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Just Another Post About Landing a 2L Job on Bay St

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Posted (edited)
On 6/14/2019 at 1:29 PM, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it unwise to apply to different offices of of the same firm for OCIs? Eg applying to both  BJ's Calgary and Toronto offices? My concern is that since the application periods overlap, the recruiter in each city would know about the separate application and question my commitment to their city.

Depends on the firm, I am sure some don't care, but for a lot of them it would be a red flag. That's what a lot of recruiters told us anyways.

Edited by Starling
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7 hours ago, Starling said:

Depends on the firm, I am sure some don't care, but for a lot of them it would be a red flag. That's what a lot of recruiters told us anyways.

Thanks, that's what I suspected. I suppose only regional firms like Lawson are "safe" then. 

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2 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Thanks, that's what I suspected. I suppose only regional firms like Lawson are "safe" then. 

That would probably be what I would do, unless a recruiter says it's common/not a big deal for people to move between offices.

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On 6/14/2019 at 4:29 PM, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it unwise to apply to different offices of of the same firm for OCIs? Eg applying to both  BJ's Calgary and Toronto offices? My concern is that since the application periods overlap, the recruiter in each city would know about the separate application and question my commitment to their city.

Keep in mind that recruiters from the big firms talk to each other, so applying to both BJ's Calgary and Toronto might not be the only way to tip them off; applying to both BJ's Calgary and Blakes Toronto might also.

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5 hours ago, testcase said:

Keep in mind that recruiters from the big firms talk to each other, so applying to both BJ's Calgary and Toronto might not be the only way to tip them off; applying to both BJ's Calgary and Blakes Toronto might also.

While possibly true, this is probably overthinking it. I highly doubt recruiters talk outside of their city, their own firm's offices, and maybe a small circle beyond that. I may be wrong, but people apply to multiple markets and get offers every year. It's very easy to explain why you'd want to live and work in multiple places - and probably true for many people! It's not always just because you need a job. 

Now, keep in mind that one firm (Norton Rose) does not consider applicants in Ottawa who applied to Toronto; they literally screen out those candidates. They're the only firm I've heard of to do this though.

 

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Once applications open, is there an advantage in applying early or do firms wait till the deadline before reviewing the applications?

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38 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Once applications open, is there an advantage in applying early or do firms wait till the deadline before reviewing the applications?

No advantage.

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On 6/21/2019 at 1:25 PM, testcase said:

Keep in mind that recruiters from the big firms talk to each other, so applying to both BJ's Calgary and Toronto might not be the only way to tip them off; applying to both BJ's Calgary and Blakes Toronto might also.

I can perfectly understand two branches of the same firm but two different firms in two different cities seems like a stretch. What would even be the rationale for such a conversation?

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In cover letter, if you're trying to say that your interest piqued in the firm after speaking with a summer student who told you xyz, is it fine to simply say that you spoke with a summer student or should you name the student? I'm inclined to go with the former because I don't want to give the impression that I'm name dropping.

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4 hours ago, harveyspecter993 said:

In cover letter, if you're trying to say that your interest piqued in the firm after speaking with a summer student who told you xyz, is it fine to simply say that you spoke with a summer student or should you name the student? I'm inclined to go with the former because I don't want to give the impression that I'm name dropping.

IMO You can give the name. It’s fine. A summer student literally has no pull or influence so you can name drop them all you want to lol. It just helps to demonstrate that you went one step further and actually took time to speak with a specific person rather than pulling stuff off the website 

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It isn't a matter of name-dropping but I would suggest just saying a summer student without naming him/her. 

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7 hours ago, erinl2 said:

It isn't a matter of name-dropping but I would suggest just saying a summer student without naming him/her. 

Could you share your rationale?

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Posted (edited)

Just curious, when talking to summer students, what are the questions that you ask them?

Generally I ask them about the rotations/practice areas, what do they do, what are some interesting  experiences, how's firm's the atmosphere, and any tips based on your own interviews with the firm.

