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LegallyBrunetteNL

Strength of ECs/stats for fall 2020?

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Hi there -- 

Wondering what is considered "strong" as far as ECs go... I've always felt as though I have strong ECs, but I am wondering what you all consider to be so.

I've volunteered with my local Public Legal Information Association, been president of my undergraduate student societies (for both majors), among some other not-for-profit work. I've also worked as a writing tutor at my university, at a couple long-term retail gigs, and have spent summers working for my provincial government and as a tour guide in my local legislative assembly. Further, I have been a panelist and moderator at several on-campus events and have won a few scholarships. 

My GPA is ~3.9/4.0, cumulatively, and I got a 157 on my first LSAT attempt. I am looking to re-write during the July sitting.

What do you think my chances are like? Are these "strong" ECs? Where should I be applying, based on my stats? 

Thanks a million. Cheers!

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From https://lawapplicants.ca/faq#ecs
 
Quote

 

What are considered "strong" extra-curriculars?

Law students are typically active, "type-A" individuals and, as a result, are involved in many extra-curriculars that afford them the opportunity to use and improve their skills. This means that most law school applicants have substantial extra-curricular repertoires, making the baseline for "strong" extra-curriculars much higher. Typical extra-curriculars of law students include: club executive; member of a student union/council board or committee; member of a university committee or the university senate; writer for a university newspaper; intramural or varsity sports; and volunteering with local, provincial, or national organizations. Anything beyond this may be considered a "strong" extra-curricular, but bear in mind that deciding whether an extra-curricular is strong is highly subjective and therefore would be difficult to measure with any certainty. The best bet is to focus on doing what you enjoy, rather than attempting to build a resume tailored to "impress" an admissions committee member.

 

 

If you can get your LSAT up to 165+ I expect your application will be competitive at all the Canadian schools

 

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18 minutes ago, LegallyBrunetteNL said:

Hi there -- 

Wondering what is considered "strong" as far as ECs go... I've always felt as though I have strong ECs, but I am wondering what you all consider to be so.

I've volunteered with my local Public Legal Information Association, been president of my undergraduate student societies (for both majors), among some other not-for-profit work. I've also worked as a writing tutor at my university, at a couple long-term retail gigs, and have spent summers working for my provincial government and as a tour guide in my local legislative assembly. Further, I have been a panelist and moderator at several on-campus events and have won a few scholarships. 

My GPA is ~3.9/4.0, cumulatively, and I got a 157 on my first LSAT attempt. I am looking to re-write during the July sitting.

What do you think my chances are like? Are these "strong" ECs? Where should I be applying, based on my stats? 

Thanks a million. Cheers!

I think these are amazing EC's. Now that might not mean anything from a mere applicant, but these don't sound "average" to me. To be average would mean a majority of law school applicants are doing all of what you've done. I get the feeling that isn't the case. Certainly not the case for me! I don't have groundbreaking EC's and below average stats and I got an offer from TRU :) If my LSAT was higher, I imagine I would've got accepted to at least a couple more schools that I applied to. 

I would suggest seeing if you can get your LSAT at 160 or over. That might just put you in a comfortable position. 

Apply to Ottawa, TRU, Western, Lakehead, Windsor, Osgoode. (among others!)

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Posted (edited)

Those are strong stats. If you can get your LSAT in the low or mid 160's I think you have a great shot at any law school in Canada

 

Edited by Aschenbach
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It's really difficult to quantify the impact that your ECs will have on your chances, but I think you can feel confident that they won't hold your application back. If you can get a 160+ on your LSAT retake, you should have an excellent cycle. 

 

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Whether or not ECs matter at all depends on where you're applying - some schools are pure numbers, some schools pay a personal statement lip service, some schools focus in detail on exactly what you've done with your life. 

 

Your GPA is great, and the scholarships also speak to that. Your LSAT could be better. Those are the two components that will certainly be considered by every school. 

 

Your extra curricular activities in undergrad sound.... fine? Bearing in mind that some schools won't care about them at all, a typical admitted year in a law school will contain many people who have been researchers for MLAs/MPs (not just tour guides) or even been elected themselves (particularly at Municipal level), set up and run their own businesses, achieved great grades while applying for refugee status, been national or olympic level athletes, so on and so forth. Some, but not all of those, would be considered to have 'strong' ECs. There's nothing wrong with what you've done, nobody's going to say "3.9 but didn't win a Nobel? Nahh" - but people often seem to underestimate how accomplished their classmates are. You likely want to focus more on the numbers - particularly as with that GPA, your LSAT is likely the only thing holding you back from the school of your choice (and even with a 157 you should have multiple options).

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, TheLegendof said:

I believe those are average ECs. "Average" isn't bad, just average. 

I don't think those EC's are "average" according to the average applicant. Those are certainly stronger than the average applicant. Even among admitted students here at Western, that would probably be better than average.

That being said OP, try to bump up the LSAT by even a few points and you'll be competitive at many schools. ECs are a minute consideration in comparison to your LSAT/GPA.

Edited by georgecostanzajr

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On 4/24/2019 at 2:40 PM, LegallyBrunetteNL said:

Hi there -- 

Wondering what is considered "strong" as far as ECs go... I've always felt as though I have strong ECs, but I am wondering what you all consider to be so. 

I've volunteered with my local Public Legal Information Association, been president of my undergraduate student societies (for both majors), among some other not-for-profit work. I've also worked as a writing tutor at my university, at a couple long-term retail gigs, and have spent summers working for my provincial government and as a tour guide in my local legislative assembly. Further, I have been a panelist and moderator at several on-campus events and have won a few scholarships.  

My GPA is ~3.9/4.0, cumulatively, and I got a 157 on my first LSAT attempt. I am looking to re-write during the July sitting.

What do you think my chances are like? Are these "strong" ECs? Where should I be applying, based on my stats? 

Thanks a million. Cheers!

I've a 3.92 and 157 and have gotten into Ottawa and Osgoode so far.

I have a solid work history but you definitely have me beat with volunteering/student roles. I had no student roles/clubs, so I'd say you're slightly above average in EC's. I hinged my entire personal statement on one job (more or less), you could easily do the same if you're passionate about any one of your EC's.

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