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Hi! I was hoping some Osgoode students and alumni could enlighten me a bit regarding clinics and ECs :)

I am a 0L beginning in August and definitely want to get involved in clinics/ECs. The information regarding  many of them isn't very extensive on the website. 

I'm particularly interested in Parkdale, CLASP, the Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic, the Innocence Project, the Criminal Law intensive, and the International & Transnational Law intensive. I know they can be competitive, so I'm trying to remain open to any options that relate to my personal passions/interests.

If anyone was involved in any of these (or are very familiar with them), I'm hoping they might be able to speak to structure (i.e., are these weekly, like a class, or do you spend a whole semester), credit/grading, the experience in general (was it positive? helpful?), and anything else that seems worth mentioning! 

Thank you!!!

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This is a good starting point:

(remember- there might be changes to these next year). As you can see, the structures are very different for each program. Some only last for a semester while others last for the whole school year. Credits also vary. Normally, you can only do one intensive program (15 credits; equivalent to a semester) during your time at Osgoode. (But you can add on another program worth less than 15 credits in a different year). Don't worry if this doesn't make sense- there are information sessions to help explain the application process.

You apply to intensives and other programs in the second semester of 1L to enroll for the following year. So you don't have to worry about these just yet :).  Of course, the more related experience you have when you apply to the competitive programs, the better your chances.

 

When you start 1L, you'll get emails about applying as a volunteer to a variety of different initiatives. Some of the applications  (e.g. CLASP 1L Caseworker) are due early so make sure you keep track of deadlines. I can't really speak to experiences in these programs but there are multiple opportunities to speak to upper-year students. You'll get a chance to speak to students that are part of some of these groups BEFORE you apply as to volunteer in 1L (so you can ask your questions in-person). Everyone seems to really like the practical experiences provided by volunteering or being a part of a clinic/intensive program.

For example, last year there were many events where we got to talk to current CLASP, PCLS, PBSC, etc. students very early in the semester (before volunteer applications were due). There is  also a clinic/intensive fair each semester.

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Besides CLASP, you can only do the other clinics in 2L and 3L so you have lots of time. Some are more competitive than others like Parkdale and CLASP, but since there are so many options, you should be able to land something. 

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17 hours ago, retakelsat said:

This is a good starting point:

(remember- there might be changes to these next year). As you can see, the structures are very different for each program. Some only last for a semester while others last for the whole school year. Credits also vary. Normally, you can only do one intensive program (15 credits; equivalent to a semester) during your time at Osgoode. (But you can add on another program worth less than 15 credits in a different year). Don't worry if this doesn't make sense- there are information sessions to help explain the application process.

You apply to intensives and other programs in the second semester of 1L to enroll for the following year. So you don't have to worry about these just yet :).  Of course, the more related experience you have when you apply to the competitive programs, the better your chances.

 

When you start 1L, you'll get emails about applying as a volunteer to a variety of different initiatives. Some of the applications  (e.g. CLASP 1L Caseworker) are due early so make sure you keep track of deadlines. I can't really speak to experiences in these programs but there are multiple opportunities to speak to upper-year students. You'll get a chance to speak to students that are part of some of these groups BEFORE you apply as to volunteer in 1L (so you can ask your questions in-person). Everyone seems to really like the practical experiences provided by volunteering or being a part of a clinic/intensive program.

For example, last year there were many events where we got to talk to current CLASP, PCLS, PBSC, etc. students very early in the semester (before volunteer applications were due). There is  also a clinic/intensive fair each semester.

I just want to clarify ... so I could potentially volunteer for one of said programs prior to doing an actual clinic or intensive? :) Can you volunteer in 1L?

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Also one more question haha.. for the full-year 15 credit intensives, do you take classes as well or are you exclusively taking the intensive?

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4 hours ago, vanhopeful95 said:

I just want to clarify ... so I could potentially volunteer for one of said programs prior to doing an actual clinic or intensive? :) Can you volunteer in 1L?

The CLASP intensive you do in 2L or 3L and you're a division leader. However, CLASP invites 1Ls to apply to be caseworkers. You basically report to a division leader and do whatever they tell you to do. I'm not sure about any of the other ones you mentioned.

3 hours ago, vanhopeful95 said:

Also one more question haha.. for the full-year 15 credit intensives, do you take classes as well or are you exclusively taking the intensive?

You still take classes. Instead of a full course load, which is 4-5 courses a semester, you'd take about 2 per semester.

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