Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hey guy so I was wondering what are everyone’s thoughts on the electronic LSAT. I am currently studying for the November lsat and my diagnostic was really low around 148 but I had no idea about what type of questions are in the test. Right now I’m PTin around 162-167 up and down however, I just took the 2007 June online and scored only 157. I was to reach 170+ by test day but I’m really worried it won’t be possible because the whole electronic component is throwing me off. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to take over this topic, but I too would like to hear about how others felt about the electronic LSAT.  Especially in regard to the questions below:

Was it a similar format to the KHAN academy LSAT exams that you would do on the computer?

In reading comprehension, were you able to see the entire article on the screen as you saw and answered the questions?

 

Miasky91:  To answer your question:  The "type of questions" will be the same on the electronic exam as they are on your practice exams.   I am not able to clarify about the formatting of the electronic screen though, so hopefully someone else can give us some input.

Edited by JMR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JMR said:

Was it a similar format to the KHAN academy LSAT exams that you would do on the computer?

LSAC has a few tests available online for free that are identical to the digital LSAT. Check them out here: https://familiar.lsac.org

1 hour ago, JMR said:

In reading comprehension, were you able to see the entire article on the screen as you saw and answered the questions?

Yes

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took the LSAT in July and was one of the test centres that got the digital exam. I personally found it way better than the traditional paper exam. I personally didn't have any issues with it, but i've heard of people who did.

I especially appreciated the timer in the top right which said exactly how much time you have left in the section. One thing I did which I found helpful (although I realize it may not be for everyone), was I tapped on the time to hide it for most of the section to prevent me from constantly checking on it. Then, when there was 5ish minutes left in the section, I would tap it again to make sure I filled in all the questions and got to any questions that I may have flagged to review.

Overall, in my one experience with it, I found that there were no hiccups and I actually found the timer and other aspects (such as highlighting, changing fonts, screen layout, tapping the bubbles as opposed to filling them in with a pencil, etc.) of the digital version to be beneficial to me. It's definitely not for everyone but I preferred it to the paper exam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Electronic pros:
Less time spent recording answers on bubble sheet.
Less room for error in recording incorrect answer.
Easy to go back and review flagged questions.
Timer is right there on the screen (which you can hide).  
5 minute warning on screen.  

Electronic cons:
I found digital reading harder, and it takes me more time.
Eye strain.
Ceiling light glares (I hated this).
Can't easily read the entire RC passage as one (you do have the option to "flip" between entire passage and questions, but I found that more annoying than scrolling).

Overall, I preferred digital.  Mostly because of the reduced error rate in transferring answers on paper, and the timer.  I budgeted my time so that I had 1 minute of "me time" at the end of section 1, 2, and 4 (I really needed it), and the timer allowed me to do that.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • Look, there is only one wrong question to ask about academic misconduct - and it's been asked here many times in the past. Do you really need to disclosure it? The answer is yes. Any time you are asked a direct question about this, you need to answer truthfully. Note that you'll also be asked when you apply to be licensed as a lawyer, assuming you get that far. Now kudos for the fact that you haven't asked that question, because when people do ask it often reveals a mindset that's not entirely in line with legal culture. But beyond answering this question which you haven't asked, no one here can comment definitively at all. I'm mainly answering to provide this context. I'm a criminal defence lawyer. And I'm frequently asked some variation of this question by clients - "will my past mistake stop me from doing X?" Again, it isn't often I have a definitive answer. But I've observed that many people who aren't defence lawyers like to get self-righteous when addressing this topic. It's human nature (though not the best part of human nature) to enjoy seeing other people suffer from mistakes that we ourselves have avoided. The Greeks understood this. And so in answer to an unanswerable question - how much will schools, the law society, etc. choose to care about this - it's likely you are going to get a lot of extreme replies that suggest you've permanently fucked your life. That doesn't make it true. I will observe that law schools have admitted students in the past who have been convicted of serious crimes, and so have law societies. Your individual situation is unique and I won't presume to suggest what will happen. But be honest in reply to any direct question - that's your obligation. How you choose to frame your experiences, or if you choose to highlight them at all beyond this, is entirely your choice. Don't lie about the past, because when you do that it creates new offences of dishonesty. But you also have no obligation to inhabit the identity full-time, as though you are permanently defined by your past. You're entitled to move on. And don't let anyone else imply otherwise. Good luck.
    • Ask for a coffee or lunch instead. Reiterate your interest in them and they should understand.
    • No one would be able to answer whether you have any chances at Canadian law schools or not. If you really reflect on your issues of academic misconduct and you are indeed serous about going to law schools, I would like to say that your personal statements may need to talk about your academic misconduct in the past and discuss how you personally or academically have grown by dealing with these wrongdoings. Good luck!  
    • How do I deal with conflicting dinner invitations?  I will be accepting the dinner with my first choice but I don't want to burn the other firms so early in the process.
    • So..I'll just start from the top. I was enrolled in a 2 year diploma at NAIT (Technical institute) my first semester there I was found guilty of academic misconduct, basically submitted the same assignment as another student (not trying to deny I was guilty) in my last semester of the 2 year diploma I was found guilty for the same thing. The first time I just got a letter on my file and an F on the assignment but the second time I was suspended from the institution for a year and received all F's for that semester on my transcript. This happen in 2014. After that year I enrolled at UofA in a sociology diploma and worked really hard to get a 3.8 (in my last 2 yrs) my cgpa is around 3.2 and an lsat score of 166. I have really good extracurriculars/volunteer experience in the community as well as references -I'm wanting to apply to the university of calgary and university of alberta faculty of law.        I know in most law school apps it asks you about your history with academic dishonesty and i guess what i'm asking is all things considered do i have even the slightest chance? PS guys i'm asking for honest advice PLEASE don't make me feel bad i feel really shitty about what i've done and can honestly say i'm a different person since then and have worked really hard in my undergrad. I've overcome a lot of hardships and personal situations these past few years that have also contributed to that growth (gave birth to my son in my fourth year while attending full time classes and have learned a lot about responsibility!)
×
×
  • Create New...