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On 5/29/2019 at 10:42 AM, shawniebear said:

No, I cannot emphasize enough how much I regretted taking this course. I took the course with Geva, and he is a good professor, but based on the name of the course i thought it was a course that was about .. commercial law. The course really should have been called "The Personal Property Security Act", because literally all we did in the class was go through the PPSA line by line, with case law annotations. Needless to say, thats not what I signed up for and the PPSA isn't exactly the most exciting statute. 

https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/courses-and-seminars/commercial-law-2/

"This course will examine the law of secured transactions in personal property and suretyships, as well as the scope and application of the Ontario Sale of Goods Act as it relates to secured transactions."

No, that's precisely what you signed up for. 

  • Haha 1

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/courses-and-seminars/commercial-law-2/

"This course will examine the law of secured transactions in personal property and suretyships, as well as the scope and application of the Ontario Sale of Goods Act as it relates to secured transactions."

No, that's precisely what you signed up for. 

To be fair it really should be called “Secured Transactions” like it’s called at U of T - and like it’s called on the casebook that was used  

I also didn’t  know what to expect when I took it but enjoyed it (a few years back)

Edited by healthlaw

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To add, courses I enjoyed:

Family law with Kierstead, Estates with Black, Real Estate with Carter (which I believe is being taught by another prof now)

Hated tax but glad I took it anyway. I would recommend tax. I also strongly recommend Biz Ass and Trusts. You don’t need to gun for corporate law for these classes to be useful. 

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1 minute ago, healthlaw said:

To add, courses I enjoyed:

Family law with Kierstead, Estates with Black, Real Estate with Carter (which I believe is being taught by another prof now)

Hated tax but glad I took it anyway. I would recommend tax. I also strongly recommend Biz Ass and Trusts. You don’t need to gun for corporate law for these classes to be useful. 

A lot of profs I've spoken to say estates  and tax are good for the bar.

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15 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

A lot of profs I've spoken to say estates  and tax are good for the bar.

Yup 10/10. I mean you can teach the material to yourself but why would you want to 

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evidence with Paciocco and tax with Parachin were highlights from 3L. admin was also incredibly useful and interesting, although I took it with Dean Sossin so that is no longer an option.

for those recommending statutory interpretation - kettles/porter session was a nightmare! just buy the book and read it on your own time, and don't waste your time with that course unless you don't mine (a) going through 150+ slides in one lecture or (b) a prof who has never taught and stumbles over his notes for class. 

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You do NOT need to take tax. Take it if you want to practice it or need it for your practice, but it's not essential for the bar. 

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I strongly recommend taking Contract Remedies - it is taught by a couple of lawyers from Blakes, gives you a tonne of practical experience, and is overall a really fun class. You are evaluated on arguments made in response to fact scenarios and the profs challenge you (quite literally as you are presenting your arguments) to think of persuasive and creative legal solutions. It can be a little intimidating at first but it is 100% worth it and great preparation for post-grad. Best seminar at Osgoode, hands-down.

Business associations is a great class, especially with Forbes. Admin law, tax, and trusts are also useful. Legal Ethics with Mercer helps immensely with the bar and is good for familiarizing oneself with the duties and obligations of a practicing lawyer.

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