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2L Summer (2020) Toronto Recruit PFOs/ITCs

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9 hours ago, Deadpool said:

And how do you know this? I've seen students from a wide range of Canadian law schools land OCI jobs at big firms over the years, so where are you getting this from? I can't think of a single law firm in Canada that does OCIs at only 2-4 schools. 

There are definitely a few that don't hold OCIs in Ottawa and at least one said they were only accepting Osgoode and UofT applications. Students from other schools would go straight to in-firms, I'm assuming.

I'm just curious about the exact number. Ottawa, for example, has 36 possible OCIs. 

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11 minutes ago, anonymousanon said:

Did anyone from Oz get OCIs with Norton or BLG?

Just want to know if my list is updated? 

The list was posted last night. Those firms included.

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On 9/15/2019 at 1:43 AM, Deadpool said:

And how do you know this? I've seen students from a wide range of Canadian law schools land OCI jobs at big firms over the years, so where are you getting this from? I can't think of a single law firm in Canada that does OCIs at only 2-4 schools. 

My firm only does the 4 for OCIs. It happens. Not sure how many don’t do all the schools, but it’s at least a handful. 

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20 minutes ago, Ryn said:

My firm only does the 4 for OCIs. It happens. Not sure how many don’t do all the schools, but it’s at least a handful. 

Thanks for the clarification. This is shocking news to me, since I assumed almost all firms - at least in the Toronto OCIs - did OCIs at every Ontario law school, except for Lakehead. 

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1 hour ago, harveyspecter993 said:

The list was posted last night. Those firms included.

I think I was just in denial about those ones in particular, but thank you!  

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Just now, anonymousanon said:

I think I was just in denial about those ones in particular, but thank you!  

FWIW no one I've spoken to is totally happy with their list.

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On 9/15/2019 at 1:43 AM, Deadpool said:

And how do you know this? I've seen students from a wide range of Canadian law schools land OCI jobs at big firms over the years, so where are you getting this from? I can't think of a single law firm in Canada that does OCIs at only 2-4 schools. 

My firm (boutique, around 30 lawyers) only does OCIs for Osgoode and UofT but accepts applications from all schools. If you’re at one of the non-OCI schools your first interview is the in-firm. It’s a matter of resources - doing OCIs is a massive time commitment for the lawyers that go and adding out of town travel to that often isn’t worthwhile for firms my size.

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5 minutes ago, Blurg said:

My firm (boutique, around 30 lawyers) only does OCIs for Osgoode and UofT but accepts applications from all schools. If you’re at one of the non-OCI schools your first interview is the in-firm. It’s a matter of resources - doing OCIs is a massive time commitment for the lawyers that go and adding out of town travel to that often isn’t worthwhile for firms my size.

I don't know if you're in a position to answer this, and this question can be answered by anyone who has knowledge of the process, but is there a typical timeline that firms contact students from non-OCI schools about in-firms? Is it usually after the OCIs wrap up and are the in-firms scheduled for the same week as OCI firms?

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PFO Blakes, ITC Goodmans (Windsor)

Edited by talos
Clarity

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Is it true that grades are really important for getting through the initial door but from the OCI onward all that matters is how well the conversations go? So effectively an A student and a B+/B student start off fresh with the same chance of an offer?

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4 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it true that grades are really important for getting through the initial door but from the OCI onward all that matters is how well the conversations go? So effectively an A student and a B+/B student start off fresh with the same chance of an offer?

No one I know actually involved with this process has said that. Grades still play a role. But that role diminishes the further you go.

That's what I've been told anyway. Others on here can confirm/deny.

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10 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

No one I know actually involved with this process has said that. Grades still play a role. But that role diminishes the further you go.

That's what I've been told anyway. Others on here can confirm/deny.

So how much does an A average help?

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26 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

So how much does an A average help?

I really don't think it helps much. When I did OCIs at Oz, many of the B/B+ and even the rare C+ students (connections, nepotism, varsity athletes, etc.) were hired over the A students. The grades can get you the interview, but you have 17 minutes to sell yourself in an interview and make the people sitting across from you like you. Your grades are not what is going to make them like you, but rather how you converse with them and your personality. 

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1 minute ago, Simbaa said:

I really don't think it helps much. When I did OCIs at Oz, many of the B/B+ and even the rare C+ students (connections, nepotism, varsity athletes, etc.) were hired over the A students. The grades can get you the interview, but you have 17 minutes to sell yourself in an interview and make the people sitting across from you like you. Your grades are not what is going to make them like you, but rather how you converse with them and your personality. 

Which firms did this happen at. Was this at sisters or other national firms?

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47 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it true that grades are really important for getting through the initial door but from the OCI onward all that matters is how well the conversations go? So effectively an A student and a B+/B student start off fresh with the same chance of an offer?

No. Grades matter quite a bit and someone with an A average will generally have a leg up on someone with a B average. Obviously the interviews themselves help the lawyers make a decision around whether someone will be a good fit. Sometimes it happens that the A student is a lump of coal and the B student is the better candidate notwithstanding his or her grades.

If I had to estimate, I would say that grades are maybe as much as half of what matters in a candidate. The balance will be experience, personality, ambitions, and other soft factors like that. The lower your grades, the more you have to compensate on these other factors. Though at some point you won't be getting interviews at all if your grades are too low.

I say the above with the caveat that I have very limited experience in the hiring process from the firm's side, but this is what I can generally say has been the case with my firm and a few others I know about.

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1 hour ago, harveyspecter993 said:

So how much does an A average help?

An A average on a dud candidate that doesn’t fit with the firm isn’t getting hired over the B average student with an infectious personality whom everyone loves. 

An A average will assist with tied applicants between that particular student and a B+ student or anyone below that. It’s fairly intuitive.

No one will or can provide advice as to exactly how much emphasis is being placed on what at each firm. It’s a contextual decision based on the students grades, personality, and how that meshes with the particular firm.

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10 hours ago, chaboywb said:

I don't know if you're in a position to answer this, and this question can be answered by anyone who has knowledge of the process, but is there a typical timeline that firms contact students from non-OCI schools about in-firms? Is it usually after the OCIs wrap up and are the in-firms scheduled for the same week as OCI firms?

In firms are offered to all students (OCI school or not) at the same time on call day and take place during the proscribed interview week. And because I’m sure someone is wondering, those who did OCIs don’t have any kind of leg up over those that are interviewed for the first time in firm - once you’re in the door for the in firm you’re on the same footing. You just got there by different routes.

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