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harveyspecter993

How do people get A+ averages in law school?

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I'm not sure what law school you are referring to, or which examples you are citing, but I'm reasonably sure even gold medalists do not routinely get A+s across the board. Is there some reason you believe this is the case?

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10 minutes ago, Diplock said:

I'm not sure what law school you are referring to, or which examples you are citing, but I'm reasonably sure even gold medalists do not routinely get A+s across the board. Is there some reason you believe this is the case?

One average, 1% of the year at osgoode gets an A+ average . That's 3 people.

Edited by harveyspecter993

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Just now, harveyspecter993 said:

One average, 1% of the year at osgoode gets an A+ average . That's 3 people.

Could partially be luck in the sense that they get A+s in classes that are worth more credits and B+s/As (probably more As) in classes worth less. They don't necessarily need straight A+s.

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Fwiw, my friend that ended up at the scc had just under a 3.5 from McGill. Pretty sure the gold medalist my year was around the 3.7 mark. Basically, you will get at least one mark in the B range while at McGill though over 50% fall between 3 and 3.3. 

It's a a complex answer, same as how we left our undergrads as in the top percentiles. 

 

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Not to brag too hard but I was the bronze medallist, and I think I had a C+ on my transcript somewhere.  I don't think an A+ average is possible.

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When I was at U of T, graduating with honours required an A average. There were no A+ grades. In our cohort of 190 students, 16 of us were in the 'with honours' designation.  I didn't have straight A grades but I still had an A average. My guess is that that was the case with the others as well. As to your question, I would imagine that it is a result of both, although I think a certain level of intelligence and ability to do well on law school exams and papers is more important than the level of hard work. There will always be students who work very hard but won't achieve A grades, and there will always be students who don't have to work hard to achieve those same A's. 

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42 minutes ago, artsydork said:

Fwiw, my friend that ended up at the scc had just under a 3.5 from McGill. Pretty sure the gold medalist my year was around the 3.7 mark. Basically, you will get at least one mark in the B range while at McGill though over 50% fall between 3 and 3.3. 

It's a a complex answer, same as how we left our undergrads as in the top percentiles. 

 

Yup. I know someone that made it to the SCC with a high B+ average and was not a medalist, but had significant experience working with aboriginal/marginalized communities. 

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At uOttawa, summa cum laude distinction requires a 9.0+ average. An A+ is a 10, an A is a 9. Students occasionally graduate summa cum laude. Not quite an A+ average, but pretty close.

Edit: Nevermind, just looked into it and summa is an 8.5+ for common law. Closer to an A average.

Edited by chaboywb

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2 hours ago, erinl2 said:

When I was at U of T, graduating with honours required an A average. There were no A+ grades. In our cohort of 190 students, 16 of us were in the 'with honours' designation.  I didn't have straight A grades but I still had an A average. My guess is that that was the case with the others as well. As to your question, I would imagine that it is a result of both, although I think a certain level of intelligence and ability to do well on law school exams and papers is more important than the level of hard work. There will always be students who work very hard but won't achieve A grades, and there will always be students who don't have to work hard to achieve those same A's. 

If I recall, U of T only requires an A average in two of your three years in particular.

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7 minutes ago, setto said:

As a side note, and your experience may be different, but the only A+ law students I've ever met had their sites set on academia and had no real desire to practice. 

My experience is different. I know at least three of us who could at the very least challenge for an A+ average by the time we graduate (or could have by middle of 2L, I’m not sure how last semester went for the others), and of the three of us, only one of us has any real interest in academia. 

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The three medallists in my year are all currently practicing law, 12 years out. But none had an A+ average, despite having more A+ grades than any other grades. 

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Some combination of intelligence, work ethic, typing speed, genuine interest in the content, wise course selection and luck.

There are so few people with grades like that that it would be difficult for a person to know enough of them to pick up trends. A professor would probably be better situated to provide specific insight as to the characteristics of the top students they have encountered.

From my limited experience, it seems like most of the medal contenders have what appears to be a significantly above average interest in the content.

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15 hours ago, Toad said:

Some combination of intelligence, work ethic, typing speed, genuine interest in the content, wise course selection and luck.

When you talk about wise course selection, do you mean picking courses which gunners wouldn't typically take?

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