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Mature Student Applicants

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I applied to McGill Law for Fall 2020 as a mature student and was wondering what my fellow mature students are like. Where do you come from, what are your backgrounds, why law, why now, etc.

I'm Canadian military, coming up on eight years with two deployments under my belt. Lots of work with NGOs, some work with local authorities in disaster relief. Looking to switch careers because my back and knees shouldn't hurt as much as they do for my age (only partially kidding). No LSAT due to work schedule this year, strong PS and LoRs.

What about you?

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21 hours ago, TotallyBucked said:

I applied to McGill Law for Fall 2020 as a mature student and was wondering what my fellow mature students are like. Where do you come from, what are your backgrounds, why law, why now, etc.

I'm Canadian military, coming up on eight years with two deployments under my belt. Lots of work with NGOs, some work with local authorities in disaster relief. Looking to switch careers because my back and knees shouldn't hurt as much as they do for my age (only partially kidding). No LSAT due to work schedule this year, strong PS and LoRs.

What about you?

I'm not a mature student applicant (I'm actually finishing my degree this December) but I just wanted to say that your career sounds incredible so far. Thank you for your service and work with NGOs and on disaster relief. We need more people like you.

 

Good luck this year!

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I applied to uOttawa as a mature student. Despite my low LSAT (148), my LLM from Germany might help me secure a seat, what do you say? I would love to hear your thoughts

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2 hours ago, rodin48 said:

I applied to uOttawa as a mature student. Despite my low LSAT (148), my LLM from Germany might help me secure a seat, what do you say? I would love to hear your thoughts

LLM won't overcome a 148 barring an accomodation issue.

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On 11/10/2019 at 8:52 PM, pzabbythesecond said:

I'm not a mature student applicant (I'm actually finishing my degree this December) but I just wanted to say that your career sounds incredible so far. Thank you for your service and work with NGOs and on disaster relief. We need more people like you.

 

Good luck this year!

Thanks! Much appreciated. Hopefully the admissions board agrees with you enough to overlook my aggressively average 3.1 GPA

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Mature student here. Graduated from business school, worked five years in labour relations for public sector trade union. Experience lobbying all levels of government in Canada, Aus, UK. Worked on passion projects in business related to music that have taken me around the globe. Pedagogical publications, experience teaching university level.  Lived / worked / studied on six continents. Studied at four universities in Halifax, Toronto, London, Sao Paulo. English/French/Portuguese. Not sure about "stats".  

 

 

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Good morning! Does anyone know whether McGill begins admitting Mature students as soon as the first round (late December)? I remember reading that UBC makes decisions about their Discretionary category in May. I know that Discretionary and Mature are not equivalents. Just wondering whether I should definitely not expect an answer until the spring.

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2 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Best to check with them, but I believe the mature students aren't considered until April. Or even May.

You have more experience on which to judge this, of course, and if true, it could be important information for some candidates. But I'll bet McGill would reply that the order files are read is not based on category (with the exception of cégep applications, which arrive in March), and that the timing of offers is done case-by-case, more or less as files are read.

That said, there is a strong intuitive case for what you suggest, since the website tells us that many mature candidates are interviewed, and interviews take place between March and May (resulting, I suppose, in April-June offers of admission).  At the same time, though, the site doesn't seem to be saying that all eligible mature candidates must be interviewed, and it also says that university applicants may also be interviewed. So there seems to be some wiggle room there. 

McGill requires you to apply as a mature student if you are "an individual who has interrupted his or her formal education for a minimum of five years," and they give you the same deadlines as everyone else, save for cégep applicants. Basically, if you are in the mature category, you're likely older than average and have been doing something different than most over the last few years.  Now, one might argue that it would be unjust to put off consideration of an entire category of applications based primarily on their age and experience, while forcing them to disclose those same things in order to apply. I'm having trouble imagining a law school engaging in that kind of practice. 

