Jump to content
AKJ

Waitlisted 2019

Recommended Posts

20 minutes ago, SpaceLawyer said:

No I haven't, this has to be the shittiest experience I have ever had and I really don't mean to bitch but I literally had both my parents die in my undergrad and I kept a 3.7 CGPA, I did all the extracurricular, got academically recognized, completed a masters and have a 155 LSAT. I frankly don't know what the hell else I can do. 

If that had happened in my life, I have no idea where I’d be, but I can tell you I’d have nowhere near a 3.7 and close to a law school acceptance like you are. This feels like crap and I can empathize to an extent (I have gone through my own share of rough). But be proud of yourself for coming out of it on the other side the way you have.

If you *want* to and have the ability, apply again because I think you will get in. If not, remember that a JD isn’t everything; you know that better than anyone, having faced the adversity you’ve overcome. Best of luck with whatever choice you make. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, MB350 said:

If that had happened in my life, I have no idea where I’d be, but I can tell you I’d have nowhere near a 3.7 and close to a law school acceptance like you are. This feels like crap and I can empathize to an extent (I have gone through my own share of rough). But be proud of yourself for coming out of it on the other side the way you have.

If you *want* to and have the ability, apply again because I think you will get in. If not, remember that a JD isn’t everything; you know that better than anyone, having faced the adversity you’ve overcome. Best of luck with whatever choice you make. 

Honestly, not to be rude but it doesn't matter, a JD isn't everything to a lot of people but it is to me, I didn't care where I got in, I just wanted to practice law.

Be proud of what? I didn't let their deaths define me, it didn't mean anything, I overcame it all and what did it do for me? nothing, I just had the stats that would be necessary for getting into law school and evidently that has done dick all for me. It's been such a slap in the face, I got waitlisted at Ottawa U last year with a lower LSAT and no MA to only be rejected this year with a better one and a masters degree. 

I will be applying again, because frankly, what other choice do I have? it just royally screws everything up because of how old i'll be, the thousand dollars i'll have to respend on applications and the LSAT because evidently 155 wasn't high enough and by the time I start actually practicing I will have absolutely zero time before I have to start making the huge life decisions about families with absolutely zero financing to back it up. 

There's a few U.S law schools still accepting applications and I may try for the UK even though those deadlines passed. 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, MB350 said:

If that had happened in my life, I have no idea where I’d be, but I can tell you I’d have nowhere near a 3.7 and close to a law school acceptance like you are. This feels like crap and I can empathize to an extent (I have gone through my own share of rough). But be proud of yourself for coming out of it on the other side the way you have.

If you *want* to and have the ability, apply again because I think you will get in. If not, remember that a JD isn’t everything; you know that better than anyone, having faced the adversity you’ve overcome. Best of luck with whatever choice you make. 

And trust me, I don't say that lightly, I turned down a double digit PhD scholarship because I believed I was getting in, and I just love law way more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, marsplastic said:

Rejected via email earlier today. Was on the waitlist and applied under special circumstances,

If you don't mind sharing, what are your stats? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, SpaceLawyer said:

Honestly, not to be rude but it doesn't matter, a JD isn't everything to a lot of people but it is to me, I didn't care where I got in, I just wanted to practice law.

Be proud of what? I didn't let their deaths define me, it didn't mean anything, I overcame it all and what did it do for me? nothing, I just had the stats that would be necessary for getting into law school and evidently that has done dick all for me. It's been such a slap in the face, I got waitlisted at Ottawa U last year with a lower LSAT and no MA to only be rejected this year with a better one and a masters degree. 

I will be applying again, because frankly, what other choice do I have? it just royally screws everything up because of how old i'll be, the thousand dollars i'll have to respend on applications and the LSAT because evidently 155 wasn't high enough and by the time I start actually practicing I will have absolutely zero time before I have to start making the huge life decisions about families with absolutely zero financing to back it up. 

There's a few U.S law schools still accepting applications and I may try for the UK even though those deadlines passed. 

