Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
artsydork

Free EDI hours (LSO Requirement)

Recommended Posts

3 EDI hours needed by 2020 whether you agree with EDI or not. Free online options available by LSO here. Up to 6 hours of archived programs can be watched alone. Have at it, counsel.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, artsydork said:

3 EDI hours needed by 2020 whether you agree with EDI or not. Free online options available by LSO here. Up to 6 hours of archived programs can be watched alone. Have at it, counsel.

These programs are free and count towards professionalism, so good. I haven't yet watched these so can't criticize them, positively or negatively though some of the titles leave me wondering how useful they will be to lawyers as lawyers becoming less discriminatory and more welcoming?

Some of the professionalism hours I've watched in the past have to do with e.g. dealing with clients with a physical or mental disability, which seemed to me both educational and important for lawyers to consider even if they don't currently have any such clients. Are these archived programs focused on e.g. how to be less discriminatory, how lawyers should and can be welcoming to diverse people (as colleagues, employees, clients, etc.), that is focused on EDI for lawyers, or are they more focused on, here's information about EDI generally? Because the former would be better, and more focused.

Also, and thinking of some (non-law) online courses I've taken, ideally there should be online testing to help make sure the viewer has actually viewed and paid attention. But that's about all webinars, not EDI specifically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, epeeist said:

These programs are free and count towards professionalism, so good. I haven't yet watched these so can't criticize them, positively or negatively though some of the titles leave me wondering how useful they will be to lawyers as lawyers becoming less discriminatory and more welcoming?

Some of the professionalism hours I've watched in the past have to do with e.g. dealing with clients with a physical or mental disability, which seemed to me both educational and important for lawyers to consider even if they don't currently have any such clients. Are these archived programs focused on e.g. how to be less discriminatory, how lawyers should and can be welcoming to diverse people (as colleagues, employees, clients, etc.), that is focused on EDI for lawyers, or are they more focused on, here's information about EDI generally? Because the former would be better, and more focused.

Also, and thinking of some (non-law) online courses I've taken, ideally there should be online testing to help make sure the viewer has actually viewed and paid attention. But that's about all webinars, not EDI specifically.

The pride 2019 speaks of issues trans*people face. Many cisgendered individuals don't know what is experienced so that is one way of understanding - by listening to stories.

 The other ones seem to be introductory to cultures and experiences of a group. That seems to be in the same vein - being welcomed into a space and hearing the stories of these people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, artsydork said:

3 EDI hours needed by 2020 whether you agree with EDI or not. Free online options available by LSO here. Up to 6 hours of archived programs can be watched alone. Have at it, counsel.

Thanks! Now I have my NYE plans all set!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, artsydork said:

The pride 2019 speaks of issues trans*people face. Many cisgendered individuals don't know what is experienced so that is one way of understanding - by listening to stories.

 The other ones seem to be introductory to cultures and experiences of a group. That seems to be in the same vein - being welcomed into a space and hearing the stories of these people.

We had something similar in my ethics class in 3L, where we learned about First Nations people. That was more focused on how you need to be aware of weird issues that crop up due to treaty rights and other things of that nature, though. 

Edited by Skweemish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Skweemish said:

We had something similar in my ethics class in 3L, where we learned about First Nations people. That was more focused on how you need to be aware of weird issues that crop up due to treaty rights and other things of that nature, though. 

See, that sounds good. And again, haven't watched these yet. But, there's a huge difference between, what should lawyers know as lawyers to serve people as lawyers, versus what should woke humans know as woke humans to relate to people. I'll see when I watch.

Like, not that I do wills, but if I did, I would want to reject a client who wanted to punish (with less or no money) one of their children for being LGBT. But, ethically, would I be permitted to do so (if not in a jurisdiction like BC that I think precludes such discriminatory bequests as has been discussed on this board)? To what extent, ethically, may a lawyer give legal advice that includes moral considerations like not being discriminatory (when that discrimination is legal), e.g. to a client that is an employer or refuse to act, withdraw services, can you still bill for wasted work or do you have to absorb the costs of what you did before you found out the client motivation (that is not illegal, just as a person you don't like it)? Etc. Those are the sort of real-world things I'd like to see addressed, just like the programs about clients with disabilities addressed some practicalities of dealing with some clients with mental illness etc. If the programs don't address practicalities, they should.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, epeeist said:

See, that sounds good. And again, haven't watched these yet. But, there's a huge difference between, what should lawyers know as lawyers to serve people as lawyers, versus what should woke humans know as woke humans to relate to people. I'll see when I watch.

Like, not that I do wills, but if I did, I would want to reject a client who wanted to punish (with less or no money) one of their children for being LGBT. But, ethically, would I be permitted to do so (if not in a jurisdiction like BC that I think precludes such discriminatory bequests as has been discussed on this board)? To what extent, ethically, may a lawyer give legal advice that includes moral considerations like not being discriminatory (when that discrimination is legal), e.g. to a client that is an employer or refuse to act, withdraw services, can you still bill for wasted work or do you have to absorb the costs of what you did before you found out the client motivation (that is not illegal, just as a person you don't like it)? Etc. Those are the sort of real-world things I'd like to see addressed, just like the programs about clients with disabilities addressed some practicalities of dealing with some clients with mental illness etc. If the programs don't address practicalities, they should.

