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2 hours ago, sarahchambers22 said:

Is being the first in my family to attend professional school an acceptable consideration for part b?

I really don't see how it is given the fact that the majority of the population has not attended professional school. First in your family to attend high school or post-secondary - maybe... as it could highlight other factors such as equity, socioeconomics, unique life experiences, work experiences, etc. 

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Sorry to hi-jack this thread somewhat but I'm wondering if it's even worth applying to Osgoode under Part B considerations for disability, mental health, and life experiences. I gather that my 3.3 GPA would be much too low for Osgoode even under Part B consideration. Wondering if I should spend the extra 100 bucks and go through with it or just save my money on applying to schools I have more of a realistic shot of getting in to.

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9 hours ago, capitalttruth said:

Sorry to hi-jack this thread somewhat but I'm wondering if it's even worth applying to Osgoode under Part B considerations for disability, mental health, and life experiences. I gather that my 3.3 GPA would be much too low for Osgoode even under Part B consideration. Wondering if I should spend the extra 100 bucks and go through with it or just save my money on applying to schools I have more of a realistic shot of getting in to.

Hey, I had a lower CGPA than you but I got into Osgoode. I had some very significant family and mental health factors that impacted my GPA that I explained in Part B.  If you have any questions  send me a message! 

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Also sorry to hijack this thread, but am wondering: can one use the part B 'performance considerations' to emphasize a significant upward trend in GPA even if you don't have a good reason for initial poor performance in university?

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On 10/14/2019 at 1:56 PM, Pete said:

Also sorry to hijack this thread, but am wondering: can one use the part B 'performance considerations' to emphasize a significant upward trend in GPA even if you don't have a good reason for initial poor performance in university?

I mean Pete, you can certainly try. Just make it well-written. 

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True. I've read some conflicting advice on discussing bad grades/etc in the personal statement itself.  Some say don't waste your space on it; others say ignoring it would be a red flag. In my PS I focussed 100% on strengths/successes, so I thought I might include an explanation of the bad grades in part B.

But I don't want to be wasting the adcom's time if they're only looking for big-ticket excuses... Mine would be more about what I've learned from/how I've grown academically since my first year. I'm not fudging a narrative, because I have progressed since then and have the transcript to prove it, but my explanation isn't going to be like "I killed a man in Reno, did 12 years in Folsom, caught a steamship to Senegal, walked across the Sahara desert, discovered a secret tomb, then travelled back in time to prevent the Boer War--and that's why I wasn't so hot on the books in freshman year."

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13 hours ago, Pete said:

True. I've read some conflicting advice on discussing bad grades/etc in the personal statement itself.  Some say don't waste your space on it; others say ignoring it would be a red flag. In my PS I focussed 100% on strengths/successes, so I thought I might include an explanation of the bad grades in part B.

But I don't want to be wasting the adcom's time if they're only looking for big-ticket excuses... Mine would be more about what I've learned from/how I've grown academically since my first year. I'm not fudging a narrative, because I have progressed since then and have the transcript to prove it, but my explanation isn't going to be like "I killed a man in Reno, did 12 years in Folsom, caught a steamship to Senegal, walked across the Sahara desert, discovered a secret tomb, then travelled back in time to prevent the Boer War--and that's why I wasn't so hot on the books in freshman year."

Honestly, include it. This seems completely fine

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On 9/26/2019 at 12:43 PM, sarahchambers22 said:

Is being the first in my family to attend professional school an acceptable consideration for part b?

No.

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On 10/14/2019 at 1:56 PM, Pete said:

Also sorry to hijack this thread, but am wondering: can one use the part B 'performance considerations' to emphasize a significant upward trend in GPA even if you don't have a good reason for initial poor performance in university?

No. An upward trend just means you got better at your studies. That is not any of the folllowing " if they apply: equity factors, work/life experience, performance considerations and diversity factors.". Double check the website. 

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13 hours ago, Ladybug8712 said:

No. An upward trend just means you got better at your studies. That is not any of the folllowing " if they apply: equity factors, work/life experience, performance considerations and diversity factors.". Double check the website. 

How would you define "performance considerations"?

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According to the Osgoode application on OLSAS, "performance considerations" means "special circumstances or non-academic commitments that negatively impacted a portion of your academic performance". The examples they give are:

Quote
  • significant involvement in student government or high-level sports
  • significant health issues
  • lack of accommodation for a disability that impeded LSAT performance
  • illness/death of a parent or close family member

The list is not exhaustive. But bear in mind that, in my opinion and in my experience, these circumstances need to be meaningfully impactful. Working full-time during school is not a performance consideration. Having difficulty adjusting to the rigours of university in first year is not a performance consideration.

As an aside, I would also add that "significant involvement in student government" would likely not be at the level of a student club or the like. I always took it to mean (and considered it to mean, when I was a member of the adcom) high-level student government, like student union executives; or significant involvement provincial/national student organizations at a high level, like being a member of the CFS executive committee. Those commitments are: (1) difficult to get, because they typically require convincing thousands to vote for you, and thus take a lot of work to achieve; and are (2) actually quite time-consuming, require frequent travel, and sometimes necessitate dropping down to part-time status to be able to fully deal with the portfolio.

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It must be fate that I stumbled back upon this thread before submitting! Much appreciated @Ryn

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