Jump to content
Suzanne

Toxic workplace

Recommended Posts

^ I guess. I think he was just making a point about some of the challenges of being "the Boss." My point was to acknowledge that Diplock has a practice where he's sustaining himself and others, which makes congratulations appropriate. It's easy to sit back and criticize someone who's taking on all the risk, putting their personal and professional lives on the line to open a business and try to make a living. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BabyRhinoRainbow said:

are you kidding me? It sounds like he is one pregnancy away from a human rights complaint.

Way to miss the point entirely.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BabyRhinoRainbow said:

are you kidding me? It sounds like he is one pregnancy away from a human rights complaint.

I took this as a joke. If Rino wants to come back and clarify that he intended to suggest I'm clueless as an entrepreneur, I suppose I'll engage with the critique at that time. But for now, I think my quick response squad can stand down. All the same, I appreciate the defence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suzanne, you've gotta stop caring. I've been reading that advice for weeks, and its only just sinking in. Keep focusing in on your insignificance in terms of the importance of your paper pushing. It'll make the days easier to bear. But it might take a minute for the realization to click in gradually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I feel like there was actually a good post about the insignificance of articling and associate-level paper-pushing from someone like Diplock, Uriel, or Hedgis a while back (in a good way, so as to lessen stress and put things in perspective). Anyone know where that one went? 

Edited by spicyfoodftw
missed a word.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Diplock said:

I took this as a joke. If Rino wants to come back and clarify that he intended to suggest I'm clueless as an entrepreneur, I suppose I'll engage with the critique at that time. But for now, I think my quick response squad can stand down. All the same, I appreciate the defence.

she, thanks

Edited by BabyRhinoRainbow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, BabyRhinoRainbow said:

she, thanks

She. Sorry. And way to make that point but still not clarify if you were joking in the first place!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jokes or not, you could probably use some on-call HR advice at least, if you're not at the point where you need an HR person.

The reality is, no matter how much you love your wife, she could be putting your entire business at risk if she's creating an unsafe work environment, harassing, discriminating, etc. Some employment laws exempt small businesses, but a lot do not.

Edited by Jaggers
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Diplock said:

...

So let's turn this on its head for a moment, okay? Let's just take it for granted and assumed that your boss has a somewhat insane wife helping run his practice, who he depends on and who he presumably married because he's in love with her, faults and all, and certainly isn't going to dump because she suffered head trauma. Let's put yourself in his position. What do YOU do? Do you dump your partner because she's unfair to your students? Do you lecture your partner so severely that you put your own marriage at risk to salve your student's hurt feelings? Do you turf your wife from your practice because she's not able to do her job to the professional standard that you demand, even though you may not be able to afford a better replacement and even though your wife may not be employable anywhere else? What is it that YOU DO exactly?

...

[portion only quoted, emphasis added]

I generally agree with your practical bent and I am also concerned that OP seems to have had problems elsewhere. I do think you're being a bit too understanding towards the boss/husband here though.

Since you're asking what one should do - assuming all is as OP put it and no missing side to the story etc. - the boss should apologize to mistreated employees on behalf of his wife, in addition to giving workarounds.

Also, as I think others have commented on, both as an employer and as a lawyer, the boss has some responsibilities that aren't overridden by being a spouse. Or forget that, let's say there was no relationship and the boss was just sympathetic to an employee who'd suffered a head injury and long-term or permanent consequences as a result. They would still have to consider the consequences of the person's behaviour and how to mitigate the effects on other employees or clients visiting the office.

I also wonder - in a general sense, not asking for a legal opinion - if an employer chooses to tolerate behaviour from one employee because of a family relationship or friendship, does that affect their ability to discipline or fire other employees for cause if they do the same or similar things? Like, let's say one family member who's a paid employee steals sometimes, yells at other employees and clients, is chronically late or has unexplained absences, etc. Does that mean that another employee fired for alleged cause for similar reasons would have grounds to protest that what they did wasn't so bad and they could be fired with appropriate notice, but not for cause? Or, if it's argued to be accommodation for an employee (who happens to be a family member...) with a head injury and consequences, does accommodating one such employee set the precedent as to what's reasonable to accommodate, so that the employer is effectively estopped from arguing that accommodation of other employees is unreasonable, so long as they're slightly less troublesome?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Diplock's point, I think it is helpful to keep track of what's happening on the other side because it will help you determine when you are in a "no win" situation.  It sounds like a "no win" situation to me.  A "no win" is where any action to improve the status quo or do the 'right thing' will almost definitely make things worse, the status quo is also unbearable, and extricating yourself from the status quo is not worth it.  Actually, it's so close being worth it that you can't tell, so there's a meta-"no win" there too.  Don't look that up btw, that's totally a real definition.

