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Average OCIs received and Interview Prep Sources on Campus

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What is the UofT average for OCIs received? ALso, is it harder to get an OCI interview slot at UofT than at a different law school since firms will only interview 40-60 students and its harder to stand out as the top 40 or 60 at UofT than it is at some other law schools. Do law firms interview less at other places? 

 

Also how is everyone preparing for interviews? Upper-years? Should you ask people in your year to practice interview with? Ask Upper-years that went through the process? CDO? 

Edited by Newfoundland

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http://ultravires.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Ultra-Vires-Toronto-Summer-2019-Recruitment-Special.pdf

There are years of this. You can sift through the info. No idea why you would think UT students have a harder time getting OCIs when the school literally places the highest percentage of its students in jobs through OCIs. Seems quite the opposite.

Also you still need to calm down. Go to the CDO and do a mock interview if you want to see how helpful it is - there is literally nothing you will lose through that process. It sounds like you haven’t shed the desire for a list of actions you can take to secure a job. There is no list. Practice with whoever seems good at role playing an interview. Go to the CDO if you want to try it out. None of us can tell you who will be best suited to helping you.

Edited by theycancallyouhoju
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17 hours ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

http://ultravires.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Ultra-Vires-Toronto-Summer-2019-Recruitment-Special.pdf

There are years of this. You can sift through the info. No idea why you would think UT students have a harder time getting OCIs when the school literally places the highest percentage of its students in jobs through OCIs. Seems quite the opposite.

Also you still need to calm down. Go to the CDO and do a mock interview if you want to see how helpful it is - there is literally nothing you will lose through that process. It sounds like you haven’t shed the desire for a list of actions you can take to secure a job. There is no list. Practice with whoever seems good at role playing an interview. Go to the CDO if you want to try it out. None of us can tell you who will be best suited to helping you.

I dont think they tell you how many OCIs students get at UofT though, and I was no where close to the published statistics on #ofOCI offers to applications. I am no where close to 50-70%. 

 

Because it seems like UT students have the highest GPA/LSAT scores on average and that makes it harder to be in the top 60 students or top 40 students in the student body. 

 

Does the school still matter after OCIs? As in , granted the UofT name helped get you the OCI interview slot but after then does it still matter? 

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5 hours ago, Newfoundland said:

I dont think they tell you how many OCIs students get at UofT though, and I was no where close to the published statistics on #ofOCI offers to applications. I am no where close to 50-70%. 

 

Because it seems like UT students have the highest GPA/LSAT scores on average and that makes it harder to be in the top 60 students or top 40 students in the student body. 

 

Does the school still matter after OCIs? As in , granted the UofT name helped get you the OCI interview slot but after then does it still matter? 

There are definitely past editions that will tell you what percentage of the (reporting) student body got OCIs.

A higher percentage of UT students are hired than other schools. Whether you think that’s because UT students came into the school as better candidates, or because law firms are tricked into assuming they’re better candidates by the name UT, is your own call.

But why are you mulling this? You’ve applied already, no?  Just go through the process like we all do. 

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You're getting a lot of good advice here, and I can't add much to the factual replies regarding how UofT performs at OCIs. But I did want to say this much. It's a really unusual concern to be worried that being at U of T is somehow going to screw you for OCIs. As in, it's a really unusual concern. And the fact that you are drilling down so far to find anxieties that are so unusual probably just points to the fact that you really, really do need to calm down. Many of your posts relate to taking one thing that one person said to you and turning it into a issue out of nothing. And this on top of the fact that even if these were real issues, we're talking about things that are completely out of your control at this point. Is worrying about these invented problems really the best use of your time right now?

Seriously - try to relax. That's the best advice going.

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16 hours ago, Diplock said:

You're getting a lot of good advice here, and I can't add much to the factual replies regarding how UofT performs at OCIs. But I did want to say this much. It's a really unusual concern to be worried that being at U of T is somehow going to screw you for OCIs. As in, it's a really unusual concern. And the fact that you are drilling down so far to find anxieties that are so unusual probably just points to the fact that you really, really do need to calm down. Many of your posts relate to taking one thing that one person said to you and turning it into a issue out of nothing. And this on top of the fact that even if these were real issues, we're talking about things that are completely out of your control at this point. Is worrying about these invented problems really the best use of your time right now?

Seriously - try to relax. That's the best advice going.

Thank you. Do you have tips on relaxing during this process? How should I be preparing for interviews?

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The best advice is to relax. If you stress out and get super overwhelmed ahead of time, during the interview you are going to come across as super high-wound and neurotic.

No one wants to work with a person undergoing regular freakouts.

Whether you need to meditate, medicate, or run a mile every morning and cut out caffeine (or all of the above) you need to figure out how to manage your stress. 

What are you doing right now to accomplish that?

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1 hour ago, Hegdis said:

The best advice is to relax. If you stress out and get super overwhelmed ahead of time, during the interview you are going to come across as super high-wound and neurotic.

No one wants to work with a person undergoing regular freakouts.

Whether you need to meditate, medicate, or run a mile every morning and cut out caffeine (or all of the above) you need to figure out how to manage your stress. 

What are you doing right now to accomplish that?

 

I try not to think about it and worry about it but I also know I need to research and prep for interviews. I try and walk a bit (15-30 mins after/before dinner) but I feel like I am in a hurry when I walk.

I drink 2-3 cups of coffee daily but the caffeine doesn't seem to have the effect of giving me energy tbh unless I am drinking it at like 7pm and that's when I feel the caffeine effect late at night.   

What do you usually choose? Do you have tips on researching for interviews? 

