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Best way to get into University of Alberta Law?

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I just graduated high school and really want to go to law school eventually. I’ll be starting  my first year of university at the U of A this fall, I have the Alberta Guaranteed Admission to the U of A school of business. I aim to pursue a commerce degree in Business Economics and Law. Is this the best pre-law major? What are the best tips for getting the right GPA and starting preparation for the LSAT?

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There's no best prelaw program, only the best program for you. My advice is to take an undergraduate course that you are passionate about. Being passionate about your program makes studying a fun thing to do, you'll have an easier time paying attention in class if you like the material. If that's a commerce degree, so be it.

If you decide to pursue arts as an undergrad for whatever reason at the UofA, some sound advice is to take your language requirements outside of your L2, because these courses are notoriously hard to get a good grade in.

For the LSAT prep, I recommend familiarizing yourself with some basic principles of logic. You're in your first year, so there's plenty of time to prep for the LSAT. However, I recommend taking Phil 120 or whatever it is which is a class in informal logic and critical reasoning. The skills taught by that course will help you immensely. 

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Minor in philosophy, take as many logic classes as your GPA will allow. They will help you more on the LSAT, and in law school than any other course you can take. Law school is reading and writing. The LSAT is reading critical thinking. The department that best prepares you for that is philosophy. 

 

Other than that emphasis, everything Harvey said is spot on. UA only cares about numbers, and even then, only the last 2. Have fun in undergrad, you don't need to be on every student association and taking every volunteer opportunity. That may help you get a job at a firm, but it won't help you get into law. 

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I agree with the above posters, and also wanted to emphasize what UAbear said about the UofA being a numbers school. All they care about is a high GPA and LSAT score, so as long as your marks are high it doesn't matter what you major in.

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I disagree with people when they say do something that you are passionate about.

If you are sure that you want to get into law school and you live in Edmonton, I believe you should enroll in the business degree at NAIT. It is a easy program, classes are not crowded, it is business related, which I found helpful if you want to work for the big firms in Edmonton. Also, it is very cheap and you can finish it in 3 years if you take summer courses. TBH if you go to NAIT, you will also have lots free time to prep for LSAT.  

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On 7/5/2019 at 1:20 PM, NeoKhan said:

I disagree with people when they say do something that you are passionate about.

If you are sure that you want to get into law school and you live in Edmonton, I believe you should enroll in the business degree at NAIT. It is a easy program, classes are not crowded, it is business related, which I found helpful if you want to work for the big firms in Edmonton. Also, it is very cheap and you can finish it in 3 years if you take summer courses. TBH if you go to NAIT, you will also have lots free time to prep for LSAT.  

If you hate business though, you're less likely to perform well.  My undergrad is Commerce, but I really love the strategy of business and finance.  Some people get way more out of delving into philosophical research,  or studying biochemistry, or immersing themselves in a world of code.  If you have to spend years learning a topic, it should a topic that you both enjoy and that you can perform well in.  Logically, a person is more likely to do well at something they enjoy doing. 

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On 7/12/2019 at 8:09 AM, Iheartcats said:

If you hate business though, you're less likely to perform well.  My undergrad is Commerce, but I really love the strategy of business and finance.  Some people get way more out of delving into philosophical research,  or studying biochemistry, or immersing themselves in a world of code.  If you have to spend years learning a topic, it should a topic that you both enjoy and that you can perform well in.  Logically, a person is more likely to do well at something they enjoy doing. 

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

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Just now, NeoKhan said:

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

Certainly not the best way to set yourself up for law school (which IS challenging), but I guess we each walk our own path.  

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3 hours ago, Iheartcats said:

Certainly not the best way to set yourself up for law school (which IS challenging), but I guess we each walk our own path.  

I did not find it challenging. TBH enrolling in a university course, which is curved and difficult is not the best way to set yourself up for law school either. I have to say it cost way less than the University of Alberta courses; if you are not paying for your uni tuition fees, it does not matter.

Remember if someone mess up their GPA  while studying what they are passionate about they would never get into law school. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, NeoKhan said:

I agree with you, but the program at NAIT is so basic that as long as you show up to the class and mention to the instructor that you are planning to go to law school, most of them will try their best to make sure you will get an A. AKA the program is not intellectually challenging at all!

this....just seems off to me. why would they give you an A you might not deserve? JUST because you wanna go to law school? like there arent thousands of others who have the same goal?? plus i know people in the business program at NAIT and this isnt their experience. Im sure you found it easy, good for you, but idk if that's typical.

Edited by bigfudge2017

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Honestly you could always pick an easy program to get A's and get into law school but once you're in what then? You're competing with students who performed well in a variety of courses (some of which are incredibly difficult). You'll go in unprepared to handle the amount of information that you need to understand to get a competing grade. Many drop out within the first 3 months because they couldn't handle it. Besides, when you're trying to get interviews at firms, your grades do matter. 

It's always best to just learn something you find interesting, that way you'll put in the effort without forcing yourself. Use your time in undergrad to train your ability to understand material otherwise you won't be able to survive the amount of reading we have. 

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On 7/15/2019 at 5:19 PM, bigfudge2017 said:

this....just seems off to me. why would they give you an A you might not deserve? JUST because you wanna go to law school? like there arent thousands of others who have the same goal?? plus i know people in the business program at NAIT and this isnt their experience. Im sure you found it easy, good for you, but idk if that's typical.

The program at NAIT is less challenging than other programs at the UofA simply b/c the courses are not curved. 

My understanding is that at NAIT b/c the courses are not curved, the lecturer has some discretion to raise your grade from an A- to an  A , again  that is my experience, it may be different for other people.

Law school courses are curved and TBH if you work hard it is not that difficult to get a B or B-. In my case typing speed had more impact on my grade than my peers intelligence.

Unlike the "thousands of others who have the same goal" OP actually smart enough to plan his path to law school. Once you have a shit GPA, you are done. 

 

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On 7/19/2019 at 4:07 PM, Alterion said:

Many drop out within the first 3 months because they couldn't handle it. Besides, when you're trying to get interviews at firms, your grades do matter. 

Only 2 people dropped out in my year and one of them did it due to mental illness. At the end of the day if you have shit GPA from your undergrad, you will not get in and you cannot even apply to interviews. Again undergard GPA is not an accurate predictor of someone's performance in law school .

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Posted (edited)

Choosing a school/program specifically to minimize one's chances of getting rejected from law school is not worth it, in my opinion. OP, if you do plan on going into business at U of A though, you should still look into the various leadership opportunities, case competitions, internships, and possibly the PRIME Program. Not because U of A law would be impressed by them, but because undergrad should be much more than just a pre-law program. 

That being said, discrete math might be a course you would be interested in since it can be helpful for the LSAT. 

Edited by Twenty

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On 7/22/2019 at 12:22 PM, NeoKhan said:

Only 2 people dropped out in my year and one of them did it due to mental illness. At the end of the day if you have shit GPA from your undergrad, you will not get in and you cannot even apply to interviews. Again undergard GPA is not an accurate predictor of someone's performance in law school .

I don't think undergrad GPA or LSAT score is indicative of one's performance. At the end of the day, it's all about hard work and how much you are willing to sacrifice. My LSAT score was abyssmal (154) and I still ended with a B+ avg and an award for one of my classes through sheer hard work.

What I was trying to say is that someone should pick something that they love to learn so that they will naturally develop good work habits and transfer those habits into law school (which is exactly what I did). It doesn't matter how high your undergrad GPA or LSAT score is, if you don't study hard you won't do well. 

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