Jump to content
icecreamsandwich

Just Another Post About Landing a 2L Job on Bay St

Recommended Posts

I have some questions about what I should be doing this summer to give myself the best shot at successfully landing a Bay St job this fall. For context, I'm at Osgoode and I finished 1L with an A average. When I started law school I really did not know what I wanted to do, so I didn't join the business law society or do any other business law extra-circulars. I have an arts degree for an undergrad. I did a fair amount of volunteering (CLASP, PBSC) in 1L, but nothing I did suggests that I'm interested in corporate law at all. My job this summer is in a non-corporate area of law. Given these factors:

1. what can I do this summer to demonstrate an interest in corporate law? If I don't find anything corporate to add to my resume before August, how much will that impact my chances?

2.  What strategies can I use to network/determine which firm is best suited to my interests if I'm not in Toronto for the summer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody is interested in corporate law. Your grades will be fine on their own. 

You’ll get some sense of firm culture when interviewing. You can research practice rankings on Chambers. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, NYCLawyer said:

Nobody is interested in corporate law. Your grades will be fine on their own. 

You’ll get some sense of firm culture when interviewing. You can research practice rankings on Chambers. 

lol. I always think it's weird when people say this as a 1L. I would probably be more inclined to hire someone who unashamedly said its for the pay and later opportunities...a lot more believable. When you say you're interested in corporate law I just think you're dying to start due diligence and closing agendas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There’s definitely no reason to worry that your background ought to signal corporate stronger. Like NYC said, you just aren’t competing with a cohort of A students who knew from undergrad that they wanted to do leveraged financing. Most people are in your boat.

But you can start learning words that make you sound less dumb when you try to convince people you’re (now) interested during the interviews.

Standard advice is just start reading the business news every day. If you’re thinking of making a career out of this, and though it’s far from necessary, you’d probably want to get in the habit anyway. Pick a couple transactions or market events that are being followed closely and just start being an observer. If there are particular firms that interest you for whatever reason, set a google alert.

You probably don’t know what your interests are yet because you don’t know what the day-to-day life differences are for a private M&A lawyer, a finance lawyer, a funds formation lawyer, etc. Step one could be trying to set up coffees (or whatever) with junior associates at various firms and in various practice groups to ask them about what they really do - aside from the work-life or culture stuff, what part of their job is fun, what part sucks, etc. The minute I heard IPO lawyers describe what they like about their job, I knew IPO work was not ever going to be for me. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your A AVERAGE at Osgoode gives you all the shot you need lol. You did a few ECs. You’re fine. Don’t worry about your Arts background. Many people on Bay (myself included) don’t have a business background and didn’t need it to demonstrate interest to employers. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most law students don't have "business backgrounds". People who have "business backgrounds" get jobs without having to pay tens of thousands of dollars to go to law school.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Jaggers said:

Most law students don't have "business backgrounds". People who have "business backgrounds" get jobs without having to pay tens of thousands of dollars to go to law school.

Lots of people with business backgrounds decide to go to law school anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the responses.

Do you also think its ok that I miss all of the open houses/networking opportunities that firms are having right now because I'm not in Toronto for the summer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, icecreamsandwich said:

Thanks for all the responses.

Do you also think its ok that I miss all of the open houses/networking opportunities that firms are having right now because I'm not in Toronto for the summer?

It's fine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, icecreamsandwich said:

Thanks for all the responses.

Do you also think its ok that I miss all of the open houses/networking opportunities that firms are having right now because I'm not in Toronto for the summer?

Is your question whether you can get an OCI job without attending? Or whether attending could theoretically have benefits you’ll miss?

Yes, to both.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would it be impolitic to email a partner at a large firm firm and ask for a phone call to discuss their practice? I've gotten into contact with a number of associates this way but obviously partners are on another level entirely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/11/2019 at 2:27 PM, harveyspecter993 said:

Would it be impolitic to email a partner at a large firm firm and ask for a phone call to discuss their practice? I've gotten into contact with a number of associates this way but obviously partners are on another level entirely.

Depends on the partner but I wouldn’t do it. Presuming you’re a student, as am I, what advice could a partner extend to you that an associate can’t? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/12/2019 at 2:27 AM, harveyspecter993 said:

Would it be impolitic to email a partner at a large firm firm and ask for a phone call to discuss their practice? I've gotten into contact with a number of associates this way but obviously partners are on another level entirely.

Reach out to the recruitment person at the firm and ask if there might be an opportunity to meet or speak with the person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, theycancallyouhoju said:

Reach out to the recruitment person at the firm and ask if there might be an opportunity to meet or speak with the person.

