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Are you satisfied?

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5 hours ago, tanx said:

Well I’m not going to tell you exactly where to preserve my anonymity, but I work at a senior counsel level for a company in an established industry. I’m pretty sure my salary is on par with similar roles. 

Were you in private practice before or were you always in-house?

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I have now been practicing as a lawyer for 5 years. 

No, I am not satisfied, but it's extremely difficult to complain when I consider the amount of privilege I started with, and still have.  I have had all the opportunity to do better for myself, but I just haven't been able to get where I want to.  

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9 hours ago, utmguy said:

I have now been practicing as a lawyer for 5 years. 

No, I am not satisfied, but it's extremely difficult to complain when I consider the amount of privilege I started with, and still have.  I have had all the opportunity to do better for myself, but I just haven't been able to get where I want to.  

In terms of work-life balance? Or salary? Or both? 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Starling said:

In terms of work-life balance? Or salary? Or both? 

Surprisingly I am content with both work/life balance and salary. 

My issue is moreso just a lack of fulfilling work, and mostly feeling like I'm a dispensable cog in a machine.

Edited by utmguy
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19 hours ago, utmguy said:

I have now been practicing as a lawyer for 5 years. 

No, I am not satisfied, but it's extremely difficult to complain when I consider the amount of privilege I started with, and still have.  I have had all the opportunity to do better for myself, but I just haven't been able to get where I want to.  

How were you/are you “privileged?”

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2 hours ago, Mycousinsteve said:

How were you/are you “privileged?”

My parents paid 100% of my university/law school expenses, and I graduated law school with zero debt.  (Unless you count the mortgage on the house I bought with my future wife during law school.)

I now work as an associate at a major firm earning a healthy six figure salary, with tons of opportunity for career growth.  

Aside from the fact that my family accumulated wealth from blue collar union jobs (as opposed to having any family in the legal profession), I'm basically the poster child for white privilege.  

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On 6/25/2019 at 10:21 AM, utmguy said:

My parents paid 100% of my university/law school expenses, and I graduated law school with zero debt.  (Unless you count the mortgage on the house I bought with my future wife during law school.)

I now work as an associate at a major firm earning a healthy six figure salary, with tons of opportunity for career growth.  

Aside from the fact that my family accumulated wealth from blue collar union jobs (as opposed to having any family in the legal profession), I'm basically the poster child for white privilege.  

 

On 6/25/2019 at 10:21 AM, utmguy said:

My parents paid 100% of my university/law school expenses, and I graduated law school with zero debt.  (Unless you count the mortgage on the house I bought with my future wife during law school.)

I now work as an associate at a major firm earning a healthy six figure salary, with tons of opportunity for career growth.  

Aside from the fact that my family accumulated wealth from blue collar union jobs (as opposed to having any family in the legal profession), I'm basically the poster child for white privilege.  

So you’re saying you didn’t work your ass off to get into university, maintain a high GPA, pass the LSAT, get into law school, maintain good grades in law school, kill articling interviews, work yourself to the grindstone during articling, pass the bar, and now you’re where you are?

this whole “white privilege” discussion is total bullshit and nonsense. I don’t understand the guilt people have for being successful. And you shouldn’t be guilty for your parents having worked that hard to provide a good life for you as I’m sure you will for your kids. 

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22 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

 

So you’re saying you didn’t work your ass off to get into university, maintain a high GPA, pass the LSAT, get into law school, maintain good grades in law school, kill articling interviews, work yourself to the grindstone during articling, pass the bar, and now you’re where you are?

this whole “white privilege” discussion is total bullshit and nonsense. I don’t understand the guilt people have for being successful. And you shouldn’t be guilty for your parents having worked that hard to provide a good life for you as I’m sure you will for your kids. 

I have a strong suspicion that this comment is going to derail this thread. 😃

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22 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

 

So you’re saying you didn’t work your ass off to get into university, maintain a high GPA, pass the LSAT, get into law school, maintain good grades in law school, kill articling interviews, work yourself to the grindstone during articling, pass the bar, and now you’re where you are?

this whole “white privilege” discussion is total bullshit and nonsense. I don’t understand the guilt people have for being successful. And you shouldn’t be guilty for your parents having worked that hard to provide a good life for you as I’m sure you will for your kids. 

You have a deep misunderstanding of how relative advantages factor into where you end up in life.

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19 minutes ago, Diplock said:

Some people may tell you, at times, that you should regularly acknowledge your privilege when you have it. I'm not one of them. What you choose to acknowledge, or not, if your business, and people who shove your face in it at inopportune times are assholes. 

However, if someone else chooses to acknowledge their privilege, and you are triggered simply by hearing that, then you have become the asshole in the exchange. Big time. 

I'm not even going to refute your ignorance. I'll choose another time and place. You don't need to agree with every commonplace fact to function as a lawyer - and yes, the existence and nature of "privilege" if not its absolute contours is a commonly acknowledged fact - but you do need to be able to hear things you don't agree with without completely losing control of your sense of the appropriate. You're responding to an off-hand comment, and objecting simply to hearing someone else offer perspective on their own life. Right, wrong, or otherwise, someone else's perspective on their own life is none of your fucking business - even if they were wrong and you're right. Neither of which are true here, btw. 

Grow the fuck up. 

Notice how you’re the one who called me an asshole, that I need to “grow the fuck up” and that I’m ignorant for disagreeing with the position of another? I think you’re the one who needs to grow up and learn to respect the opinions of others. 

