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When applying to Ontario law schools is it worth it to pay for an application consultant? If so which companies do you recommend? 

I have a 159 LSAT and an 83% GPA, I do lots of volunteer work mostly at the court house and have been both the Treasurer and President of a club during my undergrad. 

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Seriously?  That's even a thing?  What do they possibly charge you for?  Writing your personal statement for you?  No, you should just write it yourself and have several people edit it.  And I wouldn't bother mentioning the treasurer/president in that statement.  Basically everyone has those ECs.

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I can maybe see doing it when applying to a T14... but not here in Canada. If you really want to spend some $$, maybe for a LSAT retake to put you over 160? 

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Seems to be a thing in the US but I haven’t heard of a service that does this in Canada. The application process in Canada is much more straightforward than in the US anyways so even if such a service exists, I don’t think it’s worth the cost.

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23 minutes ago, ProfReader said:

Seriously?  That's even a thing?  What do they possibly charge you for?  Writing your personal statement for you?  No, you should just write it yourself and have several people edit it.  And I wouldn't bother mentioning the treasurer/president in that statement.  Basically everyone has those ECs.

I'd still mention it, as attached to some quality like "managing multiple commitments while maintaining strong academic performance". But don't spend your whole statement talking about it.

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42 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

I'd still mention it, as attached to some quality like "managing multiple commitments while maintaining strong academic performance". But don't spend your whole statement talking about it.

You can put it on your list of ECs. I agree with proofreader that it isn't something to mention in your PS. 

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1 hour ago, pzabbythesecond said:

I'd still mention it, as attached to some quality like "managing multiple commitments while maintaining strong academic performance". But don't spend your whole statement talking about it.

Agree to disagree.  Not worth detracting from the word count in the personal statement.  If you are only going to mention it, you may as well just leave it on the list of ECs.  I also don't think it really illustrates managing multiple commitments since many such clubs only meet a couple of times a year.

Edited by ProfReader

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23 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

You can put it on your list of ECs. I agree with proofreader that it isn't something to mention in your PS. 

This one made me chuckle.

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Helllllllllll no, your good to go for like every school except U of T. 

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40 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

This one made me chuckle.

You're welcome for the chuckle. That will teach me to type while holding my 18 month old, who wanted to add his opinion. ;)

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48 minutes ago, AJD19 said:

Helllllllllll no, your good to go for like every school except U of T. 

Not that this needs to turn into the millionth thread about grades and LSAT, but I hardly think a 159 LSAT qualifies for every school except UofT.

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12 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

Not that this needs to turn into the millionth thread about grades and LSAT, but I hardly think a 159 LSAT qualifies for every school except UofT.

Welll you would be wrong there sir. I got into every school in Ontario minus U of T with a 3.61 CGPA and 156 

Edited by AJD19

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3 hours ago, AJD19 said:

Welll you would be wrong there sir. I got into every school in Ontario minus U of T with a 3.61 CGPA and 156 

Well I mean the median LSAT for most Ontario schools is at or above 160. That being a median, a 159 isn’t hard to imagine being admissible but “good to go” is probably a bit generous. Well done on your admission, but remember a single person getting in with those stats (or even many) does not mean it will be the case for every other person. 

As for mentioning club exec positions, I agree it’s not worth it. Almost every applicant had similar ECs. Unless you did something amazing in that role, I’d save it for the sketch. That being said, I found the sketch to be of minor or insignificant importance compared to the PS so take from that what you will. 

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15 minutes ago, Ryn said:

Well I mean the median LSAT for most Ontario schools is at or above 160. That being a median, a 159 isn’t hard to imagine being admissible but “good to go” is probably a bit generous. Well done on your admission, but remember a single person getting in with those stats (or even many) does not mean it will be the case for every other person. 

As for mentioning club exec positions, I agree it’s not worth it. Almost every applicant had similar ECs. Unless you did something amazing in that role, I’d save it for the sketch. That being said, I found the sketch to be of minor or insignificant importance compared to the PS so take from that what you will. 

Agreed, "good to go" was definitely a generous statement for such a score. However, the main thrust of the statement was to address the comment that a 159 would "hardly qualify you". With a good GPA, as my acceptances have shown, even a lower score can qualify you. Of course you cant generalize from an outlier, but theres plenty of people getting into Ontario schools with 154-159 scores. 

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If I were in your position I would take the 180$ and use it towards improving your lsat. I got into u of t and McGill without a consultant (though I had profs look at my statement). A 165+ on the lsat will take you farther imo. 

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17 hours ago, ProfReader said:

And I wouldn't bother mentioning the treasurer/president in that statement.  Basically everyone has those ECs.

Are those really that frequent? The 8 people I knew applying didn't have those positions and I've read a few other statements and they also said they didn't have those. I don't see why you wouldn't talk about them. I don't know about you but I'm not interesting enough to not talk about what few ECs I have.

I haven't travelled or had any crazy life experiences and I don't have a profound reason for wanting to be a lawyer, so what else?

Edited by thedraper

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2 hours ago, thedraper said:

Are those really that frequent? The 8 people I knew applying didn't have those positions and I've read a few other statements and they also said they didn't have those. I don't see why you wouldn't talk about them. I don't know about you but I'm not interesting enough to not talk about what few ECs I have.

I haven't travelled or had any crazy life experiences and I don't have a profound reason for wanting to be a lawyer, so what else?

Yes, I'm sure, those are very common and generic ECs.  You don't need to talk about your ECs in your personal statement at all. Talk about life experiences that you had that have made you interested in law school or in a particular area of the law, talk about what you want to do as a lawyer, talk about volunteering at the courthouse, etc.

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I held similar positions and did talk about them in my PS. They further reinforced where my interests lie though and I was able to connect it to a possible future career path in law that I would be interested in. If it was something you're passionate about, you should definitely keep it in, but if its something super random and can't be connected at all to your abilities in law school or as a lawyer (basic skills I don't think are really worth mentioning as others have said), then imo don't bother wasting too much space on it

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1 hour ago, rugz said:

I held similar positions and did talk about them in my PS. They further reinforced where my interests lie though and I was able to connect it to a possible future career path in law that I would be interested in. If it was something you're passionate about, you should definitely keep it in, but if its something super random and can't be connected at all to your abilities in law school or as a lawyer (basic skills I don't think are really worth mentioning as others have said), then imo don't bother wasting too much space on it

I don't mean to pick on you specifically, but rather this is just me expressing my general frustration at students saying "but I got in by saying that in my personal statement" or "but I didn't use an academic reference" or whatever other thing.  You have no idea that helped you at all in the admissions process.  In fact, you might have been admitted in spite of them not thinking your personal statement was great or thinking those were lame ECs.  There is no way to know.  I am only sharing my view of those sorts of ECs along with those of my fellow admissions committee members at one school, but I really don't think that anecdotal examples do anything to refute those more broad discussions of such ECs.  Also, I don't think whether you are passionate about something should be the test of whether to include it in your personal statement.

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Just as your cover letter should not be a mirror copy of your resume, your personal statement should not list all of your EC, academic achievements and roles to date. These are supposed to be focused and are supposed to tell a story, that is the entire point of writing them.

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