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typicalmovie

McGill University vs. University of Manitoba

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I couldn't find this topic/comparison in the forum, but please correct me if I'm wrong.

As the title implies, I'm hoping to get a good comparison between McGill and University of Manitoba going.

Edited by typicalmovie
corrected mistake

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I should also add that I'm especially hoping to hear how likely graduates from each program are to find employment in other provinces (or countries?)

Edited by typicalmovie
lots of reasons

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As the title implies, I'm hoping to get a good comparison between McGill and University of Manitoba going. But I'm really hoping to get input regarding how to best decide which program would work best for me.

I have seen posts like this in the past so I'm really hoping it's not out of line to provide the following details and ask for the opinions of those more experienced than I when it comes to law school and the opportunities that specific programs can provide. Because at this point I don't know what factors to even consider any more when considering my offer of admission to McGill.

How did you folks decide which program to attend? And if you're willing to read random details specific to my life, what factors would you weigh when trying to decide which program to attend?

Edited by typicalmovie
Accidentally posted before i was finished

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7 hours ago, typicalmovie said:

As the title implies, I'm hoping to get a good comparison between McGill and University of Manitoba going. But I'm really hoping to get input regarding how to best decide which program would work best for me.

I have seen posts like this in the past so I'm really hoping it's not out of line to provide the following details and ask for the opinions of those more experienced than I when it comes to law school and the opportunities that specific programs can provide. Because at this point I don't know what factors to even consider any more when considering my offer of admission to McGill.

How did you folks decide which program to attend? And if you're willing to read random details specific to my life, what factors would you weigh when trying to decide which program to attend?

Why are you cross-comparing McGill and Manitoba?  There's no one right answer for everyone - each school offers something different.

Where do you currently live?  Where do you want to work once you graduate?  Do you speak French?

You mentioned going international.  For what it's worth Manitoba will have little to no international recognition, while McGill does have some (though all Canadian schools pale compared to the Harvard/Yale or Oxbridge).  But beyond that I would maybe say Manitoba would have better job prospects in western Canada, while McGill would have better in the remaining parts of Canada.

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McGill seems to do just fine in Vancouver and Calgary from the CDO's numbers, for what it's worth. I have no idea about Manitoba but the reasonable presumption there is to go to Robsen hall.

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1 hour ago, pzabbythesecond said:

McGill seems to do just fine in Vancouver and Calgary from the CDO's numbers, for what it's worth. I have no idea about Manitoba but the reasonable presumption there is to go to Robsen hall.

Robson Hall is indeed the Law School at the U of Manitoba.

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3 minutes ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

Robson Hall is indeed the Law School at the U of Manitoba.

I know. Sorry my wording was unclear - I meant I dont know how McGill grads do in the Manitoba market.

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Also worth noting that if you don't think you will do well on the LSAT, and Mcgill is your dream school, you might have an incentive to not take the test, as Mcgill requires you to disclose your LSAT score regardless of what it is, and a bad LSAT score may keep you from being accepted to Mcgill. I have a number of friends who declined to write the LSAT because they felt they had strong enough applications to get in without it, and Mcgill was their first choice, so they did not want to take the unnecessary risk of writing the test and getting a bad score. Mcgill has accepted you now, it might not accept you after the LSAT if it is bad.

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Speaking anecdotally, it's tough to judge how well U of M students fare overall at finding employment (I assume you mean articles and/or clerking) in other provinces since the vast majority that I know express no interest in leaving. Most students at Robson Hall that I'm aware of aspire to settle in Winnipeg, and tend not to consider work in other provinces. This includes a number of Dean's Lister and students who are clerking or have clerked at the SCC, FC, FCA, TCC, etc. I think, perhaps, it is difficult for many Canadians to believe that many Manitobans live in Manitoba because they are sincerely happy doing so, and not for lack of options. 

I'm any event, most of the students I know who wanted to leave Manitoba found work precisely where they wanted--including me. Several ended up on Bay Street, although most that I am aware of went to full-service corporate commercial firms in Alberta. Obviously a few that I know struck out, but this was after being extended interviews on the strengths of their resumes and transcripts. From what I know, maybe 10-15 per cent of my graduating class applied out of province. CDO OCI-receptions for Calgary firms, historically, been woefully under-attended. 

Edited by rziegler
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2 hours ago, rziegler said:

I think, perhaps, it is difficult for many Canadians to believe that many Manitobans live in Manitoba because they are sincerely happy doing so, and not for lack of options. 

This sounds pathological and it must be some weird variant of Stockholm syndrome

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3 hours ago, rziegler said:

Speaking anecdotally, it's tough to judge how well U of M students fare overall at finding employment (I assume you mean articles and/or clerking) in other provinces since the vast majority that I know express no interest in leaving. Most students at Robson Hall that I'm aware of aspire to settle in Winnipeg, and tend not to consider work in other provinces. This includes a number of Dean's Lister and students who are clerking or have clerked at the SCC, FC, FCA, TCC, etc. I think, perhaps, it is difficult for many Canadians to believe that many Manitobans live in Manitoba because they are sincerely happy doing so, and not for lack of options. 

I'm any event, most of the students I know who wanted to leave Manitoba found work precisely where they wanted--including me. Several ended up on Bay Street, although most that I am aware of went to full-service corporate commercial firms in Alberta. Obviously a few that I know struck out, but this was after being extended interviews on the strengths of their resumes and transcripts. From what I know, maybe 10-15 per cent of my graduating class applied out of province. CDO OCI-receptions for Calgary firms, historically, been woefully under-attended. 

Someone not taking potshots at Manitoba at every chance? I like you.

A lot of Manitobans tend to stay in Manitoba, I find. As someone who left, I certainly miss some things about life in Manitoba despite everyone around talking up my current city of residence to the high heavens. It's pretty quiet. It's got a lot of nature and space. Costs of living are relatively low. Things are much more relaxed and slow-paced, especially outside of Winnipeg. And honestly as a visible minority I've faced less open prejudice in Manitoba than I have where I'm currently living despite my hometown being white as white bread and my current city of residence being touted for its diversity. Life and a career in Manitoba isn't to everyone's tastes, of course (there's nothing to do except drink and go to hockey games, my friend once joked), but it's not a blighted hellscape either.

(sorry for the rant about Manitoba, hopefully OP gets at least some useful information out of it haha)

Edited by Xer

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Do you have family ties/responsibilities that keep you in Manitoba? A partner that would be moving with you? Or staying back home? What are your goals for a legal education?

I've never understood the comparisons with Mickey Gs. It's the only school with the transsytemic model. That should be the cincher for people interested and the killer to people who aren't. Plus you have the extra semester. And no clinical experiences due to limitations imposed by the Barreau. 

So, if your only really attractiveness to McGill is the lack of lsat, coming from someone that applied for that reason, it left McGill fairly unfulfilling. 

 

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Without having any context whatsoever: you should go to McGill. But context is everything.

The two most important questions from my point of view: Where do you want to work when you're done? What is the relative cost of each school?
 

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