Jump to content
anonymous0

UVIC vs. UofC Advice

Recommended Posts

Hi y'all, hoping to get some advice!  I have been fortunate enough to be accepted into both UVIC and UCalgary law schools this September, and I am having trouble deciding between the two!  My ultimate goal is to practice in BC, but it is less expensive to live in Calgary, I have more friends in Calgary than Victoria, and my partner would get a raise and promotion if we moved to Calgary.  I did my undergrad at UVIC and really enjoyed it,  and I have heard that it is best to go to school where you want to practice so if there's anyone on here that has been to either school or has any advice to give, I would be happy to hear it! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had to make the same decision last year!

I chose the UofC and I love it (except during the snow months, makes me regret not going to uvic). The community here is really supportive, which was not what I was expecting coming into law school. The environment is very collaborative, and I really mean that. I had a girl who sent me her entire framework a week ago for the final exam. It is best to go where you want to practice, however, as I find networking could be a problem; but students at UofC who really wanted to go back to BC definitely made it possible by putting in more effort. If you want more details, feel free to DM me!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you!  That definitely helps.  I'm just struggling so hard with this decision and any info helps so much!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with what @PoisonApple said. Further, Calgary has one of the best articling placement rates ~96% of students. UoC also has very close ties with the Calgary legal community (2nd biggest legal market in the country), which is a definite advantage over UVIC since students typical have to travel to Vancouver for Big Law interviews. And although it gets cold in the winter months it is one of the sunniest cities in Canada to live in, which i would take over the warmer winters in BC and lots of rain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah that makes sense, but I want to practice in Vancouver after I graduate, so having close ties to the Calgary market doesn't really help me in that regard 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to practice in Vancouver, Victoria beats Calgary - you'd learn local law, and you're closer to the offices, you can do it as a day trip (you wouldn't want to on a daily basis, but). Calgary isn't bad, but Victoria's better for that. As you mention, cost of living might be slightly lower in Calgary, but as I recall tuition is slightly lower in Victoria, so those two might balance. That essentially means you're choosing between your partner's promotion, and the advantages to you of studying in a local school.

 

To be honest, I doubt you can make a truly bad decision in this case. Personally I'd go Victoria, for the career advantages and the weather, but I have no idea about your partner, their job, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as your own career goals are concerned, I think UVic would be best. However, you won't be shutting yourself out of the Vancouver market if you go to Calgary; it will just require more work on your end to wind up there after school.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

@Another Hutzmade solid points in another post that has relevance here.

It's best to go to law school in the same province where you want to work.  This is because laws do differ between provinces, so you generally want to learn the law you'll practice, and it's far easier to obtain articles when living in the city you want to work in.  It's easier to attend events, make connections, etc.

I'm no employer but seeing UVic undergrad + UVic law school is not unusual.  There's a bunch of UBC undergrad + UBC law school resumes out there.  Having a unique educational history may be an interesting topic of conversation or possibly relevant to the work it self, but it's not necessary.  People choose schools for many different reasons, e.g. family, friends, opportunities, having roots, specialization, etc.  

"Mixing it up a bit and trying something new" is all well and good as long as it doesn't make it significantly harder to get to where you want to go.

.

Edited by AJD19
.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I chose the University of Alberta over the University of British Columbia and ended up in Vancouver. It can happen, but you are much better off at UVic if you want Vancouver. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hmm. From what I've heard, both are great schools, and going to Calgary does not bar you from ultimately practicing in BC . I imagine you'll meet a few students in every law school who aren't planning on practicing in the province they're going to school in. Anecdotally speaking, many do just fine. That said, it's generally better to go to a school in the province where you want to practice, with this caveat ... 

It sounds like your partner has zero issues foregoing a potential promotion and raise that would come from moving to Calgary, which sounds a bit odd but I'll roll with it - do correct me if I'm wrong. Since you're more or less indifferent between the two schools, with your main concern being your ability to eventually get back to and practice in BC, then short of simply wanting a change of location there isn't really a reason to choose Calgary over Victoria. If your partner was more invested in the job potential in Calgary then that would tip the scales for me and I would suggest you pick Calgary. Otherwise, the other reasons you listed in my opinion don't displace the general principle that you should go to school where you want to practice.

Sure,  the city is slightly cheaper to live in than Victoria, but whatever you save in rent will likely be burned travelling back and forth looking for positions in BC. And your other friends in Calgary won't be much of a factor since law students by default end up socially ensconced with other law students. It's the nature of the program. It's intense. It's demanding. And the only people who tend to be able to relate in any useful way during this 3 year stretch of our lives are other law students. Our "other friends" typically fade into the background until we're done law school. This isn't an absolute rule, but it happens often enough that it is a well-known trend.

My $0.02 is that Victoria is the simpler choice. Your partner's potential work experience in Calgary might have tilted the decision the other way, but they don't sound invested enough to warrant you taking on the added inconvenience.

Edited by TheAEGIS
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the advice!  I have decided to go to UVIC so I can be better prepared to practice in BC when I graduate.  Thanks all for helping me with my decision!

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • So you’re saying you didn’t work your ass off to get into university, maintain a high GPA, pass the LSAT, get into law school, maintain good grades in law school, kill articling interviews, work yourself to the grindstone during articling, pass the bar, and now you’re where you are? this whole “white privilege” discussion is total bullshit and nonsense. I don’t understand the guilt people have for being successful. And you shouldn’t be guilty for your parents having worked that hard to provide a good life for you as I’m sure you will for your kids. 
    • Maybe in some positions, but definitely not in others, including mine.  Unless I have court, I schedule whatever I want and do whatever I please. As long as the hours are there, no one cares. 
    • Work. I love having a schedule that I cannot miss for any reason and getting paid to adhere to it and work on practical, real-life matters. I love having that sense of direction too, as well as just knowing that no matter how small the task I'm working on is, it is still meaningful. I learn a lot more too and retain it far better. I want to wake up in the morning and get started on my day, whereas when I'm in school I constantly yearn for the weekend. I feel a lot more anxiety in school... I get a bit of anxiety at work too, but I think the stability and meaningfulness make it a lot easier to deal with. Getting paid and not having to worry about how I am going to pay the bills is also an added bonus, but I would probably prefer school if it was structurally more similar to a work environment and things were taught in a more hands-on, practical matter.
    • We did actually get an email from the Parkdale intensive back in March, i.e. after the clinic recruit, informing students that they still had unfilled spots so I actually got the sense that it wasn't a very popular clinic, for whatever reason. 
    • It's a realistic statement. It may seem harsh to those waiting but it would be disingenuous, and dishonest, to instead tell someone the opposite. Most people who are waitlisted, at any school, do not end up receiving an acceptance. It's also a statement that was likely referencing those who have made provisional acceptances at another school and who shouldn't dismiss those in hopes of getting in off a waitlist. 
×
×
  • Create New...