do?

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I'm not a lawyer, but I work in a commerical real estate firm as an assistant. I can really see how the lines get blurred for you, because I must admit, the clerical stuff is incredibly annoying (which I do all of the accounts etc). 

I agree with artsydork; try tastefully asking to see if the firm could hire an admin? Like even an unexperienced uni student - especially one eager to be in the field of law.

I can see how being stuck behind administrative work affect your practice and productivity (especially with BIG DEADLINES). 



 

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4 hours ago, sarstan said:

How you bill for admin work that you do?

Correspondence and drafting pleadings are billables. I used to waste a lot of time filing and serving. You just work more hours. You need the cashflow to have an assistant though.

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