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wtamow

2L Summer (2020) Toronto Recruit PFOs/ITCs

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4 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

Did they hold OCIs at any schools?

 They did at UofT but interviewed like 10 students I think  (in context, the largest firms interviewed 60 and boutiques were either 20 or 40 usually) 

Edited by Newfoundland

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10 minutes ago, wtamow said:

Yes, at my school.

Okay thanks, I thought they might be in-firm only. I haven't heard anything.

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If I am 1 of the 10 they interviewed, should I email them? I would really like the know if I should leave room in my schedule for them. 

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17 hours ago, kakoke said:

Did Torkins ITCs go out to all schools?

I received an Itc from them

Edited by pattie12
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12 minutes ago, Hagen8899 said:

Has anybody from Oz received an ITC or PFO from BLG?

They reached out on Tuesday I think

Edited by harveyspecter993
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1 hour ago, Newfoundland said:

If we havent had an ITC so far from firms that have already sent ITCs, should we still expect any movement or like a final wave on the last day? Did this happen last year a final wave before call day? 

I have friends who are declining ITCs today for a few firms so they might send out more ITCs or just wait until call day tomorrow. 

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I haven’t received PFOs or ITCs from most places but they also didn’t do OCIs at my school. Does that mean anything? 

Edited by Lawstudent7890

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One thing of note from people I know is that if your school didn't have OCI's from a firm you are interested in they may not send ITC emails and just contact you on call day. So have hope people!

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6 minutes ago, Newfoundland said:

did Thorsteinssons send PFO or ITCs to anyone?  Asking for a few at UofT

Oz got ITC's from them earlier this week 

Edited by JonSnow95
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has anyone from uottawa heard from gowling or beard winter?

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