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TahiaDZ

Rejected from Osgoode 2019

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Also rejected on Friday!

CGPA 3.3, 154

I didn't actually even get an email, it was just updated OASIS.

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Rejected from Osgoode today.

 

cGPA 2.8(70%), 161
Did a year recently though towards a second degree and that averaged 92+%.

Got accepted to USASK though as a BC resident. 

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Posted (edited)

Not yet received any email either rejected or accepted - any idea what would that mean? Are they still sending out acceptances or that's it - all done and sent by now.

Edited by Simpson

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@Simpson I've yet to hear anything from Osgoode too. A reminder that law schools review applications until the end of June. So, there is still the possibility of hearing from Osgoode within the next month or so. In short, DON'T LOSE HOPE! :) 

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Posted (edited)

@L3gallyBlonde Thanks for your reply. Besides Osgoode, where else did you apply - any response? 

Edited by Simpson

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Rejected today

cGPA 3.47, 162 LSAT

Average ECs, PS, and LORs.

Filled out Part B as well

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Rejected this past weekend. 3.62 cGPA and 157 LSAT. 

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