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Womp Womp

Got the e-mail yesterday.

cGPA 3.83/4.33 (including recent semester grades)

LSAT: 155

Strong LORs, paralegal with 6 yrs law firm experience.

Applied as a "special applicant".

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Got email this morning. Special applicant with 2.93 GPA, 167 LSAT, and two years of uni completed with strong Sask connection. 

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2 hours ago, orz said:

Got email this morning. Special applicant with 2.93 GPA, 167 LSAT, and two years of uni completed with strong Sask connection. 

Congrats on the LSAT. Im sure you will have no issues getting in in the next year or two. 

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Got the e-mail this afternoon. 

cGPA: 3.21

L2: 3.61/4.33 OLSAS

LSAT: 137, 142 

BC resident 

Guess I will have to re-take the LSAT in September and re-apply. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Rejected via e-mail.

cGPA: 3.13

L2: 3.7

LSAT: 154

Ontario resident, work experience, MSc and excellent LORs

Edited by throwaway1001

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Rejected via email.

cPGA: 3.4

L2 GPA: 3.93

LSAT: 157

Alberta resident. Little volunteer work or relevant work experience. A little surprised that I didn't get accepted to be honest.

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42 minutes ago, throwaway7878790 said:

Rejected via email.

cPGA: 3.4

L2 GPA: 3.93

LSAT: 157

Alberta resident. Little volunteer work or relevant work experience. A little surprised that I didn't get accepted to be honest.

Most likely because you are not a Sask resident. Your stats are really good! If you boost your lsat by a couple points, I am sure you will have much better luck next year! 

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