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Vmullz

Dropping out of masters

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I've always debated between accounting and law. I decided this past summer that I would take a master's in accounting rather than pursue law school. At this point, i'm realizing I regret my decision. I am in the first semester of my 2 semester program and am debating dropping out after the first semester in order to study for the LSAT and apply to law school. In addition, my marks in the masters program have not been as good as my undergrad (will likely be low 70's instead of low 80's). 

My concern at this point is how dropping out of my program after the first semester with low 70's will impact my law school application and am wondering if anyone would be able to give me advice on whether or not they feel this will impair my application.

 

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I don't think it would. Most schools are only concerned with undergrad grades. That's my impression, however, and I haven't sat on an admissions committee (though I have posed this question to people on adcomms).

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I dropped out of my Masters 2 in Mechanical engineering 2 semesters in, to apply for law school. Had courses show as withdrawn. I doubt it affected my application since I got in to my top choice.

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I'm also making the switch from accounting to law - I practiced in industry for 7 years though. If you've decided for sure to pursue law, there's no point in doing the accounting masters. I would just explain the lower-than-average grades from the one semester in your personal statement. Most schools look at your undergraduate grades.

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I dropped out of my masters when I got into law school. I already had another Masters and I don’t think the law school I got accepted school ( and the only school I applied too) even looked at my MSc grades ( but they were very strong).

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Maybe you should take a step back and debate as to whether you really should drop your masters. You're already half way there after all. First off, and yes it's harsh, but you may not even get into law school. Second, studying for the LSAT isn't overly time intensive so it may be worthwhile to finish your masters simultaneously while studying. A masters in accounting will be sure to attract some attention during OCIs.

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