 

16 hours ago, FingersCr0ssed said:

Depends on the partner but I wouldn’t do it. Presuming you’re a student, as am I, what advice could a partner extend to you that an associate can’t? 

What if the recruitment person is also a partner? This happens to be the case in two specific firms I am highly interested in. Both partners seem really busy so I am trying to proceed with caution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As was mentioned above, what do you think being in touch with the partner is going to do for you that being in touch with an associate will not?  If you think it's going to provide you with some sort of advantage in recruitment,  it will not. Questions about practice areas can be answered by an associate.  I would not recommend contacting a partner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

As was mentioned above, what do you think being in touch with the partner is going to do for you that being in touch with an associate will not?  If you think it's going to provide you with some sort of advantage in recruitment,  it will not. Questions about practice areas can be answered by an associate.  I would not recommend contacting a partner.

Well, primarily just wanted to talk to the recruitment person of both firms, either via phone or send questions through email, because both websites are fairly blank. But since I noticed the recruitment person is a partner, it makes me inclined to just contact an articling student or a first year associate. Personally, for me I would prefer to go to a non-partner, or someone who is closest to me in terms of graduation date...

But at the same time, I am confused as to why they would list the key recruitment contact as a (seemingly busy) partner. These are fairly small boutiques so that might provide more context.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, erinl2 said:

As was mentioned above, what do you think being in touch with the partner is going to do for you that being in touch with an associate will not?  If you think it's going to provide you with some sort of advantage in recruitment,  it will not. Questions about practice areas can be answered by an associate.  I would not recommend contacting a partner.

Would it not be advantageous if you managed to impress the partner over coffee? I admit that it would be pretty hard for a law student to impress a partner but at the very least if you clicked with them over conversation then would that give you a powerful advocate on the inside?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Would it not be advantageous if you managed to impress the partner over coffee? I admit that it would be pretty hard for a law student to impress a partner but at the very least if you clicked with them over conversation then would that give you a powerful advocate on the inside?

If you can convince someone to become your powerful advocate on the inside by chatting over a cup of coffee, then I must insist you share your secrets. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

If you can convince someone to become your powerful advocate on the inside by chatting over a cup of coffee, then I must insist you share your secrets. 

I meant having someone with power at the firm not someone to advocate powerfully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Would it not be advantageous if you managed to impress the partner over coffee? I admit that it would be pretty hard for a law student to impress a partner but at the very least if you clicked with them over conversation then would that give you a powerful advocate on the inside?

Yeah, this is so unlikely to happen that it isn't worth pursuing. How would you even know if this particular partner was involved on the hiring committee?  The people who actually interview you in the recruitment process are the ones you have to impress. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • Yes. There is a 'tryout' process, or at least there was (new) last year, but it is very easy. We had to read a journal article, answer some questions about it, and perform some citations work pursuant to the McGill Guide (legal citation guide) within a couple of days. It actually takes longer than you might think, but not long. Around 45 people made it on to law review, they wouldn't tell us how many 'tried out'. 
    • So you’re saying you didn’t work your ass off to get into university, maintain a high GPA, pass the LSAT, get into law school, maintain good grades in law school, kill articling interviews, work yourself to the grindstone during articling, pass the bar, and now you’re where you are? this whole “white privilege” discussion is total bullshit and nonsense. I don’t understand the guilt people have for being successful. And you shouldn’t be guilty for your parents having worked that hard to provide a good life for you as I’m sure you will for your kids. 
    • Maybe in some positions, but definitely not in others, including mine.  Unless I have court, I schedule whatever I want and do whatever I please. As long as the hours are there, no one cares. 
    • Work. I love having a schedule that I cannot miss for any reason and getting paid to adhere to it and work on practical, real-life matters. I love having that sense of direction too, as well as just knowing that no matter how small the task I'm working on is, it is still meaningful. I learn a lot more too and retain it far better. I want to wake up in the morning and get started on my day, whereas when I'm in school I constantly yearn for the weekend. I feel a lot more anxiety in school... I get a bit of anxiety at work too, but I think the stability and meaningfulness make it a lot easier to deal with. Getting paid and not having to worry about how I am going to pay the bills is also an added bonus, but I would probably prefer school if it was structurally more similar to a work environment and things were taught in a more hands-on, practical matter.
    • We did actually get an email from the Parkdale intensive back in March, i.e. after the clinic recruit, informing students that they still had unfilled spots so I actually got the sense that it wasn't a very popular clinic, for whatever reason. 
×
×
  • Create New...