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vanhopeful95

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On 8/29/2019 at 10:19 AM, feraenaturae said:

Do profs at your school set minimum summary lengths, or are you just stating a personal preference as an absolute requirement for success? 

Based on the many summaries that I've seen over the years and the corresponding grades they were used to produce, I would strongly advise against summaries this long, unless the long summary was in addition to a much shorter summary.

With respect to the broader question, no one can tell you which method is best.  As outlined above, there are advantages to both.  No one can tell you which will work better for you.  I am of the opinion that the strongest students would be strong students regardless of which method they used.

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On 8/28/2019 at 10:24 AM, harveyspecter993 said:

It's going to be a pain to transcribe those notes when you're building your summaries.

Transcribing the handwritten notes helps you remember the content better, in my experience.

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1 minute ago, kurrika said:

Transcribing the handwritten notes helps you remember the content better, in my experience.

That may be true bit it's still a pain. But if it works for you the by all means.

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7 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

That may be true bit it's still a pain. But if it works for you the by all means.

And, for most, I would imagine, it is a huge waste of time where you could be doing other things. Presumably, you will be going through your notes to prepare an outline/summary for exams. If you don't know the material by then, well, that's a problem. 

I agree with ProfReader that no one can know what will work best for someone else. If you're intent on handwriting notes, start off with that and see how it goes. Nothing to say you can't change if you find it isn't working. I also agree that it's likely that good students will be successful with either method.

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5 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

And, for most, I would imagine, it is a huge waste of time where you could be doing other things.

Maybe I studied for exams weird.  I found re-typing notes while building a CAN to help cement everything in my brain a lot better than when I just copy pasted or deleted typed notes.   Because I was forced to work with the material instead of just skimming or reading it.

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On 8/30/2019 at 1:34 PM, kurrika said:

Maybe I studied for exams weird.  I found re-typing notes while building a CAN to help cement everything in my brain a lot better than when I just copy pasted or deleted typed notes.   Because I was forced to work with the material instead of just skimming or reading it.

I found the same thing.  The other benefit I found with handwriting lecture notes was having to process and shorten, to keep pace with the lecturer.  Many of my classmates essentially transcribed the lecture, so there wasn't much in-class synthesis.

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Generally speaking, are students permitted to make audio recordings of lectures for personal use?

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11 minutes ago, Pete said:

Generally speaking, are students permitted to make audio recordings of lectures for personal use?

It depends on the school and professor.  I've never had anyone without a disability do it.  I would probably say no to someone who didn't.  Also, there's no point.  No one has time to re-listen to the lectures.

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9 hours ago, Pete said:

Generally speaking, are students permitted to make audio recordings of lectures for personal use?

At Osgoode the profs either have to or are strongly encouraged to record all of their lectures and post the audio. Accessibility!

The upshot of that is that you can skip every class and then just listen to all the lectures for two straight sleepless days immediately before the exam. Condense your four month semester down to a couple of miserable weeks. Law school pro tips.

 

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33 minutes ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

The upshot of that is that you can skip every class and then just listen to all the lectures for two straight sleepless days immediately before the exam. Condense your four month semester down to a couple of miserable weeks. Law school pro tips.

 

This is a terrible idea.

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1 hour ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

At Osgoode the profs either have to or are strongly encouraged to record all of their lectures and post the audio. Accessibility!

The upshot of that is that you can skip every class and then just listen to all the lectures for two straight sleepless days immediately before the exam. Condense your four month semester down to a couple of miserable weeks. Law school pro tips.

 

Great way to end up with a C+ average.

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2 hours ago, ProfReader said:

This is a terrible idea.

It was a joke, no?

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1 hour ago, Pete said:

 

It was a joke, no?

I don't know.  But some of the 0Ls and 1Ls around here seem very impressionable so it seemed wise to clarify.

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I had unusual study habits, at least, so I was told.  I never studied the day before an exam.....ever.  I kept up all semester and studied when exam time approached until I was comfortable that I "had it".   The day before the exam I'd just skim for about 20 minutes....tops.  Spent the day doing anything but law.   People thought I was nuts but it worked for me.  And I surfed that bell curve all the way to graduation.  :) 

Edited by Captain Courageous

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I'm a teacher currently (seriously thinking of applying to law next year, so following discussions here). There is some compelling research, for what it's worth, that tends to show that handwritten notes are best for understanding and retention of class material. While I have not yet experienced the rigours of 1L, it seems to me that from that point of view the idea of taking notes by hand during class and they summarizing them later, using a computer, would be a very effective learning strategy for many people. 

Just my two cents. 

Here is a link to the key article on the subject. I don't know how long it will stay active. I found it compelling reading, but the abstract is clear enough on its own.

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I don't mean to dredge this thread up, but I needed to throw my 2 cents out there.

I took all my notes by hand through 3 years of law school and also hand wrote all of my exams. I couldn't imagine typing exams. I always felt that when I was writing out my answers, I could remember writing down information on the same topic weeks or months before and things sometimes came to me that I hadn't thought of in ages. 

I also took my written notes and tabbed them out instead of really studying them the day before the exam. I'd use found a set of CANs and work my own material into them (usually over the course of a couple days) and printed them off as a fall back plan to use during the exam, but I usually just relied on my tabbed handwritten notes. 

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Just wanted to chime back in on this topic now that I'm done my first semester of 1L. I ended up using OneNote and have 0 regrets. I am very confident that I would've missed key information by hand-writing my notes and the speed at which you can type better insulates you from that. Furthermore, it was nice to be able to copy and paste in info from prof's class overviews, their class objectives etc. Now that I've had my first set of exams, it was also 100x easier to create my outlines having info I can simply copy and paste over. Having handwritten all my notes in undergrad, I am still very happy with the choice to type note. Hope this is helpful to some upcoming 1L next year! 

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30 minutes ago, vanhopeful95 said:

Just wanted to chime back in on this topic now that I'm done my first semester of 1L. I ended up using OneNote and have 0 regrets. I am very confident that I would've missed key information by hand-writing my notes and the speed at which you can type better insulates you from that. Furthermore, it was nice to be able to copy and paste in info from prof's class overviews, their class objectives etc. Now that I've had my first set of exams, it was also 100x easier to create my outlines having info I can simply copy and paste over. Having handwritten all my notes in undergrad, I am still very happy with the choice to type note. Hope this is helpful to some upcoming 1L next year! 

I would hold off until you get those grades back. 

My opinion: if you are transcribing a lecture word-for-word, or noting so much that typing speed becomes an issue, you are doing something seriously wrong. 

But, to each their own. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by QuincyWagstaff
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https://www.livescribe.com/site/

I used one of these during my undergrad. I really liked being able to listen to the chunk of lecture recorded when I was writing my notes if I didn’t recall the detail I wanted. 
Anyone else use livescribe?

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