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pzabbythesecond

Ryerson Law open for applications this fall

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Iyaiaey said:

Yes.  Much of these renowned faculty come from Toronto or live near it.  If given the choice and equal salary or even slightly lesser salary, presumably many of them, along with top practitioners in their field, would rather teach in a school they can walk to in the downtown core than to teach in a school they must combat hours of rush hour traffic to get to.  Law firms want to hire the best people who walk through their door.  Ryerson students will have an advantage in networking because of their location as will the Ryerson career office.

 

The fact that firms are willing to drive hours to get to Osgoode, Windsor, or fly out to Dal to recruit in Toronto, I'd have a hard time seeing them skipping over a place they can recruit at on their lunch and walk back to work to.

 

Ryerson is going to attract alot of people who don't want to leave the Toronto area but are smart otherwise, both student and faculty.  Another poster  pointed out that recruiting teams were smaller when they were going outside of Toronto and therefore interviewed less people because of the time it took to get there, which what attributed to better odds of being hired at Toronto schools in part (ie. part of the reason Osgoode places better than Western or Queens- which we can agree are all excellent schools).

 

If Ryerson was not in Toronto, I'd agree with you, but its central location is what makes it what it is going to be.

Let's wait a few years and see who's right. I suspect what you're saying is way too optimistic. E.g. you're grossly undervaluing problems related to incomplete information. Why on earth would good firms, in the near term, favour applicants from a school that is new, about which there are no quality guarantees, etc. over schools where they know what they're getting? (Law is not like computer science, where school of origin may matter comparatively less since the skills required to be a good coder are easier to test in a short period of time in an interview setting or something like that.) I suppose that, by your logic, a law school opened in New York City should do better than established schools that are remote from large urban centers (e.g. Cornell). Curiously, this isn't the case; Fordham Law, despite being around for 100 years, is still considered worse than Cornell Law (which, it should be noted, only has 18 years on Fordham Law). I reiterate that, in a profession in which tradition and pedigree are highly coveted and in which most members are fairly risk averse, it seems unlikely that most law students or law profs will, at least in the short-term, opt for Ryerson over say Western or Queen's. 

Edited by Pythia

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On 6/11/2019 at 1:47 PM, wtamow said:

They are cross appointing members of other faculties before beginning external hiring

Any word on which faculty members were appointed? 

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41 minutes ago, Pythia said:

Let's wait a few years and see who's right. I suspect what your saying is way too optimistic. E.g. you're grossly undervaluing problems related to incomplete information. Why on earth would good firms, in the near term, favour applicants from a school that is new, about which there are no quality guarantees, etc. over schools where they know what they're getting? (Law is not like computer science, school of origin may matter comparatively less, since the skills required to be a good coder are easier to test in a short period of time in an interview setting or something like that.) I suppose that, by your logic, a law school opened in New York City should do better than established schools that are remote from large urban centers (e.g. Cornell). Curiously, this isn't the case; Fordham Law, despite being around for 100 years, is still considered worse than Cornell Law (which, it should be noted, only has 18 years on Fordham Law). I reiterate that, in a profession in which tradition and pedigree are highly coveted and in which most members are fairly risk averse, it seems unlikely that most law students or law profs will, at least any time soon, opt for Ryerson over say Western or Queen's. 

All Canadian law schools offer excellent education, its not like the states with Cooley.  That is the quality guarantee.  Going to a school from an entrance perspective has nothing to do with how good of a lawyer you will be.  Unless someone has evidence to the contrary that being a great lawyer is caused by going to a school with tougher admission entrance stats.... And that is also presuming Ryerson stats won't be higher than those other schools.

 

The US example fails because US is an entirely different beast made up of public and private schools and with the t-14 existing and then being dominated by private and ivy league schools.  Then you have another set of private schools who are like degree mills.  All the Canadian schools are publicly funded and all the Ontarian schools by the same government.

 

If tradition and pedigree were that dominant, the older schools like UNB, Manitoba and Usask and Dalhousie would far surpass the reputation of Western and Queens.  Is this what you believe?  I think the location of Ryerson will cause most students and faculty with the choice to choose it over anything outside the city because it saves time and money and makes it easier to network.

 

TRU is a new school, they seem to have no worse placement in OCI than Uvic and UBC according to their alumni on this board, and that is despite a major location disadvantage.

 

I agree with you, only time will tell.