From a very cursory review, some of them do appear to be that kind of analysis. Like, the Pride Month one specifically looks to engage with the impact of the Just Society Report and potential ramifications of these decisions and the historical context around them. So, that's a real-world application issue.

So basically it looks like the LSO is taking an opportunity to give people updates on important developments around marginalized people so you give the best advice possible. Seems good to me!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to put it out there, I think we have until the END of 2020 to get our 3 EDI hours in. Jaggers, you have at least one more NYE!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/10/2019 at 1:20 PM, artsydork said:

Just to put it out there, I think we have until the END of 2020 to get our 3 EDI hours in. Jaggers, you have at least one more NYE!

I landed here because I googled this while watching this (well-intentioned but wholly waste of time, imo, but whatever) and just knew there'd be a post like this somewhere on this site haha. Surely I'm not the only one doing this right now

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I greatly enjoyed the 2018 Louis Riel Day one.  It was literally an hour and a half of the panelists complaining about why eastern Metis people aren't real Metis.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we're all checking in on you, Jaggers. Pandemic EDI NYE or are you all set!?

 

On 9/6/2019 at 8:32 PM, Jaggers said:

Thanks! Now I have my NYE plans all set!

 

On 9/10/2019 at 1:20 PM, artsydork said:

Just to put it out there, I think we have until the END of 2020 to get our 3 EDI hours in. Jaggers, you have at least one more NYE!

 

54 minutes ago, sng said:

I landed here because I googled this while watching this (well-intentioned but wholly waste of time, imo, but whatever) and just knew there'd be a post like this somewhere on this site haha. Surely I'm not the only one doing this right now

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2019 at 12:59 PM, epeeist said:

See, that sounds good. And again, haven't watched these yet. But, there's a huge difference between, what should lawyers know as lawyers to serve people as lawyers, versus what should woke humans know as woke humans to relate to people. I'll see when I watch.

Like, not that I do wills, but if I did, I would want to reject a client who wanted to punish (with less or no money) one of their children for being LGBT. But, ethically, would I be permitted to do so (if not in a jurisdiction like BC that I think precludes such discriminatory bequests as has been discussed on this board)?

One thing BC lawyers do is help people get around the wills variation act to enable people to favour various children, write out step children, ex wives etc...

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2019 at 12:59 PM, epeeist said:

To what extent, ethically, may a lawyer give legal advice that includes moral considerations like not being discriminatory (when that discrimination is legal)

To pick an example at random, there are federal lawyers right now working on how to construct a discriminatory tax on foreigners who own land in Canada.

 

Theoretically if such a tax was struck down as breaching the charter I imagine there would be a lot of government lawyering going on to figure out how to avoid repaying people who'd had their rights breached.  You can't use the not withstanding clause to retroactively bless legislation but there is other skullduggery you can try.

 

If the BC liberals had stayed in power I'm sure government lawyers would be ordered to look for a way to force a TRU law school past the SCC case too.

Edited by kurrika

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jaggers said:

I only need 1.5 hours! I will get it this evening. 

Almost done! I found a good one in Torys archive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/30/2020 at 4:10 PM, kurrika said:

To pick an example at random, there are federal lawyers right now working on how to construct a discriminatory tax on foreigners who own land in Canada.

 

Theoretically if such a tax was struck down as breaching the charter I imagine there would be a lot of government lawyering going on to figure out how to avoid repaying people who'd had their rights breached.  You can't use the not withstanding clause to retroactively bless legislation but there is other skullduggery you can try.

 

If the BC liberals had stayed in power I'm sure government lawyers would be ordered to look for a way to force a TRU law school past the SCC case too.

I see a big difference between work for an employer (if what they want you to do is legal and not unethical, do it or quit) versus for a client (if not in a situation where can't withdraw because e.g. trial imminent) - under what circumstances can you refuse just because you don't like it, and then as I had previously asked, what about time already spent now wasted because lawyer doesn't want to do a legal, ethical thing they don't like? DOJ lawyers in US re Trump is an interesting topic but more for OT I think.

Last paragraph, I assume you mean TWU but they had changed their signed statement anyway, so not sure what you mean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/30/2020 at 2:55 PM, utmguy said:

I greatly enjoyed the 2018 Louis Riel Day one.  It was literally an hour and a half of the panelists complaining about why eastern Metis people aren't real Metis.  

I already had enough EDI, but needed professionalism so watched Hispanic Day videos.

There was some useful info/q&a for people who practice in the area of immigration law. Or in one of them, for someone looking to become a judge or justice. But there was much more, complaining about Trump and the US, disagreeing with Canadian law, etc. I mean, I disagree with Canadian restrictions on claiming refugee status etc., but that's an argument about policy or morality or rights, there wasn't discussion about how e.g. there were Charter violations or anything like that. So it was mostly, immigration /refugee system is bad. Which I agree it is, but this goes back to my prior comment, it doesn't really seem to be about lawyers and the practice of law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, epeeist said:

 

Last paragraph, I assume you mean TWU but they had changed their signed statement anyway, so not sure what you mean?

I meant TWU yes.   And I also meant the election back in 2017, pre-changing the statement, likely looking at ways to force the law society in BC to accredit.

Edited by kurrika

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...