I'm exploring that argument, by the way, not making it, and maybe I'm missing some important details. Or maybe the fact that I'm making a normative case is already missing the point. :-) 

Since mature candidates are those who been out of school for at least five years, I would agree that caution is warranted overall when the geezers start thinking of returning to school in so demanding a program as Law.  But let's also imagine someone, required to apply as mature but who would have been a university applicant six months earlier, who has a stellar file from the admissions committee point of view. Why put off reading that file and making an offer until April/May, when you would have done so in January/February for someone a year younger?

What am I missing here?

Edited by GreyDude
punctuation

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2 minutes ago, GreyDude said:

Since mature candidates are those who been out of school for at least five years, I would agree that caution is warranted overall when the geezers start thinking of returning to school in so demanding a program as Law.

This is incredibly insulting. I'm hoping you didn't mean it as it came across, so I'll give you a chance to reconsider.

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3 minutes ago, GreyDude said:

What am I missing here?

There are more or less reserved spots across the categories, as I understand it. That's what you're missing.

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20 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

This is incredibly insulting. I'm hoping you didn't mean it as it came across, so I'll give you a chance to reconsider.

I will be applying to law school next year, in the mature category. Hence the moniker. I was poking fun at myself. 

Edited by GreyDude
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19 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

This is incredibly insulting. I'm hoping you didn't mean it as it came across, so I'll give you a chance to reconsider.

I think GreyDude is him/herself a geezer. I took it as a lighthearted comment!

Edit: Confirmed above!

18 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

There are more or less reserved spots across the categories, as I understand it. That's what you're missing.

According to McGill's website, " There is no predetermined number of mature candidates admitted in a given year."

 

22 minutes ago, GreyDude said:

McGill requires you to apply as a mature student if you are "an individual who has interrupted his or her formal education for a minimum of five years," and they give you the same deadlines as everyone else, (save for cégep applicants). Basically, if you are in the mature category, you're likely older than average and have been doing something different than most over the last few years.  Now, one might argue that it would be unjust to put off consideration of an entire category of applications based primarily on their age and experience, while forcing them to disclose those same things in order to apply. I'm having trouble imagining a law school engaging in that kind of practice. 

 I was thinking the same thing.

Edited by fitzroy
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I can assure you that McGill (or any law school that takes their class quality seriously) would not forego a candidate by intentionally looking at their profile too late based on what category applicant they are. I don't know what mechanism they have in place to combat this, but I have faith that they do have one.

 

Good luck @GreyDude, thanks for the clarification!

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55 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

I can assure you that McGill (or any law school that takes their class quality seriously) would not forego a candidate by intentionally looking at their profile too late based on what category applicant they are. I don't know what mechanism they have in place to combat this, but I have faith that they do have one.

 

I'm quite sure you're right.   Like you, I really do have trouble imagining a school of McGill's caliber having any admissions practices that would either disadvantage applicants or potentially diminish the quality of the class. 

55 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Good luck @GreyDude, thanks for the clarification!

Thanks! It's going to take some planning, but next fall I'm hoping all my ducks will be in a row so that I can make my applications. (And I'm sure the expression "ducks in a row" will help solidify my geezer status!)

Cheers!

Edited by GreyDude

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My Admit Type on Minerva is showing as "Ontario University/College". I vaguely remember seeing "Mature" in that field previously. I'm thinking of giving the office a call tomorrow to find out why that is. But I was wondering if any fellow mature applicant is seeing the same thing? Maybe I imagined seeing "Mature" there before.

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19 hours ago, fitzroy said:

My Admit Type on Minerva is showing as "Ontario University/College". I vaguely remember seeing "Mature" in that field previously. I'm thinking of giving the office a call tomorrow to find out why that is. But I was wondering if any fellow mature applicant is seeing the same thing? Maybe I imagined seeing "Mature" there before.

How long have you been out of school for? McGill may have thrown you back into the regular admit category if you didn't meet their definition of "mature" student.

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1 hour ago, artsydork said:

How long have you been out of school for? McGill may have thrown you back into the regular admit category if you didn't meet their definition of "mature" student.

I've been out of school for 7 years.

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Just now, fitzroy said:

I've been out of school for 7 years.

So clearly mature! Give them a call to be sure :)

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1 minute ago, artsydork said:

So clearly mature! Give them a call to be sure :)

Thank you for the advice! Will definitely check in with them :) 

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