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Create Your Own New OCI Process

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20 minutes ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

Nepotism and social class would govern hiring.

Completely true, but at least nobody would be stressed. Nobody has ever found Daddy finding them a job at Cravath stressful. 

Stress over this kind of stuff is a very 20th century problem. Before that, all the peasants were too busy trying not to die of dysentery to whine about what a fucked up process the 2L recruit is. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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3 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Completely true, but at least nobody would be stressed. Nobody has ever found Daddy finding them a job at Cravath stressful. 

Stress over this kind of stuff is a very 20th century problem. Before that, all the peasants were too busy trying not to die of dysentery to whine about what a fucked up process the 2L recruit is. 

Yeah, I just don’t think the level of distress we see around OCIs* is a function of how hard it is to do a day of interviews. Those same kids will end up getting comfortable spending 10 hours on a Saturday fielding calls and turning drafts. They’re all pretty much capable. The distress is a function of something much more social and psychological, and you won’t reduce it unless you address those issues.

*To the lurkers reading who aren’t yet in law or are in 1L: Not everyone, not even all K-JDs get that distressed. While it does generally get a bit messy, and some do go off the rails, there is no need to be fatalistic about that. 

Edited by theycancallyouhoju

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The guy who went the most nuts on this forum had job experience. Some people just aren't built for the 2L recruit (or Bay Street for that matter). It happens. If you want to rejig a process to address them, just wrap the universe in bubble wrap while you're at it.

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3 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

The guy who went the most nuts on this forum had job experience. Some people just aren't built for the 2L recruit (or Bay Street for that matter). It happens. If you want to rejig a process to address them, just wrap the universe in bubble wrap while you're at it.

I’m not going to pretend there aren’t exceptions. My bottom line point is that changing the procedural aspects won’t, in literally any event, remove the types of anxiety we see. Second order point is that people with prior careers seemed demonstrably less distressed on average, and there are good reasons to ground that. 

Edited by theycancallyouhoju

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I’m only half joking, by the way.

To be explicit, engrained class structures are wrong and bad (and I have benefited from the relative meritocracy of big law hiring). 

But no matter what you do, this generation of people will find it stressful. It’s just a symptom of society’s broader problem accepting that things are, on net, much better than they used to be. And because we can’t accept that things are better than they used to be, we look for stressors where none (or at least fewer) exist.

Students think that the 2L recruit should be stressful, so it is. Students think that exams should be stressful, so they are. you could chop the 2L recruit and adopt @Uriel’s system, and students would think that it should be stressful, so it would be. 

The problem here isn’t the system – that much should be obvious, because it’s an objectively easy recruit. It’s the students. @theycancallyouhoju’s proposal addresses that to a point (in an admittedly unrealistic way), which is why it would likely be the most successful. The other way to address that is to just get rid of the students, and let nepotism and engrained class structures reign. Hence my facetious suggestion. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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Have a metric of demonstrable skill, and have a basis for recruitment other than one or two dimensions (interviews + grades). Data-driven hiring has revolutionized recruitment elsewhere and part of it is an understanding that grades or 30 min interviews do not reflect total capacity of a person. 

Examples I will draw from the tech sector, both showing why there are multiple problems with conventional recruitments of any kind.

Friend of mine was a C student in CS who was very diligent and very good at building lateral skillsets for programming. Got hired at a big NYC tech company at age 25 starting 200K. Part of it was recognizing that school did not teach or demonstrate the total ability of a person. 

Another was a female CS engineer, who had stellar grades. Very smart person, but during the group interview with Google she was expected to work on a project with others. They all were subjectively dismissive of her because of obviously sexist reasons despite her contributing significantly to it. Anyways she had won a major hackathon a year later and came back to be hired at a much higher salary.

Edited by mazzystar
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