I think right now hearing don't worry, or its going to be okay isn't helpful to you. take a night off blow off some steam and then figure out what comes next. I'm sorry this happened to you. chin up because you literally have no other choice it's either pick up the pieces or be miserable. Honestly it seems like you've worked to damn hard for it to be the latter. good luck i'm sending out positive vibes into the universe for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, SpaceLawyer said:

Honestly, not to be rude but it doesn't matter, a JD isn't everything to a lot of people but it is to me, I didn't care where I got in, I just wanted to practice law.

Be proud of what? I didn't let their deaths define me, it didn't mean anything, I overcame it all and what did it do for me? nothing, I just had the stats that would be necessary for getting into law school and evidently that has done dick all for me. It's been such a slap in the face, I got waitlisted at Ottawa U last year with a lower LSAT and no MA to only be rejected this year with a better one and a masters degree. 

I will be applying again, because frankly, what other choice do I have? it just royally screws everything up because of how old i'll be, the thousand dollars i'll have to respend on applications and the LSAT because evidently 155 wasn't high enough and by the time I start actually practicing I will have absolutely zero time before I have to start making the huge life decisions about families with absolutely zero financing to back it up. 

There's a few U.S law schools still accepting applications and I may try for the UK even though those deadlines passed. 

Hey, I just wanted to reach out and mention I've been through similar things as you and I feel just the same, extremely disappointed and exhausted. Although I didn't lose two parents, I lost my father in my third year of undergrad finals. Wrote a lot about what events (relevant to this and other) I overcame in my personal statement for TRU and clearly that wasn't enough. I don't even know how holistic TRU really is anymore. Your GPA and LSAT are both higher than mine so I commend you there and you should have definitely been accepted. I've been active on these forums for a long time and I have noted many applicants who have received offers with lower stats than yours. I'm also looking into any other options available as I only see law as my goal as well. I've found a few US and UK options still open this late into the cycle, personal message me if you want to discuss them as I am still deciding as well. With your stats however, applying to Canadian schools would be a better option. 

For everyone else, I too have received an email today letting me know my name has been taken off wait list. This was my second time applying to TRU so I doubt I will apply again to this school. Good luck to everyone who remains on the list! Still waiting on one more Canadian school to get back to me otherwise i'll either be re-writing the LSAT and waiting another year or going abroad. If anyone has any advice on what to do from here please feel free to message me.

152 LSAT, 3.4 cgpa, around 3.7/3.8 L2 

Lots of work and volunteer experience in 3 different law firms. 

References from a professor I had during undergrad and a lawyer that's known me for over 6 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got rejected today and knocked off the waitlist. I can definitely relate to the frustration and anxiety I see on this waitlist. I’ve been rejected two cycles so it’s disheartening. But some of the best and greatest people are made by going through the worst of struggles. So I hope that we don’t lose that light and know that you are extremely talented (my stats weren’t even as comparable) and that it’ll work out when it’s meant to 😊

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so sorry about all of this guys. I have been rejected as well (was expecting it) but Leanne said this year it was extremely competitive - the most it has ever been! She told me with my stats, I would surprisingly would have got in last year. 

This year over 3200 people applied - so people feel great that you were on a waitlist. I have a great L2 but my LSAT's were horrible and she said in order to be considered I need a 155+. It is starting to get more competitive so just put in the work for the LSAT. 

For someone who has had better experiences with the LSAT - I am not giving up, if you trouble with anxiety - apply for accommodations which I what I have done. 

They are changing the policy for rewrites - so take advantage of that and rewrite before it is restricted. WORK HARD TO INCREASE YOUR LSAT!!!