 

Edited by Newfoundland

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3 hours ago, Newfoundland said:

 

I try not to think about it and worry about it but I also know I need to research and prep for interviews. I try and walk a bit (15-30 mins after/before dinner) but I feel like I am in a hurry when I walk.

I drink 2-3 cups of coffee daily but the caffeine doesn't seem to have the effect of giving me energy tbh unless I am drinking it at like 7pm and that's when I feel the caffeine effect late at night.   

What do you usually choose? Do you have tips on researching for interviews? 

 

I really think you would benefit from some professional help. Ideally someone who will give you tools to both recognize your stress and anxiety when it starts to overtake you, and how to deal with it when it does. This is on top of general routines that help calm you down.

I get it. I've been there. But you have a lot of life ahead of you. If having interviews gets you to this state, you will struggle in practice when stakes are high. Unfortunately many in our profession fall into that trap and lean on substances to help them through. Don't do that. 2-3 cups of coffee a day is a potential sign you're already starting to do that, especially since from what you said it's a maintenance drug for you now, not a booster.

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Stop drinking coffee and instead of walking, go for a run. You have a ton of nervous energy you need to 1. Expend and 2. Stop feeding. 

I am not going to internet diagnose you. But I want you to consider whether you are using this site for reassurance seeking and/or obsessive info checking. People who have Anxiety (capital A) fall into a number of recognizable patterns. One of those is obsessive information gathering, and one of those is reassurance seeking. These patterns address a sense of paralysis and mask the fact that you cannot move forward with decisions and have peace of mind.

If you find you cannot function - and even begin to panic - unless some one is constantly right there with you telling you that you are making all the right choices and setting out exactly what happens next, and assuring you it will all be ok, you are probably getting in over your head and Anxiety may be the culprit.

Anxiety is a real honest to goodness diagnosis along with Diabetes and Depression. If this is what you are dealing with, it’s  really time to stop feeding it and start treating it. 

You can feel better. This can get better. But get help.

 

Edit: in case this comes across as presumptuous, I have Anxiety. I treat it. Before I did, Life was pretty fucking shitty. So this is all with the very best wishes for you going forward if this is your particular demon. 

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Also read Hoju’s absolutely amazing response to one of your earlier threads here:

 

Now read it again.

And then one more time.

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I'd like to add that since you go to school in Ontario, you can access LSO's Member Assistance Program. It's easy to access, confidential, and it will get you speaking to someone a lot faster than if you go through whatever process UofT offers (probably. I've never gone to UofT. But the MAP is faster than any school I've ever attended). It's also free. I think contacting them could be a relatively easy, concrete step to take in managing the stress you are feeling. It's not a guaranteed solution, but it's been a really helpful resource for me.

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U of T also has a high percentage of people getting jobs through the OCIs because there's a lot of well-connected people for whom the OCIs are a formality. For OCIs focus on quality over quantity. You'll exhaust yourself if you focus on quantity. I didn't get a job through the OCIs so I can't really give any useful advice on how to get a job through the OCIs.

As for mental health, drinking lots of coffee is par for the course for professionals but if you are at a point where you get withdrawal symptoms (headaches, etc) then best to drink less of it and avoid those energy drinks (sugar and caffiene are how they actually keep you awake). Law School itself is not so grueling that you should be skipping sleep. Perhaps you should sleep more? Avoid alcohol, tobacco and other legal stimulants as well. Eat a decent breakfast if you need energy early in the day. Bring some soda or whatever if you have trouble staying awake in class. As of when I was at U of T, the counselling was only for emergencies and, generally, she was not the kind of counsellor who is, essentially, somebody you can talk to, because she knows that you are seeing her a maximum of six times. You might want to look into whether there's free or low cost options with either the city or the law society or if the free student healthcare covers some mental health care.

If you have clinical depression or anxiety meds can and do help and you don't need them forever. Certain kinds of stress (such as "finding a in law school job stress") can really screw things up. Especially when people go around saying "everybody who wants a job gets one through the OCIs" at U of T, when that is definitely not the case for those who are not well-connected.

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26 minutes ago, AnonLaw said:

U of T also has a high percentage of people getting jobs through the OCIs because there's a lot of well-connected people for whom the OCIs are a formality. For OCIs focus on quality over quantity. You'll exhaust yourself if you focus on quantity. I didn't get a job through the OCIs so I can't really give any useful advice on how to get a job through the OCIs.

As for mental health, drinking lots of coffee is par for the course for professionals but if you are at a point where you get withdrawal symptoms (headaches, etc) then best to drink less of it and avoid those energy drinks (sugar and caffiene are how they actually keep you awake). Law School itself is not so grueling that you should be skipping sleep. Perhaps you should sleep more? Avoid alcohol, tobacco and other legal stimulants as well. Eat a decent breakfast if you need energy early in the day. Bring some soda or whatever if you have trouble staying awake in class. As of when I was at U of T, the counselling was only for emergencies and, generally, she was not the kind of counsellor who is, essentially, somebody you can talk to, because she knows that you are seeing her a maximum of six times. You might want to look into whether there's free or low cost options with either the city or the law society or if the free student healthcare covers some mental health care.

If you have clinical depression or anxiety meds can and do help and you don't need them forever. Certain kinds of stress (such as "finding a in law school job stress") can really screw things up. Especially when people go around saying "everybody who wants a job gets one through the OCIs" at U of T, when that is definitely not the case for those who are not well-connected.

It sure feels like a different playground if you aren’t well-connected and rich. Hearing murmurs in the halls about whose Dad works where and who has family friends at which firms. The whole process feels very performative. 

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