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prospectivelaw

Writing at Chelsea Hotel downtown Toronto - experience?

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Hi! 

I am thinking of switching my test center to the Chelsea Hotel downtown Toronto - it wasn't an option when I signed up. I live RIGHT next to it so it seems like an ideal place. It will cost me 125$ so I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on their experience there! I am signed up at the Montecassino right now which is around a 40 minute TTC commute :S 

 

Thanks!

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I wrote at the Montecassino in North York. Despite it not being a hot summer day, the AC was BLASTED so bring a sweater. Everyone wrote in one massive ballroom with 2 people to a large table. The chairs were uncomfortable ballroom chairs but I'd expect that anywhere, even places like Humber College. The table had a god damn table cloth on it so writing in a newspaper type booklet on fabric with a pencil was not fun. The sign-in place was tight and if you got there early enough you were stuck listening to how people prepared for the test. There was no where to sit while waiting so a lot of people just sat on the floor in a line. However, the staff knew what they were doing. They were not unnecessarily loud when the clock was running. The main speaker was confident and loud. They kept you confined to a small area of the hotel during break. The bathrooms have about 4 stalls in them so a line during break was inevitable. There isn't much food places around if that's a factor. Parking is super easy and theres a huge lot right outside the main door. Getting there by subway is easy enough. You get off at Downsview Park station and its a short walk over (maybe 4 mins?) you walk straight down the road so no issues there. It would make sense for it to be a 40 minute ride for you if you live downtown because Downsview Park station is super "north" and almost one of the last stations on the line. The general vicinity is peaceful and you won't hear any traffic noises. They were doing construction around the hotel last year but it was paused for the day of the test I believe. If anything, just stay at the hotel the night before. It's cheap, you'll be at ease just having to wake up and come downstairs, and its massive so you're bound to find space to stay. I didn't stay there the night before the test but I have stayed there before, it was a great hotel stay imo. I personally wouldn't write downtown because the city gives me anxiety and there's always something going on it feels like. Hotel guests would also be a factor for me. Surely they'll be significantly more people staying at the downtown hotel vs. Montecassino. There's pros and cons for both. 

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Posted (edited)

I don't think Chelsea Hotel is a usual testing centre, as it wasn't listed in the list of testing centres. This is my 3rd write and it's the first time I'm seeing it offered. 

Edited by philodendron

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if it will relieve some of your stress on the day of the exam I'd say go for it! anything to make it easier on yourself as it's a rough day, and having to worry about TTC is not ideal! 

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