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How does Dalhousie calculate GPA when credits are not translated as half/full?

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Hey guys. I was reading some other forums but don't really think I grasp how Dalhousie calculates "10 credits." Many students are using the term full and half courses when they explain it. My university doesn't use the half/full credit system, so how would this translate for schools that take courses that are 3 or 4 credits, for example?

In another forum and someone stated the last 10 full classes totals to 20 courses. Is this correct? If this is the case, my last 2 years were 18 courses totaling up to 65 credits and I don't mind them taking more from my third year, but I rather it not as it was a 3.7/4.33 GPA semester. The 2 years/18 classes/65 credits secures me at 3.84/4.33. I rather it not drop me. PS. the reason why I took less courses is because the honours portion of my degree had less classes worth more credits. For example: the last course I took which is a full semester was 9 credits (we also are not allowed to take any other courses when enter the 2nd semester of our honours degree).

Thanks if advance for anyone who replies. I will be contacting the school Monday, but just wanted a clearer sense of what I should expect/ask. I will, of course, comment with the information I receive from the school if there is a lack of consensus.

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When they say the last two years (10 credits), each 3 credit course is considered 0.5 credits. In Nova Scotia, all courses, to my knowledge, are 3 credits (one semester) or 6 credits (full year). So for most, this would be their final two years of study if they followed the traditional pattern of a full course load and completing undergrad in 4 years, which I know isn't as common these days (years 3 and 4 of undergrad). I had some masters courses used which accounted for 4 credits for me (8 three-credit courses) then the remaining were taken from undergrad. Myself, and many others asked Rose about this last year so I'd be surprised if the answer was anything different. Many forums have discussed whether Masters courses are treated differently but Rose told me directly they just count back your last 10 "credits" regardless of level of study. I agree with you how they use the term credits in this sense is confusing. 

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Thanks for the reply. I called them today and they told me that each class is worth .5. So, 10 credits would amount to 20 courses. But, for me, I chose to take more intensive classes that amounted to more credits. For example, I took 19 classes, amounting to 66 credits (including my honours courses which I will further explain in the body below). Do you think they will allow it as 9.5 credits?

For the 2nd semester of my honours degree, the class was worth 9 credits. From the information you provided, does this mean the class was worth 1.5 credits?

I forgot to ask them. Thanks for the response :)

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Yes the baseline 10 credits equals 20 courses was what I was referring to and what they also told me as well but for many, like yourself, it doesn't work out that smoothly since many don't follow the exact full course load for years 3 and 4 of undergrad. I would be quite confident in saying that your 9 credit course will be counted as 1.5 credits toward the 10 and if I remember correctly they told me they will be flexible on the 10 credits so if 9.5 works out smoother, they will be willing to use that instead, rather than going back another year and selecting a random course from the previous year. I think mine was roughly 9 or 9.5 as well and they said they'd likely use this rather than going back to my 3rd year of undergrad since I finished undegrad part-time then did masters level courses. 

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Thanks so much, I'll call them to confirm. From what they told me last, and I quote "we will calculate your GPA in a way that will best advantage you." Regardless if they don't take my 9 credit class as 1.5 courses, I am more than happy that they will consider 9-9.5 credits rather than strictly 10.

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