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Windsor Dual vs. Bora Laskin (Lakehead)

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Some context - I am interested in practicing as close to Toronto as possible. I don’t really have an interest in practicing in the US. I am still waiting to hear back from other Canadian schools, but posing his question as I do have to provisionally accept one. 

Both programs have their benefits and downsides, but I am interested in hearing your thoughts (especially recent grads). 

Thanks!

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If you have no interest in working in the US, the dual degree isn’t worth it. Even if you were, I’m not sure that it’s worth the substantial extra cost.

Provisionally accept Lakehead.

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29 minutes ago, TobyFlenderson said:

If you have no interest in working in the US, the dual degree isn’t worth it. Even if you were, I’m not sure that it’s worth the substantial extra cost.

Provisionally accept Lakehead.

Wouldn’t it be more difficult to land a job closer to Toronto as a Lakehead grad? 

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It's not just getting the job. It's also about the debt. 

If you don't have to worry about the debt, then it may be worth it to go the windsor dual route. I've seen a number of their students working in Toronto, big law or otherwise. Obviously you face an uphill battle, but that's true with Bora Laskin too.

If you are paying your own way, it shouldn't be a question. What's the point of a 70-80k job in Toronto as an associate if you're making debt payments on a 200 000 dollar loan, alongside 1500 in rent, and all the other living costs? You won't be able to afford to work in Toronto with that much debt. Unless you want and get big law, which are both difficult propositions.

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1 hour ago, Deadpool said:

And you think it's easier to land a job in Toronto as a Windsor dual?

Landing a job in Toronto will be difficult for grads of both programs. Landing a job closer to Toronto I figure would be easier as a Dual grad as BL gears it’s grads to practice in Northern ON. 

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9 hours ago, lawstories said:

Landing a job in Toronto will be difficult for grads of both programs. Landing a job closer to Toronto I figure would be easier as a Dual grad as BL gears it’s grads to practice in Northern ON. 

That seems to be their sales pitch, but keep in mind that it doesn't limit you to Northern Ontario. I know many Lakehead grads working in Toronto.

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it's not only financially cheaper but also 10 month article free. 

winsdor dual , you take more American courses, than Canadian legal courses. If you have no intention of going to America, maybe you shall try Lakehead. . Lakehead may help you better prepared for bar  But it fully dedicated to Canadian law. it's not only cheaper but also  article free. ( I know course selection is slightly limited )

http://csdc.lakeheadu.ca/~/Catalog/ViewCatalog.aspx?pageid=viewcatalog&catalogid=24&topicgroupid=21218

 

Windor dual

The tuition for the incoming class of 2014/2015 is:

U-Windsor $16,055* (CDN) per year
UDM $23,173* (US) per year

Students in the Dual JD Program are required to complete at least 104 credits in three years between the two institutions – 60 credits from Detroit Mercy Law combined with 44 credits from Windsor Law.

Edited by akulamasusu
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BI have graduated from the lakehead program, so take that for what you will. I have a job in the GTA (I just simply didn’t want to be in toronto), and most people I know who wanted to be in Toronto got jobs there, and even on Bay Street In the big firms. Obviously; our networking is more geared to northern Ontario, but lakehead offers MANY placements in southern Ontario, including for big firms, small firms, and the government and non profit environmental firms in Toronto. Also, there’s a job set up with BMO and BLG specifically for Bora Laskin students after 1L for the summer. 

 

Also, our tuition is fairly cheap comparatively, rent is MUCH cheaper in Thunder Bay than many places, there are many summer job oppourtunities here and the placement process exempts us from articling (which many of us have taken advantage of to get a leg up on traditional graduates) 

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24 minutes ago, lalaland554 said:

and the placement process exempts us from articling (which many of us have taken advantage of to get a leg up on traditional graduates) 

I don't mean to derail this thread, and Mods please splice if appropriate, but @providence see what I was saying? Some advantage was there to be taken being able to be a full associate as opposed to an articling student. I'm totally unsurprised this is true.

Thanks @lalaland554

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