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Hi, 

I'm looking for some insight about transferring to UBC. I've already sent in an application and would love to hear from successful transfer students with regard to your stats (GPA, LSAT), extracurriculars, and the compassionate grounds for application. I'd especially like to know what type of compassionate grounds are usually in favor of admission as a transfer student. 

Thanks! 

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I have no information for you.  I'm just here to tell you I like your name.

I can't remember for sure, but I think @Mal or @Another Hutz may have had experience with transfers to UBC.

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My understanding of the process is that compassionate grounds is a fairly low bar, it is really difficult for them to weigh compassion. Personally, I was homesick and wanted to be closer to family. 

I was also previously accepted to UBC and had very good law school grades. From talking with others that I knew at the time and during orientation, most students who were successful transfer applicants were quite strong law students. 

 

 

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I also submitted an application with a B+ avg from UoA (we scale to B- to B) and hoping to get in. I don't have very strong compassionate grounds as it's just that everyone in my family is here. My LSAT score was 154 so that will most likely be why I won't get in. Good luck to you OP. 

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Thanks @Mal and @Alterion for your inputs. I have somewhat of similar stats as Alterion. So fingers crossed we both get in! and Mal, when you say "strong law students" do you mean straight A's, dean's lists etc.? 

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@ClaireL27 Last time I emailed admissions, they said they’re expecting to have the results out by the second half of June. So far, my online application tracker still says “awaiting evaluation”

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Posted (edited)

Yes, it is. Although the last time I spoke with them - about 3 weeks ago - they said they were aiming for the second half of June, but wasn’t a harsh deadline. So I’m expecting that it is very possible that there could be a delay. I know a few students that got accepted into law school off a waitlist in July-August, so I assume admissions are still busy during this time!

Edited by Kittycatmeow777

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Hey all, good luck with your transfers. May I ask if any of you were heavily involved with ECs in your 1L? I feel as if I lacked ECs and it may be a downfall. Also, any consensus on what a "satisfactory" GPA means? I have heard of people getting in with a B avg and some with a B+ to A-.

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Hi @whatislaw, I personally was not heavily involved. I have a couple of things that were mentioned in my personal statement and the reference letters briefly. But I would not say that I was too invovled in ECs. What does your ECs look like? And I am wondering the same thing with the GPA. Good luck to you as well! 

 

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@whatislaw Well people normally say you need at least a B+ average but that is really dependent on what school you went to. For example, UBC scales to B+ so having a B+ is average compared to schools like UoA which can scale to B-. So I would say the GPA requirement is dependent on your law school scaling. Not much we can do right now but pray. 

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Posted (edited)

@whatislaw I have a research-based EC - fairly standard. I don't expect it to be too big of a factor considering UBC doesn't have an allotted section to write EC's or take resumes as a part of the application process - this is just my opinion though. @Alterion That is a good point. I didn't take that into consideration. And I would imagine that in a school that avg B/B-, you would need at least a B/B-, but that may not be considered competitive as per Alterion's point about needing at least a B+ average for UBC's curve.

Also, has anyone contacted admissions at all to see when we can expect the results by? The last time I spoke with them was about 3-weeks ago about the "second half of June". @ClaireL27

Edited by Kittycatmeow777

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Posted (edited)

@whatislaw  I actually just called them and they said the end of the month, but hopefully we'll find out next week! They also said the results will be sent via email and not by phone. 

Edited by Kittycatmeow777

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Posted (edited)

I always hear that you need a B+ average to transfer yet I am uncertain which schools they came from in the first place. I think that being at least 1 grade higher than the average would be required (i.e. School scales to B- so you need at least a B). I doubt they would accept people who are just average unless extenuating circumstances. 

Edited by Alterion
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22 hours ago, Alterion said:

@whatislaw Well people normally say you need at least a B+ average but that is really dependent on what school you went to. For example, UBC scales to B+ so having a B+ is average compared to schools like UoA which can scale to B-. So I would say the GPA requirement is dependent on your law school scaling. Not much we can do right now but pray. 

UBC has a B average.

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