I'm not sure whether they are stupid questions and whether there are better and more specific questions that I can ask. (I'm always having doubts in this aspect as I've always been a socially awkward person 🤣)

Edited by Mocha

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Is it  a red flag to list a non-corporate course, eg  criminal procedure or family law, as an upper year course? How honest should one be about their upper year courses?

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7 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it  a red flag to list a non-corporate course, eg  criminal procedure or family law, as an upper year course? How honest should one be about their upper year courses?

You're going to be sending them final transcripts. Be honest. 

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35 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Is it  a red flag to list a non-corporate course, eg  criminal procedure or family law, as an upper year course? How honest should one be about their upper year courses?

I've spoken to a recruiter at a firm that shall remain unnamed. She told an anecdote about how one time she got one of these upper year course lists and most of the courses were corporate-transactional related. She said that her reaction to seeing that was that she felt like that person was closing a lot of doors for themselves and really narrowing themselves down, and she hoped they would change their mind later on and do some courses outside their obvious interests. Your mileage may vary.

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1 hour ago, whoknows said:

You're going to be sending them final transcripts. Be honest. 

No recruiter in the world is going to care if you change a few courses from the time you submit an application to the time you submit your final transcripts. Mine have changed radically, and certainly nobody at my firm gives a damn. 

I also think @wtamow‘s story about a recruiter is dumb. Students should take what they’re interested in – if you know after 1L what you want to practice and you can fill your schedule with classes that genuinely interest you, you should. 

That said, just be honest. If a firm isn’t going to hire you because you took Crim Pro, you probably don’t want to work at that firm. 

And needless to say, if you’re interested in criminal law, become a criminal lawyer. I’m watching all my 2L friends that obviously want to practice something not-big-law freak out and apply to big law firms right now. It’s sad to see, and I hope they realize their mistake before it’s too late. 

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37 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

No recruiter in the world is going to care if you change a few courses from the time you submit an application to the time you submit your final transcripts. Mine have changed radically, and certainly nobody at my firm gives a damn. 

I also think @wtamow‘s story about a recruiter is dumb. Students should take what they’re interested in – if you know after 1L what you want to practice and you can fill your schedule with classes that genuinely interest you, you should. 

That said, just be honest. If a firm isn’t going to hire you because you took Crim Pro, you probably don’t want to work at that firm. 

And needless to say, if you’re interested in criminal law, become a criminal lawyer. I’m watching all my 2L friends that obviously want to practice something not-big-law freak out and apply to big law firms right now. It’s sad to see, and I hope they realize their mistake before it’s too late. 

+1

Yea, this has become a ritual in law school. People go into law school wanting to not do Biglaw or corporate/commercial and then apply anyways when the recruit comes around. Some of them will even forego their interests to work at a Biglaw firm at the early stages of their career. The irony is that these same people will be looking to make a lateral move within a few years to practice in an area they like. It's a shame really that law school CDOs place such a premium on OCIs and nothing else. 

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1 hour ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

No recruiter in the world is going to care if you change a few courses from the time you submit an application to the time you submit your final transcripts. Mine have changed radically, and certainly nobody at my firm gives a damn. 

I also think @wtamow‘s story about a recruiter is dumb. Students should take what they’re interested in – if you know after 1L what you want to practice and you can fill your schedule with classes that genuinely interest you, you should. 

That said, just be honest. If a firm isn’t going to hire you because you took Crim Pro, you probably don’t want to work at that firm. 

And needless to say, if you’re interested in criminal law, become a criminal lawyer. I’m watching all my 2L friends that obviously want to practice something not-big-law freak out and apply to big law firms right now. It’s sad to see, and I hope they realize their mistake before it’s too late. 

I didn't say I agree with it. I think her point was you should put down classes you're interested in and actually plan on taking, instead of just putting down every class that you think would look good to the firm. It comes off as fake, and I can see that to a certain extent.

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