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TrickyDicky

Best way to get into University of Alberta Law?

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I just graduated high school and really want to go to law school eventually. I’ll be starting  my first year of university at the U of A this fall, I have the Alberta Guaranteed Admission to the U of A school of business. I aim to pursue a commerce degree in Business Economics and Law. Is this the best pre-law major? What are the best tips for getting the right GPA and starting preparation for the LSAT?

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There's no best prelaw program, only the best program for you. My advice is to take an undergraduate course that you are passionate about. Being passionate about your program makes studying a fun thing to do, you'll have an easier time paying attention in class if you like the material. If that's a commerce degree, so be it.

If you decide to pursue arts as an undergrad for whatever reason at the UofA, some sound advice is to take your language requirements outside of your L2, because these courses are notoriously hard to get a good grade in.

For the LSAT prep, I recommend familiarizing yourself with some basic principles of logic. You're in your first year, so there's plenty of time to prep for the LSAT. However, I recommend taking Phil 120 or whatever it is which is a class in informal logic and critical reasoning. The skills taught by that course will help you immensely. 

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Minor in philosophy, take as many logic classes as your GPA will allow. They will help you more on the LSAT, and in law school than any other course you can take. Law school is reading and writing. The LSAT is reading critical thinking. The department that best prepares you for that is philosophy. 

 

Other than that emphasis, everything Harvey said is spot on. UA only cares about numbers, and even then, only the last 2. Have fun in undergrad, you don't need to be on every student association and taking every volunteer opportunity. That may help you get a job at a firm, but it won't help you get into law. 

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I agree with the above posters, and also wanted to emphasize what UAbear said about the UofA being a numbers school. All they care about is a high GPA and LSAT score, so as long as your marks are high it doesn't matter what you major in.

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I disagree with people when they say do something that you are passionate about.

If you are sure that you want to get into law school and you live in Edmonton, I believe you should enroll in the business degree at NAIT. It is a easy program, classes are not crowded, it is business related, which I found helpful if you want to work for the big firms in Edmonton. Also, it is very cheap and you can finish it in 3 years if you take summer courses. TBH if you go to NAIT, you will also have lots free time to prep for LSAT.  

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On 7/5/2019 at 1:20 PM, NeoKhan said:

I disagree with people when they say do something that you are passionate about.

If you are sure that you want to get into law school and you live in Edmonton, I believe you should enroll in the business degree at NAIT. It is a easy program, classes are not crowded, it is business related, which I found helpful if you want to work for the big firms in Edmonton. Also, it is very cheap and you can finish it in 3 years if you take summer courses. TBH if you go to NAIT, you will also have lots free time to prep for LSAT.  

If you hate business though, you're less likely to perform well.  My undergrad is Commerce, but I really love the strategy of business and finance.  Some people get way more out of delving into philosophical research,  or studying biochemistry, or immersing themselves in a world of code.  If you have to spend years learning a topic, it should a topic that you both enjoy and that you can perform well in.  Logically, a person is more likely to do well at something they enjoy doing. 

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On 7/12/2019 at 8:09 AM, Iheartcats said:

If you hate business though, you're less likely to perform well.  My undergrad is Commerce, but I really love the strategy of business and finance.  Some people get way more out of delving into philosophical research,  or studying biochemistry, or immersing themselves in a world of code.  If you have to spend years learning a topic, it should a topic that you both enjoy and that you can perform well in.  Logically, a person is more likely to do well at something they enjoy doing. 

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

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Just now, NeoKhan said:

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

Certainly not the best way to set yourself up for law school (which IS challenging), but I guess we each walk our own path.  

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3 hours ago, Iheartcats said:

Certainly not the best way to set yourself up for law school (which IS challenging), but I guess we each walk our own path.  

I did not find it challenging. TBH enrolling in a university course, which is curved and difficult is not the best way to set yourself up for law school either. I have to say it cost way less than the University of Alberta courses; if you are not paying for your uni tuition fees, it does not matter.

Remember if someone mess up their GPA  while studying what they are passionate about they would never get into law school. 

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3 hours ago, NeoKhan said:

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

this....just seems off to me. why would they give you an A you might not deserve? JUST because you wanna go to law school? like there arent thousands of others who have the same goal?? plus i know people in the business program at NAIT and this isnt their experience. Im sure you found it easy, good for you, but idk if that's typical.

Edited by bigfudge2017

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