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Just called in, confirmed on the waitlist. They let me know that the waitlist is not ranked yet.

Index 91.54

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Just called and it looks like I'll be on the waitlist as well. I was told they couldn't confirm index scores so it will need to be self-calculated. Their waitlist in the regular category is strictly ranked by the numbers and nothing else. 

Index 91.13

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Called in just now as well and since I applied discretionary all I was told was that decisions would be made late May. My index is 90.75 (self-calculated).

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Just got the email that I have been waitlisted. The email said ranked list will be available at the end of May. 

Index: 91.3x (unconfirmed)

Edited by KJR

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Waitlisted today.  I withdrew my application as I have already accepted another offer.  

LSAT: 164

cGPA: 3.6

w/ drops: 3.7

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Waitlisted today! Self calculated index: 91.13.

LSAT: 164

cGPA with drops: 82%

Will be withdrawing my application!

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Waitlisted today. Really crossing my fingers that the stars align and I receive an offer.

Unsure of my true index because I'm not exactly sure how they dealt with some transfer credits, but without the transfer credits or drops, it's 91.38.

LSAT: 168

GPA: 3.7 (without drops).

Does anyone have any information about how many students they usually place on the waitlist, or what percentage of waitlisted applicants normally get in?

Edited by skbc4699

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3 hours ago, skbc4699 said:

Waitlisted today. Really crossing my fingers that the stars align and I receive an offer.

Unsure of my true index because I'm not exactly sure how they dealt with some transfer credits, but without the transfer credits or drops, it's 91.38.

LSAT: 168

GPA: 3.7 (without drops).

Does anyone have any information about how many students they usually place on the waitlist, or what percentage of waitlisted applicants normally get in?

I don't know how you aren't in already. I got an offer with a 166 lsat and a 3.7 GPA (80%) it jumps up to 81.9 with the drops. I am rewriting the lsat though and if I hit 170+ I'm going to Columbia 

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@skbc4699

I'm also surprised you didn't get an offer b/c the drops typically raise your cGPA. Even with a small increase your index would hit 92+ 

Either way, if your stats are what you say you should be fairly high on the waitlist. You can check last year's waitlist thread to get an idea how many people got in. But take that with a grain of salt because every year is different and the possibility exists that no one gets in off the waitlist. Definitely keeping my fingers crossed that is not the case though.

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I would suggest that there are issues with GPA calculations between institutions. Even small discrepancies can have significant impact- I calculated my GPA twice (first time using the wrong method) and the two resulting index scores were .17 apart which is significant given the very minor error I made the first time. 

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For anyone who is interested - went down a stress rabbit hole about the waitlist and found this in a 2014 waitlist thread - 

- - -

How many people put down a deposit and then withdrew before classes began:

2008  49

2009  46

2010  35

2011  32

2012  44

2013  48

- - -

They will send out more offers than there are spots however, so I know that those don't translate to waitlist acceptances. But still - the waitlist does normally move, there is hope for us guys!

Edited by skbc4699
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On 3/29/2019 at 1:42 PM, beanjones said:

Self calculated! I may call in next week and confirm if I haven't heard about position on the waitlist.

Any update?

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