Everyone experiences emotional crisis at some point in their lives.  I don't mean to be defeatist about it but if you weren't an articling student you would likely experience some emotional crisis at work at some point in your life, and we can't go Isekai or John Wick as a response to it.

The answer is attending to your mental health: call the lawyer's assistance program.  It's free and you'll be talking to someone who was a lawyer before (as far as I recall).  Having access to free counselling is a huge privilege unavailable to many who are going through crises that are just as legitimate as your one.

Thankfully, this too shall pass lol sorry gandalf #balrogdidnothingwrong.  But seriously, call LAP, give the CBT and counselling work a go, get mixed results, reconsider all your life choices up to this point, get into voodoo dolls to punish your enemies, say no to drugs (I mean it), vent to those you trust, rediscover your hobbies and interests, and give the voodoo dolls a second shot.  Tragedy and comedy, name a more iconic duo.

EDIT: IIRC you legit cannot work while doing PLTC, like that's a rule somewhere, so to the extent anyone experiences an employer requesting conduct contrary to the rules, remember that feeling when the opportunity to skirt the rules presents itself in your practice (it will definitely happen) and be better.  No ... not better.  Be Best!  lol still can't believe they went with that and anti-bullying. 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Another Hutz said:

But seriously, call LAP, give the CBT and counselling work a go, get mixed results, reconsider all your life choices up to this point, get into voodoo dolls to punish your enemies, say no to drugs (I mean it), vent to those you trust, rediscover your hobbies and interests, and give the voodoo dolls a second shot. 

Aaahahaha, this is hilarious but also super helpful. Voodoo for the win.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/8/2019 at 7:38 PM, Hegdis said:

To cope with anxiety you need to be proactive and get yourself into some CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) sessions. I have done this myself.

 

CBD also works well. ;) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/10/2019 at 9:52 PM, Another Hutz said:

The answer is attending to your mental health: call the lawyer's assistance program.  It's free and you'll be talking to someone who was a lawyer before (as far as I recall).  Having access to free counselling is a huge privilege unavailable to many who are going through crises that are just as legitimate as your one.

is this service offered through phone calls or in person therapy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/9/2019 at 4:04 PM, Diplock said:

I hope to God none of my female employees become pregnant. Not because I don't recognize their right to become pregnant - just because I don't have even the first bloody clue what I'd do about it.

