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ask7o7

UK LLB and Canadian LLM?

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20 minutes ago, Ryn said:

A bit late with the reply here but I thought I’d mention that it doesn’t cost $200k to do both an undergrad and law school in Canada, assuming you choose your schools wisely. The undergrad I did in Ontario cost about $7k a year. For four years that’s about the cost of a single year of law school at Osgoode or U of T. But there are law schools cheaper than those that are well-regraded and will give you a quality education. 

I can’t imagine a situation where going to the UK will be cheaper than staying in Canada. I mean, if you borrow every cent, and even if you go to an expensive law school, I doubt you’d be spending much more than $100k on tuition fees for 7 years of education. If you make wise choices you can probably get away with less than that. 

Totally.

My JD was about 30K. 

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Cheapest JD today in Ontario costs 60k.

Undergrad costs just over 24 grand or so at a minimum.

Cheapest JD in English Canada costs around 30 grand.

If money is a factor, get a JD outside of ontario, unless you're looking to do american (or other countries) corporate law. 

That's my opinion. But many would agree with me. I don't think there's anything inherent to Ontario that makes a general law degree from there worth double (or more) than a non ontario law degree.

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1 minute ago, pzabbythesecond said:

I don't think there's anything inherent to Ontario that makes a general law degree from there worth double (or more) than a non ontario law degree.

Oh I for sure agree with you. If you're really cost-conscious, go to another province and you'll still get a quality legal education.

But my point was that even if you decide to stay in Ontario, I can't imagine someone spending much more than $100k on an undergrad and a JD combined. OP's $200k figure just seemed ridiculously inflated.

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3 minutes ago, Ryn said:

Oh I for sure agree with you. If you're really cost-conscious, go to another province and you'll still get a quality legal education.

But my point was that even if you decide to stay in Ontario, I can't imagine someone spending much more than $100k on an undergrad and a JD combined. OP's $200k figure just seemed ridiculously inflated.

well, purely tuition sure. 

Factoring in an additional 3 years of living costs incurred on debt, not even counting opportunity cost, it's not so far off the 200k mark.

Of course, I believe the UK system for licensing as an actual lawyer takes longer than 3 years out of high school.

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52 minutes ago, Ryn said:

A bit late with the reply here but I thought I’d mention that it doesn’t cost $200k to do both an undergrad and law school in Canada, assuming you choose your schools wisely. The undergrad I did in Ontario cost about $7k a year. For four years that’s about the cost of a single year of law school at Osgoode or U of T. But there are law schools cheaper than those that are well-regraded and will give you a quality education. 

I can’t imagine a situation where going to the UK will be cheaper than staying in Canada. I mean, if you borrow every cent, and even if you go to an expensive law school, I doubt you’d be spending much more than $100k on tuition fees for 7 years of education. If you make wise choices you can probably get away with less than that. 

Putting law school outside of Canada out of the question, I'm not exactly certain on how the status of a law school impacts your employability in the future. My absolute, cheapest (and likely the easiest) option is to stay in Calgary (where I'm from) and complete an undergraduate degree, then complete a JD at U of Calgary. Tuition for this route is 100k. However, and this is where I'm hesitant and such a cost arises, I'm told that going to U of C only makes sense for an undergraduate degree, and that it isn't worth going to for law school. Any other university I want to go to (solely for law school, an undergraduate degree will likely be based solely on cost) then carries the costs of staying, really, "out of city". If I go three hours up to U of Alberta, it's 20k per year for law school. UBC? Appears to be 30k. U of Toronto? 48k. 

Should I be concerned about the reputation of law schools in Canada when applying? 

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6 minutes ago, ask7o7 said:

I'm told that going to U of C only makes sense for an undergraduate degree, and that it isn't worth going to for law school.

Whoever told you this has no idea what they are talking about.

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15 minutes ago, ask7o7 said:

Should I be concerned about the reputation of law schools in Canada when applying? 

I think you should firstly try and figure out where you want to stay and practice. Do you want to stay in Alberta? Or are you shooting for Toronto Bay Street biglaw? If the answer is the latter, maybe you want to consider an Ontario school, but even so it's not necessary. Plenty of people get hired for Bay Street who aren't from Toronto. And even if you don't, you can lateral there if you spend a few years working at a similar level in Calgary, for example. The only extra hoop you'd have to jump through is getting licensed in a different province than where you went to law school in, but that's not really a "hoop" per se, it's just probably going to be a bit more challenging because you will have to learn the Ontario-specific bar materials on your own. But it's doable and done all the time.

U of C is a great law school. Doing your undergrad there and law school is totally fine. You won't be disadvantaged by doing so. If money and debt is such a major factor for you, please don't get caught up in the I have to go to a "reputable" "prestigious" law school otherwise I'm totally screwed rhetoric because it's incorrect. No one cares where you went to law school as long as it's in Canada. The differences are so minor they're almost meaningless, assuming you perform at a high level wherever you go.

Finally, since you're still in high school, you've got four years to figure out if you even want to go to law school when you're done. Also, getting in to law school isn't guaranteed either. So I'd suggest finding an undergrad (if you haven't already) that you find interesting and can get you a job outside of law and focus on that. Get excellent grades and don't worry about anything else. Revisit this question sometime in the second half of third year when you're preparing to write the LSAT. Maybe by then you'll have a better idea of what you want or can afford.

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2 minutes ago, Ryn said:

I think you should firstly try and figure out where you want to stay and practice. Do you want to stay in Alberta? Or are you shooting for Toronto Bay Street biglaw? If the answer is the latter, maybe you want to consider an Ontario school, but even so it's not necessary. Plenty of people get hired for Bay Street who aren't from Toronto. And even if you don't, you can lateral there if you spend a few years working at a similar level in Calgary, for example. The only extra hoop you'd have to jump through is getting licensed in a different province than where you went to law school in, but that's not really a "hoop" per se, it's just probably going to be a bit more challenging because you will have to learn the Ontario-specific bar materials on your own. But it's doable and done all the time.

 U of C is a great law school. Doing your undergrad there and law school is totally fine. You won't be disadvantaged by doing so. If money and debt is such a major factor for you, please don't get caught up in the I have to go to a "reputable" "prestigious" law school otherwise I'm totally screwed rhetoric because it's incorrect. No one cares where you went to law school as long as it's in Canada. The differences are so minor they're almost meaningless, assuming you perform at a high level wherever you go.

Finally, since you're still in high school, you've got four years to figure out if you even want to go to law school when you're done. Also, getting in to law school isn't guaranteed either. So I'd suggest finding an undergrad (if you haven't already) that you find interesting and can get you a job outside of law and focus on that. Get excellent grades and don't worry about anything else. Revisit this question sometime in the second half of third year when you're preparing to write the LSAT. Maybe by then you'll have a better idea of what you want or can afford.

I guess this clears things up. My fixation with becoming a lawyer is due to it being the career most involved and aligned with my interests; politics, history, and debate. I don't really see that entirely in other careers in comparison to law, and advice I've gotten hitherto hasn't been from, well, lawyers and other legal professionals. I'll look into it further. Don't get me wrong though, I'd still love to study law outside of Alberta, but if money and admissions are issues, I'll have to consider things more throughly. Shoot, I'm not entirely sure if I want to practice law just yet in Canada. 

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If you haven't started undergrad yet, it's far too early for you to be worrying about law school finances. You still have lots of time to figure your path out. 

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