21 minutes ago, 604wannabelawyer said:

Got rejected today and knocked off the waitlist. I can definitely relate to the frustration and anxiety I see on this waitlist. I’ve been rejected two cycles so it’s disheartening. But some of the best and greatest people are made by going through the worst of struggles. So I hope that we don’t lose that light and know that you are extremely talented (my stats weren’t even as comparable) and that it’ll work out when it’s meant to 😊

 

1 hour ago, AKJ said:

Hey, I just wanted to reach out and mention I've been through similar things as you and I feel just the same, extremely disappointed and exhausted. Although I didn't lose two parents, I lost my father in my third year of undergrad finals. Wrote a lot about what events (relevant to this and other) I overcame in my personal statement for TRU and clearly that wasn't enough. I don't even know how holistic TRU really is anymore. Your GPA and LSAT are both higher than mine so I commend you there and you should have definitely been accepted. I've been active on these forums for a long time and I have noted many applicants who have received offers with lower stats than yours. I'm also looking into any other options available as I only see law as my goal as well. I've found a few US and UK options still open this late into the cycle, personal message me if you want to discuss them as I am still deciding as well. With your stats however, applying to Canadian schools would be a better option. 

For everyone else, I too have received an email today letting me know my name has been taken off wait list. This was my second time applying to TRU so I doubt I will apply again to this school. Good luck to everyone who remains on the list! Still waiting on one more Canadian school to get back to me otherwise i'll either be re-writing the LSAT and waiting another year or going abroad. If anyone has any advice on what to do from here please feel free to message me.

152 LSAT, 3.4 cgpa, around 3.7/3.8 L2 

Lots of work and volunteer experience in 3 different law firms. 

References from a professor I had during undergrad and a lawyer that's known me for over 6 years.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SpaceLawyer said:

I didn't apply anywhere in the prairies because my academic interests were at other schools

Get your LSAT to 160 you will get into UVic next cycle.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, AKJ said:

Hey, I just wanted to reach out and mention I've been through similar things as you and I feel just the same, extremely disappointed and exhausted. Although I didn't lose two parents, I lost my father in my third year of undergrad finals. Wrote a lot about what events (relevant to this and other) I overcame in my personal statement for TRU and clearly that wasn't enough. I don't even know how holistic TRU really is anymore. Your GPA and LSAT are both higher than mine so I commend you there and you should have definitely been accepted. I've been active on these forums for a long time and I have noted many applicants who have received offers with lower stats than yours. I'm also looking into any other options available as I only see law as my goal as well. I've found a few US and UK options still open this late into the cycle, personal message me if you want to discuss them as I am still deciding as well. With your stats however, applying to Canadian schools would be a better option. 

For everyone else, I too have received an email today letting me know my name has been taken off wait list. This was my second time applying to TRU so I doubt I will apply again to this school. Good luck to everyone who remains on the list! Still waiting on one more Canadian school to get back to me otherwise i'll either be re-writing the LSAT and waiting another year or going abroad. If anyone has any advice on what to do from here please feel free to message me.

152 LSAT, 3.4 cgpa, around 3.7/3.8 L2 

Lots of work and volunteer experience in 3 different law firms. 

References from a professor I had during undergrad and a lawyer that's known me for over 6 years.

Msg sent! Thank you for this, I was extremely frustrated yesterday and just took the time to be away from all the law school stuff. I'm sorry to hear about your father, i know what it's like to have to overcome something like that and it isn't easy. It's the age for me right now, their deaths put me way behind and every year i'm out is another year off my career and the time i have to advance it before I have to think about having a family. I'm not someone who particularly wants to have kids at 40. I'm definitely going abroad at this point, after being waitlisted at Ottawa U last year with worse stats to being rejected this year with better ones, it's starting to feel like a crap shoot and I really don't have the time for that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, NeverGiveUp said:

Get your LSAT to 160 you will get into UVic next cycle.

Good luck!

Not to be that guy, but unless you're part of the adcom, please stop saying you'll get into this school or that school, you really don't know and while I appreciate you're trying to be supportive, it doesn't do anything for me. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, IWantJD said:

I think right now hearing don't worry, or its going to be okay isn't helpful to you. take a night off blow off some steam and then figure out what comes next. I'm sorry this happened to you. chin up because you literally have no other choice it's either pick up the pieces or be miserable. Honestly it seems like you've worked to damn hard for it to be the latter. good luck i'm sending out positive vibes into the universe for you.

