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lawstudentmikescott

I don’t know what I’m doing 1L

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Albeit that school started a few weeks ago, I feel that I have done a great amount of reading. 

Ive stayed on top of most of the readings, but I am approaching it like undergrad. I don’t think this method is good because I don’t really know what I am supposed to take notes of (a part from making case briefs). 

I tried to refrain from looking at summaries too early but I fell a little behind today and gave in. The summary was clear and told me what I needed to know about certain cases. 

I feel that going forward, I should just do the reading then look at the notes in the summary and add whatever else I may need to, in regard to that reading. I find that making notes while reading (without knowing exactly what to take notes of) is a bad idea. 

What do you think? I just don’t know if I am going in the right direction in terms of knowing what I need to know, opposed to what I think I need to know. 

 

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This early on the most important notes you’re going to be taking will be during/after class when the professor tells you what is important about the case. Whether you make those notes from scratch or starting with an existing summary and amending it as you go is up to you.  If the act of fully writing out summaries helps you learn then do it. If you learn more from reading over and editing do that. The only thing that matters is your personal learning process because the summary will not be graded and doesn’t matter.

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Everybody feels the same about law school readings that you are you feeling when they first start.

Most cases you are reading are older seminal cases anyways so they will not be easy to read.

Definitely grab summaries or read case briefs online if they help you understand those cases...that's not a bad thing to do. 

Law school isn't necessarily being able to read everything...it's about knowing what to look for, how to be efficient, being able to extract the issues and rules from a case, and then being able to apply that rule elsewhere.

Again, your feelings are normal - good luck. 

Edited by Lawstudent3210
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1L here! I feel the same way. I’ve been reading cases and doing my own briefs, then looking at summaries online to make sure I understood the main issues/rule and adding anything I might have missed. Then I bring them to class for discussion and add anything my prof says.

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Network with 3Ls, those chill, suave and all around decent folks at your law school. Ask them for advice. Capitalize on said advice.

2Ls right now will be too much in the 1L personality and mood. 

Also enjoy school, meet interesting people, and so-on. 

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6 hours ago, mazzystar said:

Network with 3Ls, those chill, suave and all around decent folks at your law school. Ask them for advice. Capitalize on said advice.

2Ls right now will be too much in the 1L personality and mood. 

Also enjoy school, meet interesting people, and so-on. 

I agree. don’t talk to the 2Ls just yet. They’re balls of job-seeking stress. Talk to the 3Ls 

Edited by healthlaw
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I found that in 1L it helped me to read case summaries before, rather than after, I read a case. This way I read the case fully knowing what was going on and it helped me pick up on the nuances better.

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On ‎9‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 2:06 AM, mazzystar said:

Network with 3Ls, those chill, suave and all around decent folks at your law school. Ask them for advice. Capitalize on said advice.

This really helped me

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