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Macbook vs Windows laptop for Law School

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Between a Macbook Air/Pro or Windows, which one do most people recommend for law school? I have heard different things about certain software's for tests, exams etc. not working so great on Macbook's so wanted to see if anyone has information/thoughts/opinions on this. 

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The majority of law students use Macs and have for years. If the exam software (which is the only software you really need for law school) didn’t work well people would stop using them pretty quickly.

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Get a Windows laptop. Why? It's significantly cheaper for better value (better specs for a much cheaper price). The exam software will not crash on you. More applications support Windows than a Mac.

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Ill be getting a surface laptop or a surface pro 6. Been using my surface pro since the start of undergrad and really like it. Just deciding on if I want the laptop frame or not. 

Plus I cant really deal with various apple decisions like going with the touchbar vs touchscreen, quality issues, the keyboard, ios being so closed off etc. 

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16 hours ago, georgecostanzajr said:

Get a Windows laptop. Why? It's significantly cheaper for better value (better specs for a much cheaper price). The exam software will not crash on you. More applications support Windows than a Mac.

Any laptop in particular you'd recommend?  

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12 hours ago, yeezy said:

Ill be getting a surface laptop or a surface pro 6. Been using my surface pro since the start of undergrad and really like it. Just deciding on if I want the laptop frame or not. 

Plus I cant really deal with various apple decisions like going with the touchbar vs touchscreen, quality issues, the keyboard, ios being so closed off etc. 

Thanks! I haven't heard much about surface laptops but I'll look into them. I had a Asus during my undergrad but found it to be slow and battery life became weak after 1.5 years so hoping to find a laptop that will work at its best for the 3 years at least

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22 hours ago, wakawaka said:

The majority of law students use Macs and have for years. If the exam software (which is the only software you really need for law school) didn’t work well people would stop using them pretty quickly.

That's true. Thanks for clarifying !

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Get Windows, because that's what you'll most likely be using in practice after graduation. You can also get a Mac if you dual boot.  

The specs of the computer should be good enough that the exam-writing software does not lag. Some exam-writing software can be taxing on your computer for some reason and may crash it.

Your priority should be a comfortable and a high-quality keyboard on the laptop. You will be typing a lot and it helps to be able to type fast in exams. Mac keyboards are generally very good. It's harder to find a Windows laptop that has a high quality keyboard. 

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Posted (edited)

To qualify the above, MacBook keyboards are good, however there have been a lot of complaints about the new keyboard design. I definitely prefer the keyboard of my 2015 MacBook pro in comparison to the new design. 

Edited by AJD19
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23 minutes ago, AJD19 said:

To qualify the above, MacBook keyboards are good, however there have been a lot of complaints about the new keyboard design. I definitely prefer the keyboard of my 2015 MacBook pro in comparison to the new design. 

Yes, the new keyboard design is awful. I am never getting a MacBook again until they change that.

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2 hours ago, guy102931 said:

I's harder to find a Windows laptop that has a high quality keyboard. 

I'd say most of the flagship windows laptops are considered to have a better keyboard then the MacBook at this point, all microsoft surfaces , lenovo x1, dell xps 13, huawei matebook, etc. 

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One hugely underrated benefit of a Mac if you spend a lot of time on campus, you can borrow a charger from a lot of the people around you, or the library.

You can pry my MBP from my cold, dead hands, but I'm also one of the monsters that actually really likes the newer keyboard, so do with this information what you will.

2 hours ago, guy102931 said:

Get Windows, because that's what you'll most likely be using in practice after graduation. You can also get a Mac if you dual boot.  

I mean, unless you have very specific use cases like developing, don't do this. The newer Macbooks have a software undervolt that isn't present in Windows (at least the 2018s, the "fix" for the overheating when they released) and makes everything run toasty, and the amazing trackpad is gone with the Bootcamp drivers.

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2 hours ago, goalie said:

I thought this thread had some good content:

 

Thanks!! This thread was actually really helpful 

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On 8/18/2019 at 5:52 PM, dq20 said:

Any laptop in particular you'd recommend?  