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Ok no offence but will any law firms take you seriously/ hire you if you're in the first graduating class of Ryerson Law? 

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28 minutes ago, penguinh said:

Ok no offence but will any law firms take you seriously/ hire you if you're in the first graduating class of Ryerson Law? 

Maybe, maybe not? Depends on the person and the firm. It'll probably be harder than if you went to Osgoode or U of T, but people go to Windsor and get hired in a variety of positions afterwards.

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5 minutes ago, wtamow said:

Maybe, maybe not? Depends on the person and the firm. It'll probably be harder than if you went to Osgoode or U of T, but people go to Windsor and get hired in a variety of positions afterwards.

You think Ryerson Law's reputation would be better than Windsor's right now? :o 

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Just now, penguinh said:

You think Ryerson Law's reputation would be better than Windsor's right now? :o 

No, but it isn't about reputation. Most students get jobs without relying on the reputation of their school, especially students at Windsor. Employers are hiring the individual, not the school.

And just because X school places more students in Y practice area, does not mean that school necessarily has a better reputation, etc.

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1 hour ago, penguinh said:

Ok no offence but will any law firms take you seriously/ hire you if you're in the first graduating class of Ryerson Law? 

Why wouldn't they?  To think that employers aren't going to interview/hire Ryerson grads just because it's the first graduating class is silly. 

Now, if you're referring to the need not to article, then that's a different question but you haven't made that clear. My guess, and that simply is what all of us are doing with anything Ryerson-related at this point, is that many employers will require grads to be in the articling cohort.

Employers will no doubt participate in organized recruitment in the 2L year and students will be hired, just like they are from other schools. How many is anyone's guess but I don't understand why you would think that this is unlikely to happen.

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3 hours ago, penguinh said:

You think Ryerson Law's reputation would be better than Windsor's right now? :o 

Windsor's grads are still graduating and becoming practicing lawyers... The only people really concerned are 0Ls.

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44 minutes ago, Deadpool said:

Lol, access to justice at work. And you can't receive any OSAP funding either. I wonder what demographics of students this will attract...

I like the part about no minimum LSAT, GPA requirements and on-line interview. 

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They've basically placed a Toronto premium on their tuition, while still putting it at a price where they can say "cheapest in Toronto".

New applicants, if you can, please go to any other school (not counting windsor dual).

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1. What is the purpose of the online interview?

2. I agree with @Deadpool, I think this dispels any myths about how a new law school in Ontario will increase access to justice.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, pzabbythesecond said:

They've basically placed a Toronto premium on their tuition, while still putting it at a price where they can say "cheapest in Toronto".

New applicants, if you can, please go to any other school (not counting windsor dual).

Osgoode's tuition has been lowered to 25k this upcoming year, so it may not be the cheapest option in Toronto. 

https://sfs.yorku.ca/fees/courses/2019-2020/fall-winter/osgoode-hall-law-school-juris-doctor

Edited by Deadpool
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12 hours ago, Deadpool said:

Lol, access to justice at work. And you can't receive any OSAP funding either. I wonder what demographics of students this will attract...

'Access to justice"  ??  You need an IQ of 50 to believe that.

Remember the school with the suppose  to serve 'rual Ontario'?

What will they think of next? 

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14 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

'Access to justice"  ??  You need an IQ of 50 to believe that.

Remember the school with the suppose  to serve 'rual Ontario'?

What will they think of next? 

Of course I remember, I see that school's candidates at Bay St firm tours all the time. 

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22 hours ago, Deadpool said:

Osgoode's tuition has been lowered to 25k this upcoming year, so it may not be the cheapest option in Toronto. 

https://sfs.yorku.ca/fees/courses/2019-2020/fall-winter/osgoode-hall-law-school-juris-doctor

The OZ Bursaries is VERY generous. You can around $10K or more per year if you can show financial need. I ended up paying around $12,000 for L2 and L3

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On 7/21/2019 at 9:09 PM, joeyman365 said:

Some new updates via LSAC, including tuition, which will be $26,300:

https://www.lsac.org/choosing-law-school/find-law-school/canadian-law-schools/ryerson-university-faculty

I CANNOT believe Ryerson’s tuition is so high! It is indeed more expensive than Osgoode. 

Who in their right mind would pay this premium to attend Ryerson over a more established school like Western or Queens? And if you don’t happen to have family in the city, you’ll also be paying a pretty penny for rent

That’s actually absurd 

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