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I got a 155 on the first LSAT practice test I ever took (June 2007). However I made the mistake of not timing when I wrote it as a diagnostic and basically took my time for each question. 

Is there anything that I can take out of this? What are the chances that I can get up to a 160+ on the real thing in September? 

I’m hesitant to waste another practice as a diagnostic, but I also don’t want to start studying before I take it - want to know what elements I’ve got a good grip and where I should focus my study time instead of just blindly studying everything.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, and please feel free to be brutally honest

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Just my two cents on this, others might feel different.

First of all, if you commit yourself over these next two months for the September LSAT there's absolutely no reason why you can't get a 160 or higher. The diagnostic is actually a terrible indicator of a potential future score (personally my actual score ended up being 14 points higher than my timed diagnostic after a month of study), however it is important to get a sense of the time limits and which areas you should focus on like you said. The understanding of time constraints is important, and also why I think taking another diagnostic, this time properly timed, would not be a waste of your time. Perhaps it won't be as effective since it won't be a true first experience, but I still think you'll benefit in the long run. 

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You can't take anything out of it from score prediction purposes - a major component of the test is time management, not just identifying the logic but doing so in about 95 seconds per question (on average). 

 

I mean, a "diagnostic" isn't anything magical, though - it's just the label you give to the first score you get. I presume you'll be doing another test - this time under time constraints - so whatever number you get out of that will be the one you can call 'diagnostic', not that that really means anything. There are something like 90 tests available now, having used one to gain familiarity with the structure instead of timing yourself isn't any material loss of questions. The one you've done will tell you things like which areas you struggled with more - even taking your sweet time, you've probably got more questions right or wrong on some types than others, and you can look at the questions and identify the ones you spent longer on (ie, were struggling more with).

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I think: Don't rely on that, but it's no big deal, you didn't screw anything up. You could do another test and I would think it's still taking it "cold". I would personally do another diagnostic under timed conditions just to see roughly where you're at. Then you could (possibly) guess whether you could get to the 160+ you need by September. In any case, if I am not mistaken, people use the diagnostic to gauge roughly where their score will peak (they say around 10 points). But that would vary quite a bit with the person.

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