Uh...if you don't know what to do about it, you probably shouldn't be banging your staff.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • It’s understandable to want to map your career out and feel like you have a plan and are in control but as much as possible try not to feel like you need to do this right now. You’ll hear a lot of people who talk like they have it all figured out but they don’t and are just trying to calm themselves down by convincing others they have it figured out.  Just do your best in your classes and each day you’ll learn more about different practice areas and opportunities that may interest you. You’ll have 350 different career plans by the time you graduate and none of them will actually happen. I didn’t take a single class or participate in a single clinic in all of law school that’s relevant to what I do now. I don’t even practice Canadian law at all.  Just do your best in classes and forget the rest, at least until the end of 1L. Everybody who is convincing themselves (by trying to convince you) that they’ve put themselves on the path by joining some clinic or connecting with some professor or lawyer or whatever is wrong and you don’t need to worry about it. 
    • 1L is not a time when most people are at their best. They’re insecure and lost. That’s why it feels like high school. The friendships that I formed in law school that I still have are all from 2L and 3L, not that you can’t also form friendships in 1L.  Also, don’t feel like law school is the only place you can make friends. Get involved in something outside of law school and make friends there. It’s good to escape the law school bubble even when you do have law school friends.  It’s easy to feel like your legal career will be determined by how well you rank or fit in socially at law school but that’s true at all. It’s just a school. You’re a whole person outside of that.
    • Large firms may offer a wide range of general services. Individual lawyers in those situations will often be hyper-specialized, and know everything there is to know about one very specific section of that area. This level of expertise is a way to justify high bills - you have someone in the office who lives and breathes that particular clause.    If you want to be a 'well-rounded lawyer', you'd be more likely to be at the other end of the spectrum, where a sole practicioner in a small city might help people with a variety of legal problems, not knowing the details to the exactitude of the specialist, but being competent in several different areas, such as family/property/wills.    Family is certainly not an area that is limited - it's one of the ones you can be confident will exist in every community across the country. Now, whether there's enough work in that to sustain a practice is another question (see: general practice). I can't imagine, although have never bothered to research so could be completely up the wall on this, that there are many large firms doing OCI recruits with substantial family practices.    This seems a good time to mention, it doesn't seem clear what type of work you want to be doing. Governments and large firms hire through the On Campus Interview process, and a lot of careers officer time is spent on them, and they're certainly often a way to pay off debt quickly, but they're only one part of legal employment. Do you want to work in a glass tower in a major city? If so, that will necessarily limit your scope to that sort of employer. If you don't, OCIs could be a much smaller part of your world. 
    • Hey everyone! 1L here. I know I just started and all, but I want to understand how the career aspect of lawyering works.  I am getting a lot of anxiety in regards to knowing where I am going with law school. The debt is really hitting me and making me worry. I will try to keep this short and to the point. I apologize if these questions come across as dumb. They are likely super ignorant, I know your time is valuable and I honestly appreciate any insight you can provide.  I wanted to go to law school with the idea to help people with the law. People like regular folk. I was interested in family law (helping people with their familial relationships through the application of the law...helping people in distress, etc.) 1) I spoke to older students and they indicated opportunities in family law are limited, esp. with OCIs. Further, it became apparent that those Toronto firms/big firms that do specialize in family law don't hire too often/a lot. Is this true? 2a)  I really like Tort law, I have taken a course regarding it in my undergrad too. I always liked personal injury law. However, I remember talking about it at one of the socials and I felt like people would shutdown the conversation quick. I understand that it has a bad rep, but I am sure some clients do really need help. Is personal injury lucrative/are there opportunities? I know there are some PI firms on Bay.  2b) I read about insurance defence, is this in the scope of personal injury and tort law? Would this be considered as "corporate law"? It sounds interesting.  3) What is corporate/business law? I understand its law pertaining to corporate/business needs. But when people tell me they want to go into corporate and/or business law, what kind of law do they want to practice? Is it just that they want to be legal counsel for a corporation/business? I don't think merging businesses will bring me joy. Is there more to it?  To answer this, I reached out to some older students. They indicated that most corporate law firms are full service, where they offer legal services to a wide variety of cases. So, if a lawyer were to work/apply there, would they be expected to be well rounded in regards to the type of law they specialize in?  If I wanted to pursue a legal career with a specialization/interest in tort law, do I have a place in a corporate law firm? I hope you can see my confusion.  4) I have people telling me they want to do litigation. I know what that is, but what is that in the sense of a career? Do firms explicitly hire litigators? I thought a lawyer once called are litigators and solicitors. Are litigators people that only do litigation? And if so, do they have a certain type of law the specialize in or is it mixed (I think you can see my confusion lies somewhere with the idea of specializing)? I am assuming they need to be hired at a firm that has good amount of litigation cases.  Lastly, is it the case that a law student will find a type of law they want to practice, and apply to a firm that specializes in that type of law? Or is it more complicated than that?  I hope these are all appropriate questions. Feel free to be as blunt as possible, any advice would be great.  Thank you so much!           
    • I'm sorry you're experiencing this. I understand how sometimes it can feel like everyone has made their friends and it seems really cliquey. I too am an introvert and have difficulty making friends; I didn't have ANY friends until I was 13 and still find it hard to be in social situations. What helped was finding my "people". Don't focus on the loudest groups who have formed their clique already. Look for someone in the room who is sitting alone and sit next to this person. Say hi. Ask where they're from, what they did their undergrad in.You won't connect with every person you introduce yourself to but there's probably another person like you who is feeling just as alone.
×
×
  • Create New...