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Niki1212

Can I share my personal blog here?

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I am starting law school at Osgoode Hall in September. I have created a personal blog where I have shared posts about my experience with the LSAT, the law school application process. I will be sharing more posts about my experience at Osgoode as school starts. I was wondering if I can share the link with the students on this forum? would his be in any way an infringement of the forums' rules?

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We generally don’t allow advertisements for products or services here. And once you are connected with your blog we will not delete any posts you make here. So I would suggest putting it in your profile, but not linking it in a thread as a happy medium. 

This thread should be enough of a “promotion” for lack of a better word; people can visit your profile and follow your link if they are interested. 

 

Just please don’t come back ten months from now to request a mass deletion. This sort of thing has happened before :)

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I personally wouldn’t want my reputation tied to all the moronic thoughts I had in 1L, and am therefore glad I didn’t blog them. But I guess it’s possible you’re less of a moron than I. And, in any case, to each their own. 

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