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capitalttruth

Typos in Personal Statements

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I (mistakenly) submitted my applications about a month ago because I operated under the erroneous assumption that you could still edit your PS's after you submitted your apps. I was under this assumption because I noticed that my LSAT scores and transcripts weren't showing up after my requests had gone out and so I sort of panicked. Anyway, the PS's I submitted I was ultimately happy with because I spent a long time reviewing them and editing them. However, after sending off my PS's I noticed that each statement had 1-2 typos/proofreading errors in them. As I look back on it now, I'm a little nervous about whether these proofreading errors will hurt my chances. I don't have a stellar cGPA due to extenuating health circumstances (as part of my Access application). I called Queens, explained the situation and they said they would accept the letter I was intending to send without errors and attach it to my file, but I don't know if this ultimately means they will review the letter I sent in over the one I uploaded to OLSAS. 

Anyway, I'm just wondering if these errors will ultimately hurt my chances because of my mediocre cGPA. I'm a little worried because I thought I really worked hard to improve my application this year, and I think that I have an overall strong application if not for these typos.

Edited by capitalttruth

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A few minor typos aren’t going to make or break an application in my opinion. The dominant force behind your application will be your stats and extenuating circumstances. 
 

At this point in time I would advise you refrain from reading over your application materials. It’s just setting you up for worry about things which cannot really be changed, which in my view is not helpful. 
 

Best of luck this cycle. 

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4 hours ago, capitalttruth said:

I (mistakenly) submitted my applications about a month ago because I operated under the erroneous assumption that you could still edit your PS's after you submitted your apps. I was under this assumption because I noticed that my LSAT scores and transcripts weren't showing up after my requests had gone out and so I sort of panicked. Anyway, the PS's I submitted I was ultimately happy with because I spent a long time reviewing them and editing them. However, after sending off my PS's I noticed that each statement had 1-2 typos/proofreading errors in them. As I look back on it now, I'm a little nervous about whether these proofreading errors will hurt my chances. I don't have a stellar cGPA due to extenuating health circumstances (as part of my Access application). I called Queens, explained the situation and they said they would accept the letter I was intending to send without errors and attach it to my file, but I don't know if this ultimately means they will review the letter I sent in over the one I uploaded to OLSAS. 

Anyway, I'm just wondering if these errors will ultimately hurt my chances because of my mediocre cGPA. I'm a little worried because I thought I really worked hard to improve my application this year, and I think that I have an overall strong application if not for these typos.

No one can tell you if those errors will hurt your chance. However, I don't think a few typos wshould not be a deciding factor.

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I don't have any "proof" for this, but in my opinion, as long as they were genuine typos/proofreading errors you should be fine. If you mistakenly used 'their/they're/there', 'aloud/allowed', 'commitee/committee' etc. then I think that would look way worse. 

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6 hours ago, student0033 said:

I don't have any "proof" for this, but in my opinion, as long as they were genuine typos/proofreading errors you should be fine. If you mistakenly used 'their/they're/there', 'aloud/allowed', 'commitee/committee' etc. then I think that would look way worse. 

This is a weird theory and I don’t agree with it. Mixing up homonyms and spelling errors are about the same level of error, and one certainly isn’t “way worse” than the other. 

OP, I wouldn’t worry about it. Everyone makes errors when they’re writing. It’s preferable to avoid them, but not worth stressing about ones you’ve already sent out into the world. 

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On 11/9/2019 at 11:51 AM, Luckycharm said:

No one can tell you if those errors will hurt your chance. However, I don't think a few typos wshould not be a deciding factor.

I see what you did there.

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I had 2 minor typo's in my personal statement and still got in to all Ontario schools. My LSAT and GPA were both above what they look for though. 

They were something like a forgotten word, for example: "During high, I taught XYZ...." the forgotten word is school. They were not errors of substance like their instead of there. 

Edited by advantagepackage

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14 hours ago, student0033 said:

I don't have any "proof" for this, but in my opinion, as long as they were genuine typos/proofreading errors you should be fine. If you mistakenly used 'their/they're/there', 'aloud/allowed', 'commitee/committee' etc. then I think that would look way worse. 

This comment made me think that "commitee" was a word and I was messing up by only using "committee" for my entire life. 

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3 hours ago, advantagepackage said:

I had 2 minor typo's in my personal statement and still got in to all Ontario schools. My LSAT and GPA were both above what they look for though. 

They were something like a forgotten word, for example: "During high, I taught XYZ...." the forgotten word is school. They were not errors of substance like their instead of there. 

Count yourself lucky your typo had not also replaced "during" with "while".

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