Cheers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SpaceLawyer said:

Not to be that guy, but unless you're part of the adcom, please stop saying you'll get into this school or that school, you really don't know and while I appreciate you're trying to be supportive, it doesn't do anything for me. 

UofA and UVic's admissions are index based - it is easy to calculate their indexes.

Anyway got you.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NeverGiveUp said:

UofA and UVic's admissions are index based - it is easy to calculate their indexes.

Anyway got you.

Good luck!

I apologize for sounding snappy. I'm just extremely frustrated. I appreciate you providing the info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, SpaceLawyer said:

I apologize for sounding snappy. I'm just extremely frustrated. I appreciate you providing the info.

No worries - I feel your pain.

UofA index:

L2 GPA out of 4.0 * 22.5 + LSAT (Average) >= 242 -- auto admit (most likely)

UVic index:

CGPA with drops (in 4.33 scale) * 125 +  highest LSAT percentile * 5 >= 905 -- auto admit (most likely).

If your index is above 880 you will have a chance to get in through the wait-list.

https://www.uvic.ca/law/assets/docs/admissfinaid/LSAT-GPA Demographic Chart.pdf

Here is the info regarding the drops:

https://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/52391-drops-with-more-than-120-credits/

One thing I don't understand:

You are going to a foreign law school but don't want to go to UofA?

 

Edited by NeverGiveUp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, NeverGiveUp said:

No worries - I feel your pain.

UofA index:

L2 GPA out of 4.0 * 22.5 + LSAT (Average) >= 242 -- auto admit (most likely)

UVic index:

CGPA with drops (in 4.33 scale) * 125 +  highest LSAT percentile * 5 >= 905 -- auto admit (most likely).

If your index is above 880 you will have a chance to get in through the wait-list.

https://www.uvic.ca/law/assets/docs/admissfinaid/LSAT-GPA Demographic Chart.pdf

Here is the info regarding the drops:

https://lawstudents.ca/forums/topic/52391-drops-with-more-than-120-credits/

One thing I don't understand:

You are going to a foreign law school but don't want to go to UofA?

 

