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Why did I do poorly for OCIs?

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If you go to UBC now, and have all of your CV experience in BC, firms will notice that you have had all your life in BC, you did 1L in a non-BC school (which? if its TRU, Windsor, or Ottawa that may shed some light), and that you transferred and went back home to BC after 1L. 

The BC, all of your CV in BC, undergrad in BC -> another province for 1L -> back to BC after 1L, might turn off firms that you will once again go back to BC and want a job at home.

*This is only true if we are talking about Toronto OCI's.

Edited by almondbutter

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Unfortunately it was probably your Cover Letter and Resume. Even worse, the CDO offices really don’t know what firms are looking for. Keep your head up and don’t get discouraged. You still have an OCI which I’m sure you’ll kill and there are lots of great firms that don’t take summer students but have articling student applications open this summer (I.e Lerners). If things don’t work out, recover, regroup and work on your ETCs and other things to bump up your resume. 2L jobs are not the end all and be all and you’ll still be a super successful lawyer no matter where you end up. 

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16 minutes ago, potatoqueen said:

Even worse, the CDO offices really don’t know what firms are looking for. 

I don't know what's going on at your school, but at any of the schools that I've worked at, the CDO has gone to pretty extensive efforts to ensure (to the extent possible that they can with something subjective like cover letters) that they do, indeed, understand what firms are looking for.  Furthermore, I'm told by our CDO that they often see cover letters that are poorly written and help to make those sorts of changes.  To the extent that they are doing that sort of work, they are definitely inching those letters towards what firms are looking for, since that presumably includes clear and grammatically correct writing.

Edited by ProfReader
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3 hours ago, ProfReader said:

I don't know what's going on at your school, but at any of the schools that I've worked at, the CDO has gone to pretty extensive efforts to ensure (to the extent possible that they can with something subjective like cover letters) that they do, indeed, understand what firms are looking for.  Furthermore, I'm told by our CDO that they often see cover letters that are poorly written and help to make those sorts of changes.  To the extent that they are doing that sort of work, they are definitely inching those letters towards what firms are looking for, since that presumably includes clear and grammatically correct writing.

Agreed. Also I’m at UBC (where OP also seems to attend) and I’ve had several recruiters at big firms tell me, unprompted, that we have a great CSO that understands exactly what the firms want. Probably since our CSO people have worked at large firms. 

Just wanted to add that since I don’t think it’s helpful for OP to go down the path of thinking an incompetent CSO was his or her issue. 

Edited by Starling
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If OP went to TRU in 1L then UBC in 2L, I'd assume they just didn't have strong cover letters/resumes. I'm in 3L at TRU and received 9 Vancouver OCIs with the following grades: A-, B+, B+, B, B, B, B.

I had heard rumours that transferring to UBC from TRU/UVic looks bad to employers unless you had a compelling reason to transfer (family issues, you got married, etc.). I have no idea how true that is, so yeah.

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On 9/18/2019 at 6:26 AM, ArchivesandMuseums said:

It looks like the OP went to TRU law for 1 L, and then transferred to somewhere, probably UBC law.

 

19 hours ago, almondbutter said:

If you go to UBC now, and have all of your CV experience in BC, firms will notice that you have had all your life in BC, you did 1L in a non-BC school (which? if its TRU, Windsor, or Ottawa that may shed some light), and that you transferred and went back home to BC after 1L. 

The BC, all of your CV in BC, undergrad in BC -> another province for 1L -> back to BC after 1L, might turn off firms that you will once again go back to BC and want a job at home.

*This is only true if we are talking about Toronto OCI's.

 

I ended up in Alberta, and then applied for the transfer back to UBC. 

 

Thank you all for your replies, I appreciate it 

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The hiring process is generally a black box from the applicant side. There are things you'll just never know.

My OCI experience is a counter-anecdote to some of the other posts but be warned it's dated by 6 years.

Like you I transferred to BC, UVic in my case, after doing 1L OOP.  My 1L grades were average (worse than yours IMO), I applied broadly, and received 4 OCIs.  That went to 2 in-firms.  It became 3 after I sent an email to one firm I didn't hear from expressing continued interest (something like: I know your schedule is likely full, however, if a space were to open up, I would still be interested).  I had no in-firm experience, just volunteering at legal clinics.  I think I had 2 lunches in addition to the interviews.

3 in-firms turned into 0 offers. 

Now that I think about it, it was a gruelling time full of never ending uncertainty.  Looking back, I would tell myself, "You know nothing (john snow). First, you have a warped and destructive understanding of success and failure.  Second, you have no idea whether going 0/3 means you dodged 3 bullets.  You really, really don't.  And third, you're going to find articles whether you want to or not."

The last one is technically not true but believing it really helped me keep chugging along.

Best of luck on your OCI.  Remember to take a moment to breathe when your body stiffens so you can relax and be kind to yourself.

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I transferred to Osgoode with a B+ average (A-, A-, B+, B+, B+, B) and got 1 OCI.

Still don;'t know how to process it

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23 minutes ago, jayoh said:

I transferred to Osgoode with a B+ average (A-, A-, B+, B+, B+, B) and got 1 OCI.

Still don;'t know how to process it

from Ottawa?

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37 minutes ago, jayoh said:

I transferred to Osgoode with a B+ average (A-, A-, B+, B+, B+, B) and got 1 OCI.

Still don;'t know how to process it

Did you have the blank page problem with Toronto OCI apps? Typos on cover letters? 

Edited by harveyspecter993

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I am also a transfer student and my grades were A, A, B+, B+, B+, C+ and I got only 4 Ocis, mostly regional firms. I Wonder if the C+ really hurt my chances? My overall average was still a B+. 

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1 minute ago, Bubblegum said:

I am also a transfer student and my grades were A, A, B+, B+, B+, C+ and I got only 4 Ocis, mostly regional firms. I Wonder if the C+ really hurt my chances? My overall average was still a B+. 

People with C+s got sisters so no.

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Just now, Bubblegum said:

I am also a transfer student and my grades were A, A, B+, B+, B+, C+ and I got only 4 Ocis, mostly regional firms. I Wonder if the C+ really hurt my chances? My overall average was still a B+. 

For the purposes of this thread, it would probably be helpful to say which school you transferred from and to. 

I don't think the C+ is that harmful. I had one in an important course and did quite well for OCIs, and not from Osgoode/UofT.

From this thread and past ones, it does seem like transfer students do worse than expected at OCIs, but there's not much of a sample size to go off of. It could be other factors. And yes, @Luckycharm is the exception.

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1 hour ago, chaboywb said:

For the purposes of this thread, it would probably be helpful to say which school you transferred from and to. 

I don't think the C+ is that harmful. I had one in an important course and did quite well for OCIs, and not from Osgoode/UofT.

From this thread and past ones, it does seem like transfer students do worse than expected at OCIs, but there's not much of a sample size to go off of. It could be other factors. And yes, @Luckycharm is the exception.

U of T does not have C+

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1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

U of T does not have C+

What does this have to do with anything?

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1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

U of T does not have C+

Sure. I'm saying that I had an outlier grade but still did fine despite not going to a school where firms interview 40-60 students.

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I think that most likely what happened is that when you transferred you were competing with all the students who did their 1L in the law school you transferred to and employers probably trusted those grades more than the grades from the school that you transferred from. Simple as that. Very unfortunate though, but don't let it get you too down. Still plenty of other firms out there. 

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