My concern with OP is that in general, it’s very fashionable in today’s day and age or overt political correctness to go on about privilege or “white privilege” when in fact that person had to roll up their sleeves big time to get to their position in life. 

I would agree if it was the 20s and 30s, a time when If you were a woman, person of colour, Jewish, or other type of minority, it would have been very difficult to be accepted into university, much less find a position at a prominent law firm which provided a meaningful salary and career path. Then surely having a family connection or being white or having financial means would be an advantage

But it’s 2019 - as long as you work hard, your race or ethnicity or whatever is no longer relevant to your success. 

In terms of being debt free, sure that’s awesome to have a family to support you. But there’s also private and government backed loans so it’s not as if universities have become a place of higher education exclusive to the wealthy. Anyone and everyone can go if you work hard. But to be ashamed that someone has a family who helped them? That’s inspiring and I’m sure we’d all want to do the same for our kids.

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14 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

Notice how you’re the one who called me an asshole, that I need to “grow the fuck up” and that I’m ignorant for disagreeing with the position of another? I think you’re the one who needs to grow up and learn to respect the opinions of others. 

My concern with OP is that in general, it’s very fashionable in today’s day and age or overt political correctness to go on about privilege or “white privilege” when in fact that person had to roll up their sleeves big time to get to their position in life. 

He thought you were ignorant because you were trying to deny a basic fact of life, not because you disagreed with someone.

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19 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

But it’s 2019 - as long as you work hard, your race or ethnicity or whatever is no longer relevant to your success. 

In terms of being debt free, sure that’s awesome to have a family to support you. But there’s also private and government backed loans so it’s not as if universities have become a place of higher education exclusive to the wealthy. Anyone and everyone can go if you work hard. But to be ashamed that someone has a family who helped them? That’s inspiring and I’m sure we’d all want to do the same for our kids.

wow. just wow. i am having indigestion reading this. 

 

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As a new call, I found the original purpose of this thread very insightful. I hope  it isn't closed and people continue to post responses about their legal careers and whether or not they are satisfied and why.

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Let's all stop feeding the trolls. 💁‍♀️

Back to the point of this thread. 

I am getting increasingly frustrated by not being able to move up in my current position - there is nowhere for me to go within the organization except to be my boss. Pay is good, work-life balance is (normally okay).

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8 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

Notice how you’re the one who called me an asshole, that I need to “grow the fuck up” and that I’m ignorant for disagreeing with the position of another? I think you’re the one who needs to grow up and learn to respect the opinions of others. 

My concern with OP is that in general, it’s very fashionable in today’s day and age or overt political correctness to go on about privilege or “white privilege” when in fact that person had to roll up their sleeves big time to get to their position in life. 

I would agree if it was the 20s and 30s, a time when If you were a woman, person of colour, Jewish, or other type of minority, it would have been very difficult to be accepted into university, much less find a position at a prominent law firm which provided a meaningful salary and career path. Then surely having a family connection or being white or having financial means would be an advantage

But it’s 2019 - as long as you work hard, your race or ethnicity or whatever is no longer relevant to your success. 

In terms of being debt free, sure that’s awesome to have a family to support you. But there’s also private and government backed loans so it’s not as if universities have become a place of higher education exclusive to the wealthy. Anyone and everyone can go if you work hard. But to be ashamed that someone has a family who helped them? That’s inspiring and I’m sure we’d all want to do the same for our kids.

[emphasis added]

Re the asshole comment, @Diplock used an "if...then" construction. Your construing the hypothetical statement as your having been called an asshole, constitutes an admission that his conditional accusation was true. :twisted:

In what way was @utmguy expressing shame? They were acknowledging that they had some advantages compared to others. If you think that's shameful, that speaks more of your defensiveness and reading too much into things.

TL;DR: stop reading now.

I read very quickly and that was a huge advantage for the LSAT and in law school, and I enjoyed doing logic puzzles since I was in elementary school which gave me a huge advantage on the LSAT since I'd spent years doing problems, and I'm a US citizen which is a huge advantage when travelling to the US, and I was fortunate enough to have strong family financial support in university including law school. I'm not ashamed of any of those things; but neither am I proud of them, because they're not accomplishments. They just are.

By contrast, I also spent, not a lot of time (two months), but concentrated time (up to 16 hours a day studying) preparing for the New York bar. So I feel some sense of accomplishment for that. But I also recognize that I had the luxury to spend two months not working and paying for a course and travelling to NY to write the exam.

Now, reading very quickly is a consequence of having read a huge amount growing up, and speed of doing logic puzzles having done a huge amount (at times, averaging more than one a day, for years, in elementary school at least). So there was time and effort involved in one sense, but I read and did logic puzzles for fun, not work, not preparing for the LSAT or law school, so it would be silly for me to feel like there was any achievement, because there wasn't. If someone, for the purposes of doing well on the LSAT, spent time they found onerous and unpleasant, working on questions to improve their score, then they may rightly feel a sense of accomplishment, because they worked to get that score. I was just lucky that an enjoyable pastime turned out to be somewhat useful.

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8 minutes ago, Whaleofwallstreet said:

As a new call, I found the original purpose of this thread very insightful. I hope  it isn't closed and people continue to post responses about their legal careers and whether or not they are satisfied and why.

I only practice law (very) part-time, and I have to deal with a law society spot audit (which is annoying, considering I don't receive funds in trust and have few clients), so you're not catching me at my best. But, despite working full-time in another field, I am satisfied professionally, I wouldn't be in the field I am if I hadn't pursued law, so it's all worked out.

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