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SweetPotato

How many law schools will you be applying to?

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10 hours ago, AJD19 said:

Christ i applied every school in the country 

For those preparing to apply in a future cycle, I don't know anyone who would recommend doing this. Ideally, having a valid LSAT score and calculating your gpa info for each school's method of assessment, you will have a very good idea of where you will be a competitive applicant and where you won't. Applying everywhere is going to be a huge waste of time and money. 

You should have some idea of where you want to practice and it's wise to keep that in mind when you are compiling your list of schools. If your stats are good enough to get into the schools that are the most competitive, and where you'd prefer to attend, there is no reason to apply to the schools spread across the country that are not as competitive in admission. If your stats are not good enough to get into the most competitive schools, then there is no reason to waste your app fees, and your time, in applying to those. Target the schools where you have a reasonable chance and where you eventually want to practice.

Doing some research will always be beneficial as admission stats are readily available, both on schools' websites and also here on the forum in the Admitted threads. 

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Yeah I applied to like 7 schools out of anxiety of not getting in. 2 schools weren’t even in the province that I wished to work in. It was a huge waste of money. If you have relatively good stats there is no need to apply country wide 

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4 hours ago, erinl2 said:

For those preparing to apply in a future cycle, I don't know anyone who would recommend doing this. Ideally, having a valid LSAT score and calculating your gpa info for each school's method of assessment, you will have a very good idea of where you will be a competitive applicant and where you won't. Applying everywhere is going to be a huge waste of time and money. 

You should have some idea of where you want to practice and it's wise to keep that in mind when you are compiling your list of schools. If your stats are good enough to get into the schools that are the most competitive, and where you'd prefer to attend, there is no reason to apply to the schools spread across the country that are not as competitive in admission. If your stats are not good enough to get into the most competitive schools, then there is no reason to waste your app fees, and your time, in applying to those. Target the schools where you have a reasonable chance and where you eventually want to practice.

Doing some research will always be beneficial as admission stats are readily available, both on schools' websites and also here on the forum in the Admitted threads. 

Thanks! 

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4 hours ago, healthlaw said:

Yeah I applied to like 7 schools out of anxiety of not getting in. 2 schools weren’t even in the province that I wished to work in. It was a huge waste of money. If you have relatively good stats there is no need to apply country wide 

Yeah for the schools I really wouldn't want to go to, I won't apply. 

Thanks! 

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I pretty much applied everywhere since I had a not particularly competitive GPA. I didn't apply to UoT, UNB, McGill and Lakehead as I didn't think I had a good chance or because I didn't want to live +/or practice there. During the application process, I wasn't confident in my ability to gauge my chances, which is why I over-applied. But, I recognize that I'm lucky to be in a position where I was financially able to do so in order to have a bit more peace of mind. 

For reference letters, I made up a personalized application package for each of my referees, which included steps on how to submit, the deadlines and all of my application materials. Since two of my referees were submitting 5-7 letters, I gave them about 6 weeks - just in case they needed more time. They both submitted within a week of me dropping off the instructions, but said they appreciated the offer of extra time given the volume of references. (Also, when I asked them for law references, I had asked them to write letters for grad school maybe 4 months prior lol. I felt kind of bad, but they all said they really didn't mind having to submit that many!)

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1 hour ago, labr said:

I pretty much applied everywhere since I had a not particularly competitive GPA. I didn't apply to UoT, UNB, McGill and Lakehead as I didn't think I had a good chance or because I didn't want to live +/or practice there. During the application process, I wasn't confident in my ability to gauge my chances, which is why I over-applied. But, I recognize that I'm lucky to be in a position where I was financially able to do so in order to have a bit more peace of mind. 

For reference letters, I made up a personalized application package for each of my referees, which included steps on how to submit, the deadlines and all of my application materials. Since two of my referees were submitting 5-7 letters, I gave them about 6 weeks - just in case they needed more time. They both submitted within a week of me dropping off the instructions, but said they appreciated the offer of extra time given the volume of references. (Also, when I asked them for law references, I had asked them to write letters for grad school maybe 4 months prior lol. I felt kind of bad, but they all said they really didn't mind having to submit that many!)

Thanks! That makes me feel a lot more comfortable about asking my referees. I had a good relationship with them but I just didn't know how common it is to ask for many letters. My mom is a professor and she said she never had students ask her for more than 2-3 references. I will aim for about 6 weeks in advance then. Do you know if your referees used the same letter for every school, or did they have to tailor it a bit? Also for your personal statements, did you find you needed to change them for different schools or was it more of a universal statement (only taking into account the different word count requirements)?

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Although I applied to all schools in Ontario (excluding Lakehead), I was only seriously considering two. This doesn't mean that I would not go to any of the others if I were accepted. Those two were just my top choices. If you have the money, and are okay with going anywhere, apply broadly. But don't waste money on a school that you know you would not attend.

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UBC, UVic, Dalhousie, and every school in Ontario except Lakehead. Both BC schools didn't require a reference letter from me. As for the other schools I was fortunate enough to have multiple people willing to write references. I only had one professor that had to write one twice, which was for Dal and OLSAS.

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Back in the day I applied to every Ontario school except 1 and to two extra-provincial schools. Ended up getting only a few acceptances before my top choice (Osgoode) admitted me and I accepted, so I’m not sure how I would have fared in totality. My stats were competitive but not exceptional, so it was a bit of an unknown, thus my relatively broad application strategy. 

I think applying to all law schools in the country is a mistake. In Ontario, applying to all of them or nearly all of them is probably fine so long as you’re prepared to attend said schools. It’s best to analyze where you stand and go from there, but obviously the more borderline you are, the broader your applications will be. The less competitive you are, the more you can whittle down the list to the ones you have a chance at; vice-versa is true as well — the more competitive you are, the more you can focus on your top schools. People in the middle will likely end up submitting the most apps. 

