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Naysauce

Should I apply as a regular or mature student

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Hi everyone,

I'm getting ready for law school applications and I'm wondering if anybody has any advice on if I should apply as a regular or mature student. I received my B.A. (Hons) in 2013 and I've been working in the legal field as a clerk for the past 5 years. Throughout those 5 years I have progressed via promotions, etc. in my field. My stats are as follows:

cGPA: 3.36 / L2/B2: 3.53 / LSAT: scheduled for this November / ECs: average at best / Work experience: relevant, although I realize it's not a strong factor at all / Age: under 30 / Note: I plan to apply broadly across the country with a focus in Ontario and Eastern Canada where my family is located.

As mentioned above, I will qualify as a mature student but I understand that this category is still considered quite competitive and, judging by a number of other posts, most accepted mature students have accomplished work/volunteer backgrounds. 

Should I apply as a regular student? Unfortunately since applications are due Nov. 1 and I don't write the LSAT until late November, I think I'll have to choose which to apply as before I write the test. My GPA is extremely borderline but it's not yet "written-off", so to speak, as long as I score a great LSAT. Will law schools look unfavourably at the fact that an individual applying as a "regular" student has been out of school for 5+ years and thus should instead have applied as a mature student? Maybe I'm overthinking it. I'm confident that I can obtain an academic reference if I apply as a regular, but it would be much easier to obtain glowing non-academic ones if I apply as a mature student because of bosses in my field, etc.

Lastly, is it possible to apply to some schools as a regular student and others as a mature student in the same admission cycle?

Thanks everyone - I'm new to this, so any advice is greatly appreciated! 

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I also am concerned about Mature Student status.

I know for UofM they state a student is considered in this category if they are +26 years old. I am 28, but I have been consistently in university completing an undergraduate and graduate program.

Would I be required to apply to all schools as a mature student just because I am "old", or would I be able to choose to apply as a regular applicant?

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3 hours ago, Naysauce said:

Hi everyone,

I'm getting ready for law school applications and I'm wondering if anybody has any advice on if I should apply as a regular or mature student. I received my B.A. (Hons) in 2013 and I've been working in the legal field as a clerk for the past 5 years. Throughout those 5 years I have progressed via promotions, etc. in my field. My stats are as follows:

cGPA: 3.36 / L2/B2: 3.53 / LSAT: scheduled for this November / ECs: average at best / Work experience: relevant, although I realize it's not a strong factor at all / Age: under 30 / Note: I plan to apply broadly across the country with a focus in Ontario and Eastern Canada where my family is located.

As mentioned above, I will qualify as a mature student but I understand that this category is still considered quite competitive and, judging by a number of other posts, most accepted mature students have accomplished work/volunteer backgrounds. 

Should I apply as a regular student? Unfortunately since applications are due Nov. 1 and I don't write the LSAT until late November, I think I'll have to choose which to apply as before I write the test. My GPA is extremely borderline but it's not yet "written-off", so to speak, as long as I score a great LSAT. Will law schools look unfavourably at the fact that an individual applying as a "regular" student has been out of school for 5+ years and thus should instead have applied as a mature student? Maybe I'm overthinking it. I'm confident that I can obtain an academic reference if I apply as a regular, but it would be much easier to obtain glowing non-academic ones if I apply as a mature student because of bosses in my field, etc.

Lastly, is it possible to apply to some schools as a regular student and others as a mature student in the same admission cycle?

Thanks everyone - I'm new to this, so any advice is greatly appreciated! 

  Apply as  Mature. All your concerns are unfounded.

Concentrate on LSAT.

 

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24 minutes ago, Astrowelkyn said:

I know for UofM they state a student is considered in this category if they are +26 years old. I am 28, but I have been consistently in university completing an undergraduate and graduate program.

Would I be required to apply to all schools as a mature student just because I am "old", or would I be able to choose to apply as a regular applicant?

UofM says any student over 26 is a mature student. You are 28. Therefore, you a mature student based on the definition of a mature student at UofM. Just because you are a mature student at UofM does not mean you will fit the definition of a mature student elsewhere.You are not “required” to apply as a mature student. A mature student gives you an advantage for admission, why would you be required to self identify for something that would give you an advantage?

I have a feeling you are going to have a rough time with legislative interpretation in  your near future.(being cheeky, don’t take this seriously)

3 hours ago, Naysauce said:

As mentioned above, I will qualify as a mature student but I understand that this category is still considered quite competitive and, judging by a number of other posts, most accepted mature students have accomplished work/volunteer backgrounds. 

Should I apply as a regular student? Will law schools look unfavourably at the fact that an individual applying as a "regular" student has been out of school for 5+ years and thus should instead have applied as a mature student? 

I think law schools will wonder why the heck you didn’t just apply as a mature student. It’s an advantage. You’re overthinking it. Apply as a mature student.

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55 minutes ago, Astrowelkyn said:

I also am concerned about Mature Student status.

I know for UofM they state a student is considered in this category if they are +26 years old. I am 28, but I have been consistently in university completing an undergraduate and graduate program.

Would I be required to apply to all schools as a mature student just because I am "old", or would I be able to choose to apply as a regular applicant?

Some schools required certain years of full time employment for mature applicants.

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I had a similar question and I spoke to Rose at Dalhousie about mature student status. She stated that it gives you ‘two’ passes through admissions. You get reviewed as a ‘regular applicant’, which is L2 and LSAT 60/40 and if not successful they will look at you again as a ‘mature applicant’. It can only help you at Dal. 

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4 hours ago, Orches said:

UofM says any student over 26 is a mature student. You are 28. Therefore, you a mature student based on the definition of a mature student at UofM. Just because you are a mature student at UofM does not mean you will fit the definition of a mature student elsewhere.You are not “required” to apply as a mature student. A mature student gives you an advantage for admission, why would you be required to self identify for something that would give you an advantage?

I have a feeling you are going to have a rough time with legislative interpretation in  your near future.(being cheeky, don’t take this seriously)

I think law schools will wonder why the heck you didn’t just apply as a mature student. It’s an advantage. You’re overthinking it. Apply as a mature student.

Thank you for the information. I figured at the UofM I would be in the mature category, but I didn't realize other universities had more variable qualifications, or that it was considered advantageous.

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