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July3257

Options if not accepted/any advice

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I am currently considering what I should do if I dont get in this year. 

My stats are cGPA 3.2 L2 3.4 with a 163 LSAT.

Because I am a year out of school now and have been working a minimum wage retail job since then while waiting for my outcome, I feel like if I dont get in this year my application for this coming November will be even weaker (due to not having any academic references or meaningful non academic reference).

I am considering such options as:

A) a one year masters for two reasons: 1. If I succeed academically in the master (I am confident I would) I can use it to further show a positive trend academically to slightly offset my sub-par grades, and 2. to have at least one academic reference for when I apply again.

B) Acquiring some related job for a year, such as a government job or something along those lines, to have another strong reference and a good addition to my PS and other soft considerations.

C) volunteer at a good organization for a year for another possible reference and softs and boost to PS.

If I dont get in I plan on trying to do all three.

I am wondering if anyone has any experience with not being accepted their first try and having to plan out ways to boost your application for the next time you apply and also if anyone has any advice or opinions on this plan I would really appreciate any feedback. I am getting nervous about my chances this round and would like to start implementing any plan asap if I dont get in. 

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I don't think pursuing a Master's just for the sake of admission to law school is worth it as most schools consider your first undergrad. At best, it would be considered a soft.

If I were in your position, I would try and get an office job or something in a professional setting to gain office experience. I would also work on the LSAT. I know 163 is a good score, but with a lower GPA, you need to get a really good score to compensate. Even 3-4 points more would greatly improve your chances.

Final advice - try not to worry; people get accepted all throughout summer. The fact that you were not rejected yet is a good sign. I think you will likely in somewhere.

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Yeah, I do know that the grades of the Masters wont be considered when weighing gpa but I do think as a soft it could serve to show that I am trending positively away from my low gpa, but I do know it would just be considered as a soft. I think out of the 3 options I laid out the masters would be the least likely thing I would do due to the high cost and little addition it would at to my application, I admit that. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Your current academic references should be willing to provide another reference if it doesn't work out this year.

Do something productive if it doesn't work out; I personally prefer the Master's out of the above options. When I didn't get in, I went back to a unionized job for a year, re-took the LSAT, and changed my personal statement. 

Edited by Trew

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If you're going to do a Masters, make sure it's something that will be useful even if law school is off the table. 

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2 hours ago, July3257 said:

I am currently considering what I should do if I dont get in this year. 

My stats are cGPA 3.2 L2 3.4 with a 163 LSAT.

Because I am a year out of school now and have been working a minimum wage retail job since then while waiting for my outcome, I feel like if I dont get in this year my application for this coming November will be even weaker (due to not having any academic references or meaningful non academic reference).

I am considering such options as:

A) a one year masters for two reasons: 1. If I succeed academically in the master (I am confident I would) I can use it to further show a positive trend academically to slightly offset my sub-par grades, and 2. to have at least one academic reference for when I apply again.

B) Acquiring some related job for a year, such as a government job or something along those lines, to have another strong reference and a good addition to my PS and other soft considerations.

C) volunteer at a good organization for a year for another possible reference and softs and boost to PS.

If I dont get in I plan on trying to do all three.

I am wondering if anyone has any experience with not being accepted their first try and having to plan out ways to boost your application for the next time you apply and also if anyone has any advice or opinions on this plan I would really appreciate any feedback. I am getting nervous about my chances this round and would like to start implementing any plan asap if I dont get in. 

In case you don't get in this cycle:

1. Get a masters:

UofA considers your masters grades.

UofT: In borderline cases, a very strong performance in a graduate program may overcome modest weaknesses in an undergraduate record.

https://www.law.utoronto.ca/admissions/jd-admissions/admissions-policies

2. Get a higher LSAT score (close to 170 or 170+).

3. Get some good ECs / volunteer / work experiences.

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Hey OP, my stats and experiences are so similar to yours that I almost thought I made this post during sleepwalking😂 . I am worried about my chances this cycle, and in the meantime I feel very mixed up about my career plans if I couldn't get in this year. I opted out of doing a master since a)the cost is high b)I don't see a reason to earn a master degree while not planning on working in that field (I am dead set on being a lawyer and my undergrad major has very weak connections with law). During the past year, I have been looking for government-related jobs but I didn't get one, probably due to my lack of networking and working experiences in this field IMO. 

I am currently considering if I should do a certificate in immigration law. It seems to be an opportunity to gain networking and have a better idea of the legal field. But I also understand a certificate in immigration wouldn't open up the kind of legal career I want. The cost isn't low either, so I am now debating whether I should go. The waiting is driving me crazy and without even a clear plan I feel increasingly anxious as days go by😰

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34 minutes ago, OffersPlease said:

Hey OP, my stats and experiences are so similar to yours that I almost thought I made this post during sleepwalking😂 . I am worried about my chances this cycle, and in the meantime I feel very mixed up about my career plans if I couldn't get in this year. I opted out of doing a master since a)the cost is high b)I don't see a reason to earn a master degree while not planning on working in that field (I am dead set on being a lawyer and my undergrad major has very weak connections with law). During the past year, I have been looking for government-related jobs but I didn't get one, probably due to my lack of networking and working experiences in this field IMO. 

I am currently considering if I should do a certificate in immigration law. It seems to be an opportunity to gain networking and have a better idea of the legal field. But I also understand a certificate in immigration wouldn't open up the kind of legal career I want. The cost isn't low either, so I am now debating whether I should go. The waiting is driving me crazy and without even a clear plan I feel increasingly anxious as days go by😰

You have 163 LSAT  and 3.5 GPA after drops (for UVic), right?

Getting your LSAT to 166+ you will get into UBC and UVic next cycle.

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18 hours ago, NeverGiveUp said:

In case you don't get in this cycle:

1. Get a masters:

UofA considers your masters grades.

UofT: In borderline cases, a very strong performance in a graduate program may overcome modest weaknesses in an undergraduate record.

https://www.law.utoronto.ca/admissions/jd-admissions/admissions-policies

2. Get a higher LSAT score (close to 170 or 170+).

3. Get some good ECs / volunteer / work experiences.

Is this advice tailored to those (aim for 170 LSAT to compensate lower GPA with lower stats) applying in the General category? I applied in Access with 3.25, 3.7, 164.

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6 minutes ago, capitalttruth said:

Is this advice tailored to those (aim for 170 LSAT to compensate lower GPA with lower stats) applying in the General category? I applied in Access with 3.25, 3.7, 164.

Yes, for General category.

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