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Hello everyone !!! I am currently studying law from India and want to immigrate to Canada. I am currently confused as to what degree should i pursue. Please help me out.

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If you want to practice law in Canada you want the JD. 

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Thanks hegdis. I have also heard that osgoode's llm is also a good option. Do you think that it's a better choice than jd? 

 

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Education Requirements for Registration into the Licensing Process

3.1. A person may be registered into the Licensing Process as a Candidate if he or she:

  • has obtained a Bachelor of Laws degree or a Juris Doctor degree from a law school that was, at the time the person graduated from the law school, an Accredited Law School or has received a certificate of qualification issued by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA);
  • Or has completed all of the requirements to obtain a Bachelor of Laws or Juris Doctor degree from a law school that is an Accredited Law School or a certificate of qualification issued by the NCA and is awaiting receipt of the transcript of final marks and the conferring of the degree on the Candidate by the Accredited Law School or the issuance of the certificate of qualification to the Candidate by the NCA. 

https://lso.ca/becoming-licensed/lawyer-licensing-process/licensing-process-policies

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Osgoode offers a number of LLM's, the traditional LLM (research based advanced study), the professional LLM (specific courses) and the common law LLM (basically a bridging program).

Traditional LLM's are generally valuable as a stepping stone into being a law professor and for personal growth. The professional LLM offers some help in trying to change practice areas. The common law LLM, which is not truly an LLM as it does not teach graduate level classes, is meant for people from other parts of the world to learn Canadian law. 

That being said, the legal market in Canada generally judges a prospective articling student based on where they got their JD or LLB (an articling student is the last stage of legal education in Canada where you work in a law firm under supervision). There is a substantial stigma against foreign law degrees outside of the truly elite schools. 

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Hi Lawear,

As a foreign trained lawyer myself I would recommend opting for the Canadian Common Law LLM at Osgoode or the equivalent at the University of Toronto. This degree will help satisfy the conversion requirements as set out by the National Committee on Accreditation. I would go through their website to find out more. https://flsc.ca/national-committee-on-accreditation-nca/

If you choose to do a JD (which will be three years), you are more likely to land a better articling position (the equivalent of a training contract), particularly if you are interested in business or corporate law, which is a required part of the Ontario Lawyer Licensing Process (not sure how other jurisdictions work in this regard). However the cost and time will be three times as much.

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