I would look out for a good deal first and foremost on a laptop. I found a deal for an Asus Vivobook S with an Intel i7 8th gen processor and a built-in SSD drive for $928 at Walmart and ordered it immediately. It's a sleek laptop - has all of the ports you need and is super lightweight and small (similar to a Macbook in that respect). From a brief search I didn't find the same deal, only an i5 for that price.

Also depends on what you need it for. I'm a huge techie. Even though I don't do gaming on my laptop or machine learning, I still wanted something powerful that would last for years. If note-taking, email, exam-taking, skype, Youtube/Netflix, etc. is all you need it for, an i5 chip will deliver that performance. You don't need the "best" laptop out there.

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8 hours ago, wtamow said:

Yes, the new keyboard design is awful. I am never getting a MacBook again until they change that.

Yes, the keyboard has given me a lot of grief. Mine is on recall but I haven't yet managed to have it changed out. Most days I use an external monitor and keyboard otherwise I wouldn't have coped with the constant skipping/missing keystrokes.

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Lol this topic has been beaten to a pulp across this platform...

heres the gist of what people tend to argue:

PC’s are cheaper... not really true. You need (or should be getting) a SSD and those are going to run you $800 plus, so you’re gonna pay a bit more for a MacBook Air than a basic SSD CPU but not much... 

You’ll use PC’s in practice... to which someone inevitably (and intelligently) points out: lots of firms use PC and lots use Mac, there’s no way to know what you’ll use so don’t buy a laptop based off this.

heres my take on it:

Mac’s are simple, they work out of the box, they rarely get viruses and they look really nice. You can’t really customize them much. The do what they do really well and they don’t do what they don’t do. Plain and simple.

PC’s do a lot more but if you aren’t computer literate they can be a real pain to set up and get running. They’re more prone to viruses but if you want more freedom and customizability they’re the clear choice. 

 

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2 hours ago, Johnappleseed said:

PC’s are cheaper... not really true.

Don't know if youve seen the price of a MacBook Air recently, starting price is $1449. $300-600 more than a comparable PC. MacBook pro starting price is $1699. $400-$600 more than a comparable PC (surface laptop 2 is $1249 - also was just on sale for $999). And yes, in most cases, that is with an SSD.

2 hours ago, Johnappleseed said:

SSD and those are going to run you $800 plus, so you’re gonna pay a bit more for a MacBook Air than a basic SSD CPU but not much... 

I don't what a basic SSD CPU is but SSD prices have fallen drastically in recent years. You can get 256gb SSDs for around $50-80. Tho most PC manufacturers will charge you $100 to $200 for the upgrade from 128gb to 256gb. Apple charges $250. 

 

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I used a $150 chromebook for all of 1L, save the exams when I needed to borrow a computer from IT or bring my trusty (not so trusty) 2008 MBP.  For this year I upgraded to a $400 Asus vivobook so that I can use my own laptop for exams.  Seriously, you don't need something super fancy. If you want that though, for sure get it. 

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16 hours ago, yeezy said:

Don't know if youve seen the price of a MacBook Air recently, starting price is $1449. $300-600 more than a comparable PC. MacBook pro starting price is $1699. $400-$600 more than a comparable PC (surface laptop 2 is $1249 - also was just on sale for $999). And yes, in most cases, that is with an SSD.

 

I didn’t say they were the same price I said they were close. Apples back to school sale will get you $200 off the price of the laptop plus a $399 pair of beats headphones for free so it’s a good deal. Again, on a Mac you’re paying for something that looks nice and is extremely simple to use. On a PC you pay less for something you’ve got to set up yourself. But with that comes the freedom to customize and make things how you want them. My point was that neither is better, they’re just both good for different things. Of course PC lovers will adamantly tell you how terrible Mac is and Mac lovers will do the same about PC. At the end of the day it just depends what you want out of a laptop.

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