Jump to content
krnprykt

Why ppl sell law school books?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I've seen on numerous occasions that people are trying to sell their law school books, aren't they going to be useful in practice? It feels weird to sell books after the semester ends, I mean that are those books only useful for their related courses and nothing more?

I appreciate all the comments.:)

Edited by krnprykt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you’re at a big firm it will have a library. If you’re never going to practice in the area you don’t need it. Many textbooks have electronic versions. Many students don’t care and just need it for the course. Money is nice. I’m sure others will chime in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
  1. Most law school books are obsolete a few years after publish. Unless you have the seminal treatise on a general subject, like contract law for example (and even those typically get updates every few years), you'll be missing key recent cases and statutory amendments, etc.
  2. Texts have their max resale value the semester after use...every year after that they approach zero dollars. Not only is it not weird, it is the most rational time to sell your books.
  3. If you work for a firm, government, or other organization, you'll probably get updated versions of the texts you need.
  4. Westlaw/Lexis have lots of great texts and resources if you have access. CanLii offers good free resources from time to time.
  5. If you don't work for a firm, government, or other organization, and live in a large city, you can hit a law library as needed. Most courthouses have a dece library.

Sell those suckers I say. 

Edited by FineCanadianFXs
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

As stated above, the common law is in a constant state of evolution and so it's not uncommon for a casebook to become antiquated within a few years, if not less.

Edited by harveyspecter993

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sold them because I couldn't stand the sight of some of these textbooks (looking at you Constitution and Admin). The only alternative is to burn them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have sold mine, and eventually they became garbage. In the area that I practice, the few books I genuinely want and need get updated regularly. In the many, many areas I don't practice, a text book with selected case law that's more than a few years old is worse than useless. Even if I might be tempted to consult one of them, it would really just be professionally negligent to rely on anything I found there.

Seriously. Not selling old textbooks for whatever you can get for them is just an absolute waste.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Diplock said:

I should have sold mine, and eventually they became garbage. In the area that I practice, the few books I genuinely want and need get updated regularly. In the many, many areas I don't practice, a text book with selected case law that's more than a few years old is worse than useless. Even if I might be tempted to consult one of them, it would really just be professionally negligent to rely on anything I found there.

Seriously. Not selling old textbooks for whatever you can get for them is just an absolute waste.

I have a few boxes of law books that are gathering dust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • You drink while studying?
    • I think I once passed through Saskatchewan by train, and I've flown over it a number of times. But seeing comment excerpts in the sidebar attracted me to this thread. I was just wondering why OP is so against a lunch break. If she doesn't want to eat lunch okay, but why should other people be denied the opportunity?! Eating in class is problematic for multiple reasons (sound, smell, sight, spring to mind). And what's wrong with having a day off in the middle of the week, in which she could study all day at home, sipping old fashioneds?
    • I scored a 156 on the July LSAT and I'm seriously considering canceling my score. My poor GPA doesn't help my situation either. I consistently scored between 152-162 on PT's. My list of schools I'd like to get into goes something like this; McGill, Calgary, Queens, Dalhousie, Windsor and then Western. Any input, advice or general help would be amazing for me as I'm struggling with this decision.
    • Okay, listen here, ass hat. I like to do my reading at home, the way I've been doing it for the past four years during my undergrad. Obviously it worked for me since I got into law school. I'm not interested in lugging my books all over Hell's half acre trying to find a quiet corner of the library or student lounge to read in when I can do it from the comfort of my couch with an old fashioned. Furthermore, I don't need someone to block out time in the middle of my day for me to do my readings since I'm a night owl as is. It would be much more productive for me, and undoubtedly others, if we could set our own schedules. By the way, the period goes inside of the quotation mark. Idiot. 
    • On the bright side, having your thumb up your ass might prevent you from speaking out of it. 
×
×
  • Create New...