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LuckyCommander

Best/Worst Things About Law School?

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Worst:  The fact that at the end of the day, all most students care about is finding the almighty articling position.  There is a huge amount of stress before you land one, and people practically tune out of law school once they've secured it.  

Best:  Entertaining profs who genuinely care and are interested in what they teach.  

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Best: Professors who care

 

Worst: Professors who don't care, and who the Faculty protects anyway when they make questionable decisions without justifying their actions.

 

But I guess I should get used to the idea of tenure and unreasonable deference. I am going to be a lawyer after all.

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Best: just getting to learn the law. I'm writing my last paper of 3L and I still get so excited when things click. Also - amazing profs, competitiveness, 1L study group, and getting to push your intellectual limits and grow as a person at the same time. 

Worst: Lousy profs, not having a lot of headspace for other pursuits that require thoughtful focus, and the tendency to focus on what I didn't achieve instead of what I did. 

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Best: You get a great education. I learned a million things about everything from surgery to tugboats to corporate structure. It was really fun.

Worst: You come out thinking like a lawyer. It's great for your professional life, terrible for everything else. You'll understand when someone is talking about how fast their car goes and you say something that involves the word "liability".

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Actually I agree with another poster on this thread - the cliques are the worst. Friendships get "settled" by a month or two into 1L and then its almost like high school. Totally different from undergrad when I made friends all throughout. Also since the law faculty is separated you have to work to meet students from other faculties. The only time I met non-law students was a part of the magic the gathering club that met at OISE in Toronto every week.

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Best: Everyone (for the most part) is fun, social, hilarious, etc. Everyone is willing to discuss school topics to help you understand, or they're willing to work with you so you both figure it out. It's mostly collegial. You'll usually find someone around who is willing to help you for whatever you need.

Worst: When the professors aren't helpful. You're already learning the content on your own, but it gets worse when you're hoping that what you took away from the readings is right.

Exam cram - little sleep and worrying about your grades.

Also, some of your fellow students. I had someone in my class who tried to fish around to know people's grades, including mine. Sketched me out for a variety of reasons.

Edited by MelonMango
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Best: Meeting brilliant and motivated people who you get to be friends with.

Worst: Watching all of their mental health slowly decline over 3 years.

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Best: thinking like a lawyer. Studying law brings clarity to your thinking and the ability to see situations from different angles. 

Worst: thinking like a lawyer. I won't trust instinct and decisions take forever because your mind is set in risk management and 'first principles' mode: why does this work? X, Y and Z could happen and A could happen if Y happens after X. 

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For me....

Best: learning; having the time to learn and immerse yourself in the topic; freedom and flexibility in my schedule; having someone to ask questions and generally not feeling stupid or inadequate for asking; not having to wear a suit; skipping if I felt like it; safety net; having credit to burn;

Worst: being so close to being a lawyer and yet so far! Doing poorly on a test and not knowing how to correct your mistakes (mostly in 1L); despite freedom and flexibility, always feeling like I have no free time (whereas after work, my brain leaves it all at the office); compromising on your class choices; having to study things you could care less about (granted, I quite enjoyed almost all of the mandatory classes after 1L so maybe this should be a plus instead of a minus); having credit to burn;

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Best: all the free food at social events, especially if they are hosted by big firms.

Worst: SNAILs and gunners.

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On 6/15/2019 at 12:32 AM, MelonMango said:

Also, some of your fellow students. I had someone in my class who tried to fish around to know people's grades, including mine. Sketched me out for a variety of reasons.

I shamelessly do this. Now I'm wondering how much I may have annoyed people who share your view. What's wrong with someone asking around to see how they did compared to their fellow students? You can always be boring and say you don't want to share. Or you can lie. 

Edited by Demander
Typo
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Is there clear definition of gunner or do different students have different things in mind when they decry the gunners at their school?

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22 minutes ago, Demander said:

I shamelessly do this. Now I'm wondering how much I may have annoyed people who share your view. What's wrong with someone asking around to see how they did compared to their fellow students? You can always be boring and say you don't want to share. Or you can lie. 

I think it's more about the the way you do it. You can ask someone how they did without seeming very off (Ex. "How'd you do?" - Usually, a fine question; open ended, lets them respond however they want). You could be direct and shameless (Ex. "What did you get?" - could put them in a difficult, uncomfortable position). Or you can also ask in a very sketchy way (I don't remember how it was, but it was) where you are clearly fishing, perhaps in a competitive way.

Also, if you got whatever grade is considered average at your school, you would have a rough idea of how you did compared to your fellow students, wouldn't you? lol.

Edited by MelonMango

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1 hour ago, Demander said:

I shamelessly do this. Now I'm wondering how much I may have annoyed people who share your view. What's wrong with someone asking around to see how they did compared to their fellow students? You can always be boring and say you don't want to share. Or you can lie. 

I would have been very annoyed had someone done this.  It is none of your business whatsoever.  If you want to know how you did compared to other students, perhaps your school or your professor publishes a class distribution.

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9 hours ago, Demander said:

I shamelessly do this. Now I'm wondering how much I may have annoyed people who share your view. What's wrong with someone asking around to see how they did compared to their fellow students? You can always be boring and say you don't want to share. Or you can lie. 

Yeah, YTA in this situation. Don't be a douchey snoop about people's grades.

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9 hours ago, capitalttruth said:

Is there clear definition of gunner or do different students have different things in mind when they decry the gunners at their school?

It used to mean someone who will throw others under the bus in an attempt to get better grades/further their goals. For example, not sharing things with their study group, the fabled ripping out pages from books in the library, put their accomplishments on display, etc.

In some schools the term has evolved into the same meaning as keener - someone who is involved in everything, an over achiever, answers every question in class, etc.

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Worst: law school itself. It's far too expensive, and it's tedious. It's full of privileged louts and SJWs.

Best: being a lawyer at the end of it all. It was definitely worth it.

Edited by QuincyWagstaff
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Worst: tired all the time. 

Best: finding that one perfect prof, excelling and seeing your work result in something worthwhile (currently helping on a charter application), finding your people, knowing that all the work will be worth it in the end. 

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 Not all, but at least a few law students are snakes who will refuse to share their notes with you even though you gladly shared your notes with them multiple times previously when they asked.

I also hate having to tolerate assholes and not being able to tell them what you truly think of them.

 

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9 hours ago, harveyspecter993 said:

I also hate having to tolerate assholes and not being able to tell them what you truly think of them.

I don't think this changes in practice.

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