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5 hours ago, LuckyCommander said:

Although I applied to all schools in Ontario (excluding Lakehead), I was only seriously considering two. This doesn't mean that I would not go to any of the others if I were accepted. Those two were just my top choices. If you have the money, and are okay with going anywhere, apply broadly. But don't waste money on a school that you know you would not attend.

Since money isn't a concern (my parents are happy to pay), I will just apply to all the schools I may want to attend (which is a lot haha). Yeah, Lakehead doesn't sound appealing to me either. 

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5 hours ago, NavAcid said:

UBC, UVic, Dalhousie, and every school in Ontario except Lakehead. Both BC schools didn't require a reference letter from me. As for the other schools I was fortunate enough to have multiple people willing to write references. I only had one professor that had to write one twice, which was for Dal and OLSAS.

Nice! Thank you!

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4 hours ago, Ryn said:

Back in the day I applied to every Ontario school except 1 and to two extra-provincial schools. Ended up getting only a few acceptances before my top choice (Osgoode) admitted me and I accepted, so I’m not sure how I would have fared in totality. My stats were competitive but not exceptional, so it was a bit of an unknown, thus my relatively broad application strategy. 

I think applying to all law schools in the country is a mistake. In Ontario, applying to all of them or nearly all of them is probably fine so long as you’re prepared to attend said schools. It’s best to analyze where you stand and go from there, but obviously the more borderline you are, the broader your applications will be. The less competitive you are, the more you can whittle down the list to the ones you have a chance at; vice-versa is true as well — the more competitive you are, the more you can focus on your top schools. People in the middle will likely end up submitting the most apps. 

I guess I am worrying about this too early, I still need to write and get my LSAT results, then I will know where I stand.

That's true, I do notice people in the middle applying the most broadly. 

Edited by SweetPotato
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On 6/15/2019 at 8:20 PM, SweetPotato said:

Thanks! That makes me feel a lot more comfortable about asking my referees. I had a good relationship with them but I just didn't know how common it is to ask for many letters. My mom is a professor and she said she never had students ask her for more than 2-3 references. I will aim for about 6 weeks in advance then. Do you know if your referees used the same letter for every school, or did they have to tailor it a bit? Also for your personal statements, did you find you needed to change them for different schools or was it more of a universal statement (only taking into account the different word count requirements)?

I’m not entirely sure but I think my profs just used the same letter! Most of the schools asked for the same info from referees, so it was okay to just use the same one! 

For personal statements, I tailored mine to each school. Since the questions were sometimes a bit different, i just made sure i actually answered the questions the school asked. I really wanted to go to one school, so I spent extra time really tailoring my statement to that school. I spent a considerable amount of time on all my statements tbh, but I put the most amount of work into my top school. I doubt my referees read each personal statement since they were all somewhat similar and since there were 13 lol, but I gave all of them to each of my referees anyways. Also, one of my profs had a specific procedure for requesting reference letters so I would recommend just asking them / giving them a heads up a few weeks before you actually send them any materials. 

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19 minutes ago, labr said:

I’m not entirely sure but I think my profs just used the same letter! Most of the schools asked for the same info from referees, so it was okay to just use the same one! 

For personal statements, I tailored mine to each school. Since the questions were sometimes a bit different, i just made sure i actually answered the questions the school asked. I really wanted to go to one school, so I spent extra time really tailoring my statement to that school. I spent a considerable amount of time on all my statements tbh, but I put the most amount of work into my top school. I doubt my referees read each personal statement since they were all somewhat similar and since there were 13 lol, but I gave all of them to each of my referees anyways. Also, one of my profs had a specific procedure for requesting reference letters so I would recommend just asking them / giving them a heads up a few weeks before you actually send them any materials. 

Thank you so much! Ah, I hope my professors don't mind reading all of mine. Good thing they can just submit the same letter! 

That's a good point! I will give them a heads up a few weeks in advance then. I hope you ended up at your preferred school :). 

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apply broadly if you're not picky about the school! you never know what different schools are looking for in their selection criteria as grades and LSAT scores are absolutely not everything. I applied with a 155 LSAT and mid 80's average out of undergrad, and through I would have a tough time getting into Osgoode or u of t with those numbers, but then ended up getting waitlisted at some of the "safe" schools that I applied to and ended up at Osgoode. don't worry about inconveniencing your references - do what's best for you.

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1 hour ago, anonymouslawyer said:

apply broadly if you're not picky about the school! you never know what different schools are looking for in their selection criteria as grades and LSAT scores are absolutely not everything. I applied with a 155 LSAT and mid 80's average out of undergrad, and through I would have a tough time getting into Osgoode or u of t with those numbers, but then ended up getting waitlisted at some of the "safe" schools that I applied to and ended up at Osgoode. don't worry about inconveniencing your references - do what's best for you.

I am definitely open to all but two (that shall remain unnamed) law schools in Canada :).Yeah it's hard to predict, from these forums I saw people getting rejected from some schools whilst getting accepted by more competitive ones. Wow that's awesome that you got into Osgoode! 

Thank you! 

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I will probably apply to U of O, UBC, U of T, McGill, Osgoode, Queens, Dalhousie. But, it really depends on how well I do on my LSAT. :) 

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2 hours ago, Lawstudentdreamz said:

I will probably apply to U of O, UBC, U of T, McGill, Osgoode, Queens, Dalhousie. But, it really depends on how well I do on my LSAT. :) 

Same, depends on my LSAT :). 

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3 hours ago, Whosiewhatsie said:

I applied to only 1.

I would be too nervous with only one 😥

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