Because U of A doesn't really offer any room for independent academic study, all the law schools I applied to in Canada either had a self research option or the specialization I wanted.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • You’re going to think I’m picky, but yes I saw that thread and it’s not what I’m exactly looking for. I won’t post here what exactly I’m looking for because then people will be tempted to answer them here.    Yes, finally! (For people wondering why “finally”, 3 years later that’s why. Dedication for this education). Just a friendly reminder we are slightly drifting off-topic here (as I didn’t want per my initial post)! But I will answer this one out of courtesy because you saw my previous threads.
    • @CrimNation Are your interests more specific than a broad conception of a "criminal lawyer?" In addition to the distinction between Crown and defence, there is a world of difference between low-volume, high-complexity crim work and doing duty counsel or otherwise docket court work, for example.
    • I doubt any lawyer here can summarize their experience and advice for you in a post or multiple posts as mileages in the legal field differ and so does views on the subject. It is better to speak to lawyers in person and ask them these questions. Ask them what's in a day, a week, a month, a year like for them as lawyers? In the end, you must know yourself. The answers you are looking for sometimes come down to the area of law you choose to practice and what ultimately motivated you to practice this area of law - though you probably wont know this unless you enter law school. After all, what can be considered rewarding extends beyond monetary compensation and any real or perceived prestige you might feel graduating from law school. But first, don't do it for the money. You are setting yourself up for disappointment and regret. I find my job (family law litigation) rewarding and challenging despite the outward perception by many within and without the profession that it remains one of the most soul-crushing, stressful, and traumatic areas of law for anyone to practice. Matrimonial litigation is not an area that many would consider entering or remaining for long after they have discovered the nature of the work - emotionally sensitive clients, abused children, impoverished families, destroyed lives, forgone opportunities etc. Why do I find it rewarding? This is because this field of law aligns with my personal values and experiences. This is what I want to do in life. I do not profess that I do something as noble or grand as making the world a better place. I try to make it less miserable for those immediately impacted by a marital or relationship dissolution. All I can say is I care about people, their kids, and their lives after separation. Like many lawyers out there, I have sacrificed my lunch, my sleep, my vacation, my family time, and so forth to squeeze an extra hour to two at work. Even though not all my clients appreciate what I do, I know for a fact that if most of their clients were to try to manage a messy divorce on their own; some would spend years in court and thousands of dollars with no end in sight. Some would go from lawyer to lawyer, ending up spending thousands and thousands without a result. I consider steering many away from litigating based on emotion or past grievances a major victory (i.e. taking the emotional baggage out of it).  Sometimes rewarding comes in the form of directing vulnerable people to my network of mental health assistance, childcare resources, financial aid, and legal guides. Other times it is doing pro bono work for a parent who would sell everything he/she has to save a child. On the other hand, to give you a balanced perspective, I have received threats on my life, the firm, and my legal license during my short tenure as a lawyer. Many such threats came from files where I did everything I could think of to help. Collectibility (i.e. clients paying you for your time spent) is another challenge that all family lawyers face. It comes down to this: Ask yourself what makes life rewarding or worth living for you? For me, it is about working with an area of law that affects everyone on an intimate level; and those in their greatest moment of need in life.  
    • Lots of solo and small shops practice general commercial work, but you're not going to be servicing major clients – you'll be helping normal people set up and manage their businesses.  The area of big law work that seems most amenable to smaller practices is litigation, which is why you see so many litigation boutiques out there. After that, you tend to see quite a few relatively small firms practicing in the following areas:  Insolvency Labour and employment Tax (I seem to remember @kurrika posting about a tax court judge who, prior to joining the bench, had operated a solo shop for some time)  Although in the case of the latter two, those firms seem to generally service smaller clients. Litigation and insolvency seem almost uniquely well suited to servicing large clients from a small firm.  In terms of the more corporate-corporate work done at big firms, things like securities, private equity, and the like seem to be dominated by big firms, with medium sized shops picking up the slack. I don't think I've ever heard of a <5 lawyer securities shop.  This is just my general understanding of the market, and I've never really looked into L&E or tax work, so I'm open to being corrected by those with more knowledge. 
    • All things being equal, it's always going to be preferable to get reference letters from people who know you better. With that said, does it matter? It's not like you're debating whether or not you should get a TA who loves you or a prof who called you "GobletKing" one time – and hey, that's pretty close to GoblinKing, so she must kinda know you, right? – to write your letter. It sounds like you've got essentially no option except to ask professors who you aren't close with. And that's fine, lots of people get into law school every year with reference letters from profs that say little more than "they took my class, they did well, they've taken lots of classes, their grades say they did well, they'll probably continue to do well". You can be one of those people.  If I were you, I would fill any mandatory academic references with professors who seemed nice and whose course you did well in. Write a nice email setting out where you're applying, the deadlines, and asking if they think they would be able and willing to write a positive reference letter for you. The word positive is important there, because it gives profs an out if they think they could only write a neutral letter.  Once a professor agrees, offer to meet with them to discuss, and send them a copy of the following:  A table outlining how to submit the necessary letters, to whom they should be addressed, and the deadlines Your transcript Your resume A copy of your personal statement for law school Hopefully, your professor will feel comfortable pulling from your resume and personal statement in order to beef up the letter a bit. At the very least, you'll show them that you're organized, communicate effectively via writing, and that you're serious about wanting to attend law school.  After that, consider whether the non-academic references you might be able to get would be better than the academic ones. When I applied to law school, I had one professor write me a letter and one former boss write me one, simply because I thought the non-academic reference would highlight a unique part of my application.  Best of luck

×
×
  • Create New...