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pzabbythesecond

Ryerson Law open for applications this fall

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Posted (edited)

Ryerson is accepting applications now?

Edited by Ryn
Edited on request so it works better after having been split off

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2 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Ryerson is accepting applications now?

They seem to offer 1Ls only half the amount of constitutional law (class time) provided to osgoode students but fear not their students get the benefit of attending a class called called “Ryerson Law School Bootcamp” instead. 

Oh and “Emotional and Cultural Quotient Bootcamp” is a mandatory class 

https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/law/law-brochure-web.pdf

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35 minutes ago, healthlaw said:

They seem to offer 1Ls only half the amount of constitutional law (class time) provided to osgoode students but fear not their students get the benefit of attending a class called called “Ryerson Law School Bootcamp” instead. 

Oh and “Emotional and Cultural Quotient Bootcamp” is a mandatory class 

https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/law/law-brochure-web.pdf

 

What an absolute joke...

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37 minutes ago, healthlaw said:

They seem to offer 1Ls only half the amount of constitutional law (class time) provided to osgoode students but fear not their students get the benefit of attending a class called called “Ryerson Law School Bootcamp” instead. 

Oh and “Emotional and Cultural Quotient Bootcamp” is a mandatory class 

https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/law/law-brochure-web.pdf

I don't know. Emotional intelligence and mental illness as a required 1L course may not be a bad idea given how it's so prevalent in law school and the legal profession and a neglected topic. 

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9 minutes ago, Simbaa said:

I don't know. Emotional intelligence and mental illness as a required 1L course may not be a bad idea given how it's so prevalent in law school and the legal profession and a neglected topic. 

It’s a 3L course. And it’s emotional and cultural intelligence which doesn’t sound like it will be focused on mental illness but who knows. 

I agree that mental illness is something we should talk about in our profession but not in a mandatory classes. I don’t think half of Ryerson’s classes should be mandatory but then again I would never go there so I’m not their target audience I guess 

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Split from the chances thread. 

As a side note, I think this discussion is worth having but let’s try and not get it locked like last time, mmk

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1 hour ago, healthlaw said:

They seem to offer 1Ls only half the amount of constitutional law (class time) provided to osgoode students but fear not their students get the benefit of attending a class called called “Ryerson Law School Bootcamp” instead. 

Oh and “Emotional and Cultural Quotient Bootcamp” is a mandatory class 

https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/law/law-brochure-web.pdf

As a side note that brochure is terrible. Could they not have come up with a better sales pitch at the end than “our LPP stats are great because it’s designed to place everyone somewhere (just like a car is designed to drive, so here are some stats about how 100% of sold Fords are capable of driving); also a totally unrelated clinic has created a ton of startups. GO RYERSON LAW!”

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1 hour ago, healthlaw said:

They seem to offer 1Ls only half the amount of constitutional law (class time) provided to osgoode students but fear not their students get the benefit of attending a class called called “Ryerson Law School Bootcamp” instead. 

 Oh and “Emotional and Cultural Quotient Bootcamp” is a mandatory class 

 https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/law/law-brochure-web.pdf

Aren't all the black letter law courses half-year? I don't know if they're doing more classtime per semester, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable learning 50% less contract and criminal law than every other Canadian grad. 

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3 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

Aren't all the black letter law courses half-year? I don't know if they're doing more classtime per semester, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable learning 50% less contract and criminal law than every other Canadian grad. 

I honestly doubt it's literally half the law. You can double the hours of those classes and cover it in half the time, for example.

I'm pretty sure Osgoode has some classes finish in the first term, for example, and people apply with those final grades to 1L recruitment positions (I think? Someone from Oz can confirm).

My basic point is, until the hourly break down of those classes become apparent, we can't nor should assume they're teaching half the law. They still need to train graduates which the LSO deems competently trained.

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2 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:


My basic point is, until the hourly break down of those classes become apparent, we can't nor should assume they're teaching half the law. They still need to train graduates which the LSO deems competently trained.

Isn't it FLSC who determines this? The same FLSC that sets an unbelievably low bar with the NCA exams? 

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Just now, Eeee said:

Isn't it FLSC who determines this? The same FLSC that sets an unbelievably low bar with the NCA exams? 

I don't actually know. I'm just saying let's go with the safer assumption, until more information comes to light.

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I think their whole selling point is how they are different from existing law schools, all of these nouveau sounding initiatives are meant to act as justifications for why a Ryerson law school was needed in the first place. 

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40 minutes ago, spicyfoodftw said:

I'm clearly out of the loop, but I thought that the whole Ryerson thing fell of the track?

It is still a go but without any provincial funding or affiliation. By extension of this, prospective law students at Ryerson would not qualify for provincial benefits such as OSAP etc. 

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apologies for the triple post, but I for one am interested in seeing how Ryerson competes with the existing Toronto schools. Location wise, I have heard so many people say they would pick Ryerson over Osgoode 😮 😮 

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2 minutes ago, Hopefullawapplicant said:

apologies for the triple post, but I for one am interested in seeing how Ryerson competes with the existing Toronto schools. Location wise, I have heard so many people say they would pick Ryerson over Osgoode 😮 😮 

I foresee many such post-facto justifications 

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1 minute ago, Hopefullawapplicant said:

apologies for the triple post, but I for one am interested in seeing how Ryerson competes with the existing Toronto schools. Location wise, I have heard so many people say they would pick Ryerson over Osgoode 😮 😮 

Ryerson is more proximate to favourable areas (Downtown Toronto, annex, financial district, entertainment districts/various bar/pub strips) than Oz.

Ryerson area itself isn't better than Oz. It may even be worse. 

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Posted (edited)

I could be wrong but is this not the worst possible place right now in the Country to start another law school?
 

Edited by Dreamer89
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1 minute ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Ryerson is more proximate to favourable areas (Downtown Toronto, annex, financial district, entertainment districts/various bar/pub strips) than Oz.

Ryerson area itself isn't better than Oz. It may even be worse. 

Ok, Ryerson location is way better than Oz even if we only take say like 200 meters from each campus. Yes, there’s nothing east of Ryerson, but, Bay/Yonge and Dundas/College/Queen are way better than... welp, I don’t even know what landmarks to mention around York campus... plus ryerson has some cool landmarks by it like YD Square, Nathan Philips/City Hall, Eaton Centre, Court of Appeal, etc.

But yes, also being on downtown subway line and proximity to even cooler neighbourhoods is also key. 

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