Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Yas081958

How to start the process for getting into law school ?

Recommended Posts


I've always been interested in going to law school but only now have gotten the courage to start the process. 

I have several different obstacles to getting there. First their is no possibility of me getting strong reference letters for my undergraduates studies. I made no connections with any of my professor to allow me to get a strong reference letter. I was thinking of getting a certification from york in public administration and law this year. This would allow me to to gain some academic connections to get reference letters. 

In addition what kind of Ec should I try to get. I have basically no volunteer experience. I currently work for the provincial government, part of my job is having to consult with lawyers often and enforce court orders. Though i do not know if this will count. 

I am just looking for how to fix my situation and get myself competitive for law school. I have not taken the lsat yet, but have started studying and hoping to take it later this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) You only need one professional reference. The other can be personal (for Ontario). If you are a mature student, you can be exempt from a professional reference, depending on the law school. Personally, doing another program for your reasons is a waste of money.  

2) You can get into law school with virtually no volunteer experience. 

3) Do well on the LSAT. The 2007 official LSAT prep-test has been released and can be found online for free, if you did not know this already. 

You're on the right path. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah you are actually looking at Law School Admissions from the wrong perspective. To get into Med School strong EC’s and references are needed. But for Law School these things are either only of minor importance or not important at all. There are a few Law Schools that take a holistic approach (look at work experience, EC’s and references alongside GPA and LSAT). But a lot of Law Schools (possibly even most of them) essentially admit using an index (usually 50/50 weighting) of your undergrad GPA and your LSAT score. 

Edited by Johnappleseed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2019 at 4:31 PM, Yas081958 said:


I've always been interested in going to law school but only now have gotten the courage to start the process. 

I have several different obstacles to getting there. First their is no possibility of me getting strong reference letters for my undergraduates studies. I made no connections with any of my professor to allow me to get a strong reference letter. I was thinking of getting a certification from york in public administration and law this year. This would allow me to to gain some academic connections to get reference letters. 

In addition what kind of Ec should I try to get. I have basically no volunteer experience. I currently work for the provincial government, part of my job is having to consult with lawyers often and enforce court orders. Though i do not know if this will count. 

I am just looking for how to fix my situation and get myself competitive for law school. I have not taken the lsat yet, but have started studying and hoping to take it later this year.

For some schools (uvic, u of a, sask) possibly more, they dont even ask for reference letters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Yas081958 said:

What Lsat score should i aim for to competitive for law schools ?

You should aim for the highest score possible. No one can tell you what score you need for admission.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Yas081958 said:

What Lsat score should i aim for to competitive for law schools ?

Depends on your CGPA and L2/B2/B3 GPA and the law schools you plan to apply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, AJD19 said:

For some schools (uvic, u of a, sask) possibly more, they dont even ask for reference letters.

Not required for UNB, UBC or Manitoba either. AFAIK, the schools (outside of Ontario schools that all require them) that require reference letters are UofC, Dal and TRU. 

Also, I'm not sure how much weight reference letters even have... I don't know how bad of a situation you were in with your undergraduate program, but I'm sure you could think of 1 professor that at least knows who you are and can write something...

If you're going back to school for the sole purpose of making a connection with a prof for a reference then you're making the wrong choice. Take that time to do well on the LSAT, and take a diagnostic immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

Not required for UNB, UBC or Manitoba either. AFAIK, the schools (outside of Ontario schools that all require them) that require reference letters are UofC, Dal and TRU. 

Also, I'm not sure how much weight reference letters even have... I don't know how bad of a situation you were in with your undergraduate program, but I'm sure you could think of 1 professor that at least knows who you are and can write something...

If you're going back to school for the sole purpose of making a connection with a prof for a reference then you're making the wrong choice. Take that time to do well on the LSAT, and take a diagnostic immediately.

I know of one professor who may write me a reference letter. I do agree that going back to school for only a reference will a waste of money if it does not have much weight in the admission process. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Yas081958 said:

I know of one professor who may write me a reference letter. I do agree that going back to school for only a reference will a waste of money if it does not have much weight in the admission process. 

Try approaching that professor. I think many people overestimate how involved with the professor's class they need to be to get a good reference letter. Pick a professor whose class you got an outstanding grade in (and whom you've ideally taken more than one course with) and ask them. I have a friend who is a lecturer in Sociology and she writes these all the time for students even if they've only spoken to her a few times the entire semester. The worst they can do is say no. I doubt a faculty member would say yes and intentionally write a bad reference letter. If you've been out of school for awhile it would be a good idea to meet with the professor and discuss what you've been doing with your life since you were a student and to submit your current CV.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, IrishStew said:

Not required for UNB, UBC or Manitoba either. AFAIK, the schools (outside of Ontario schools that all require them) that require reference letters are UofC, Dal and TRU. 

 

Unless something has changed recently, U of T does not require LORs, and hasn't for as long as I can remember.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that at this point you should:

1. Calculate your cGPA / L2 GPA / B3 GPA

2. Take a diagnostic LSAT

3. Come back to this forum and post these in a “chances” post

from there, people will be able to recommend which schools you have a good shot at, where to apply, and what you should focus on improving to have the best chance of admission somewhere.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • There is significant variation across the province. I'm not clear on what happened elsewhere, but my understanding is that all Ontario university law programs were online in some way this fall. Do correct me if I'm wrong. I'm 1L at Osgoode, it was fully online for me. Upper year students there were clinical and intensives that had an in-person component and the criminal trial advocacy program ran in person for at least part of the fall. For 1L there was a two week intensive in August-September that offered optional in-person attendance for a few students for a couple sessions while the rest of us were on Zoom.  After what happened this fall at some universities where they started in person and then had to move online, I think administrators will be a little more reluctant from the beginning to start with in-person when they know from their experience this year that it was not possible to follow that plan.  From a public health perspective, medical leaders want universities to stay remote as much as possible. Osgoode and Ryerson are both embeded in neighbourhoods where people experience significant marginalization and limited access to health care and have extremely high rates of Covid. Bringing thousands of students into those neighbourhoods is irresponsible. At U of T the risk is not as significant for the immediate neighbourhood but it is for the region as a whole. Our vaccine roll-out is not proceeding quickly enough to ensure vaccination rates will be high enough by September, and keep in mind that decision has to be made much earlier and it's easier to stick with the status quo than it is to change. This past academic year, the decision to be online for fall was made by middle of July at Osgoode, and by August, we knew winter would be online. My best case scenario prediction is that fall will be fully online, or as fully as it was this past year, and by winter, some universities will have in-person as an option but the option to stay remote will have to remain available for equity reasons.  
    • Thanks for the advice/input everyone! I feel like I'll have to mull this over for a while, but I feel like I'm leaning towards staying on the team. My coaches are quite supportive so if I can't handle the time commitment I'll have some flexibility. 
    • I emailed because im also "complete" but haven't heard back!
    • I know two people who ran Varsity during law school. They were fine athletes, but not the top of their game. No idea how they performed in law school. 
    • Im having the exact same issue! Did you end up emailing anyone or figuring it out?

×
×
  • Create New...